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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, I am trying to repair a DC Power jack on a toshiba satellite 2435. The computer will not take a charge at all even from a new power cord. If you wiggle the cord enough my sister says the charge light comes on very briefly once in awhile. I have not seen this happen. I do notice that the large center pin in the center of the DC Jack is slightly loose and wiggles back and forth. Possible from the cord being tripped over? I would assume that the pin should be solid and stationary in he Jack. I have already disassembled the laptop down to having the motherboard on my desk with full access to the DC Jack. What I would like to ask is whether the solder joints look OK. My soldering skills are amateur at best. All the solder joints for the DC Jack are yellowish/brown. I'm not sure if this is ok? Posted is a picture. I'd appreciate any feedback i can get as to whether the whole jack should be replaced, just resolder some joints, or anything else you can tell me. Also, anyone know a really good soldering tutorial online. Thanks alot in advance for the help.

 

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I'm no expert but the black spot near the front and the color of the solder joints point to this being burnt out and needing replacement
 

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I have to go along with Brian. I'm not an expert either but I have a general understanding of the issue - Most jacks I've seen have 4 solder points (pins) the one you have has seven, the seventh looking like a complete burn through. I wouldn't try to resolder it even if it looks fixable. Boards are constructed in layers and the holes that the pins go into may have metal sleeves that connect to traces on the inner layer (s), In order to assure contact with the inner layers, you have to remove all the existing solder and start clean

soldering guide
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
additional information

Thanks for the replies guys, I think I need to clarify a few things. I have not yet attempted the repair, i've done no soldering yet. The way it looks in the picture is how it looks when I took it out of the laptop. Also, that thing that looks like a black spot in the middle of the six solder points is actually just a plastic support pin for the jack. I guess from what I've heard and from my own common sense, the best idea is to just attempt a total replacement of the old jack with the new one.
The laptop belonged to my sister, and when it stopped charging she got a new one. She likes this one better than the new one though. So since I have a degree in the IT field, I told her I would attempt to fix it, with no guarantee that I can successfully do it. She cannot pay a professional $500 to fix it, since quite often the repair shop will not even successfully do it anyway, and if they do, the repair will sometimes not hold, and then you are out $500. I should mention that she had this same problem with the same laptop before, while it was under warranty. The DC Jack was replaced when she sent it away for repair a couple years ago.
One thing i'd like to know, what is the likelyhood that a repair like this will work, provided I am careful with the solder and replace the jack with a new one? What is the chance that when the jack got broke (or blown, whatever the case may be) it took a part of the board with it? Many thanks for all the great replies, and if anyone has more input, please add it.
 

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It’s a curiousity that the plastic support pin is numbered. It really looks like a burn due to the color but now that you mention it I can makeout the shape of the pin. In light of that, now it looks as if the hole for the pin is ragged as if the pin may have been glued originally and the joint burned out intentionally when they replaced the original jack, And the prior repair explains the discoloration of the solder points. In any case, to my recollection, most instances of the broken jack syndrome have happened gradually as illustrated by your being able to move the jack or pin and make sufficient contact to light the charge led. That said, it’s very likely it can be repaired successfully and that no other damage has occurred to the mobo. I think the tough part of the repair is desoldering the old part
 

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If you do not have a lot of experience with soldering, you may want to pay a TV repair shop to unsolder and resolder the jack. They should not charge much to do this.
 
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