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Discussion Starter #1
I've been reading up on thermoelectric coolers for some time now, but I've been too afraid to use one because of the problems people encounter with them. Considering they they bring temperatures down so low that condensation occurs on internal computer parts, I would never put one on my CPU. I know that there are ways to protect from condensation, but regardless, who wants water dripping inside their case anyway? Wet carpet and a rusty case are other things to keep in mind... After some time thinking about active cooling, I got an idea. What if I were to use a thermoelectric cooler, like the MCW5002-AT from Swiftech, but integrate it into my system so that is doesn't contact any of my computer's electrical parts? My design in mind was to keep my current water cooling setup, but replace the radiator with a thermoelectric cooler and heatsink. I would reverse the native polarity on the cooler, so that it transferred heat towards the copper base, rather than from it. The base would be attached to an all-copper heatsink with a fan on the heatsink for heat removal. So, the heated water flows into the thermoelectric cooler and the unit pulls heat from the water and transfers it to the heatsink. Condensation might still be a problem, but it wouldn't be dripping off of my motherboard... But then again, Swiftech's unit is coated with an anti-condensation solution, and the rubber tubing of my water cooling system probably won't shed any water. A last concern of mine was the efficiency of the cooler being too great, and resulting in frozen water in my cooling system. I considered using an alcohol solution to avoid the freezing so the liquid cooling system would in fact remain liquid, rather than ice.

Does this sound plausible to anyone? I mean, it would definitely be a much safer method of integrating thermoelectrics into my cooling system since it wouldn't threaten my motherboard and CPU with water. If anyone doesn't understand my idea here, please ask and I will attempt to explain it better. If this is a good idea, I'm going to try it out. Any input helps. Thanks.
 

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As is with all water cooling and air cooling setups, it can only get down to a minimum of ambient temperature. I have an X2 processor and I want to make sure it is nice and cool to promote long processor life. I suppose I expected too much out of water cooling when I first put it in...
 

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StaticInMyHead said:
As is with all water cooling and air cooling setups, it can only get down to a minimum of ambient temperature. I have an X2 processor and I want to make sure it is nice and cool to promote long processor life. I suppose I expected too much out of water cooling when I first put it in...
By the time yor cpu burns out on liquid you will probably need a new one anyway.
 

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That sounds like a neat idea, but one thing i can think of that may be a problem is cooling the peltier. You're right back to air cooling and in my mind, it's a waste of time to put a peltier to cool the water, only to have inadequate cooling on the peltier itself and get nowhere... know what i mean?

If you go with an insane powered peltier, you'll just exceed the limits of air cooling again.

If you go with a lower powered peltier, you aren't cooling your liquid the way you're probably hoping to, since the liquid has a far higher specific heat than air.

I say if you can cool the peltier adequately enough to have it working decently, i'd be interested in your results.
 

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StaticInMyHead said:
As is with all water cooling and air cooling setups, it can only get down to a minimum of ambient temperature. I have an X2 processor and I want to make sure it is nice and cool to promote long processor life.
I would hate to say it but, in my opinion, the setup seems to be too excessive and more money than it's worth. The standard cooling or watercooling should be sufficient. Even to reach ambient temps. By the time your processor has expired, it will outlived it's useful life.
You might want to invest the funds elsewhere, such as dual monitors, more memory, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
I know what you're saying, crazijoe, but money is not really an issue for me here. I'm not on a very tight budget, but I don't want to make a 'stupid purchase,' you know? I won't put a peltier on my motherboard, because I don't like the idea of condensation to close to my key parts at all. My case is big enough to put the thermoelectric equipment in a completely separate chamber, so that won't be an issue. I do plan to upgrade other components later, but for now, I want to be sure it is cooled fairly efficiently before I can do any more overclocking.
Regarding the other reply...I have some ideas in mind for cooling the peltier. I planned to mount it directly to a high-quality copper heatsink with the best arctic paste I can find. The fact that the thermoelectric plate 'pushes' heat towards the heatsink will make it cool more efficiently. The more heat it comes into contact with, the more heat it transfers, the hotter the heatsink gets, and the more heat my 92mm tornado pumps out. :) I think of it as more like shoving the heat out of my case, rather than letting it go out when it gets to an exhaust fan.
 
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