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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Was looking at GigaByte, Asus & Intel MoBo's over at Price Grabber, in hopes of custom building a new new digital audio workstation; & it looked to me like these new-tech boards (& their accompanying BIOS') only offered one IDE Channel.

[In the past (& on my current machine)...the best performance for PC based digital audio recording was to run the multitracking software (SONAR, Cubase, etc.) on the primary drive/channel; & utilize the secondary drive/channel for the recording & playback of audio data.]

Not knowing anything about RAID...I began looking into this; & found that all the new systems utilize SATA. But...how would the above dual drive channel scenario be accomplished? Are all SATA drives connected to one channel? Do I have to go to RAID for a system with two drives/channels? If I do...is that system more or less effeicient (than separate IDE channels) for the described use?

What should I do?

Thanks,

mark4man
 

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Welcome to TSF:

first off please give "the boys" a total dollar budget to work with any we LOVE to make suggestions.

Second of all Sata drives are fast replacing IDE drives at least at this time/ who knows what the future holds ????? Sata drives offer much faster data transfer rates than do IDE drives.

second many boards offer two IDE channels / many also have dropped the secondary channel

There is never a worry about a "lack" of IDE channels you coulkd always install a PCI controller card for IDE components / they are cheap at $40.00 ???

in MY humble Opinion SATA drives and Sata controllers at this time in their evolution are not as reliable and dependable as the "old work horse" / IDE or especially SCSI systems. However wwe would have to be rather short sighted not to embrace the far superior performance of SATA drives & the sata controller.

so in summary / the smartest move for you (IMO) is to have the "C" drive be a 80 gig Sata western digital Raptor Drive (thats speed & class) and then have a 250 gig (you said you were into music that means lotts of storage space ????) IDE drive for back-ups & extra storage / dont leave anything on the SATA drive from day to day you CANT live without / then if your sata drive gets flaky >>>>> no biggie you can clone to the IDE drive on a weekly or what ever routine

Depends how into music you are and what the budget is to work with ????
SCSI still offers the fastest CDR drives because they dont tax the CPU and system bus as hard but they are more expensive >>>> your budget will tell us what to specify ??????

As far as boards go / most of them are all good Asus still seems to have the lions share of the custom builders market with abit, MSI nipping at their heels
i dont really think the gigabyte is that close to the top as the others are ????

dont hesitate to ask more questions

If youre not a BIG time gamer than dont waste your money on SLI system / again the budget will tell us where to head

for around $1500.00 you can get a VERY solid system

just ? please make sure you get a high quality big PSU / its the most overlooked KEY component of a system / very bit as crucial as the CPU, mobo, memory, video card Enermax or Antec 550 watt is grrrreat !!!!!

fire away with the questions


regards

joe
 

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linderman has very good points. However I am one that strongle believes in the reliability and performance of SATA (for the consumer level). Most of my systems are SATA.
Typically the reason the computer industry made the move to SATA is because IDE/ATA has reached it's maximum potential. 133MB/s is the max you will acheive out of PATA. Mostly because of the chance of cross talk and fragmented data that is the cause of parallel cabling. Standard PATA cabling used a 40pin/40 conductor cabling. When transfer speed went to 66MB/s, Data integrity started to degrade because of fragmentation due to cross talk of the cabling. To solve this problem they introduced a 40pin/80 conductor cable. Every other wire in an 80 conductor cable is a ground wire that would shield the chance of cross talk. Well now that speeds are up to 133MB/s data integrity is not stable again.
SATA has aleviated much of this and can transfer data up to 450MB/s. Although these speeds are not present in todays system, it leaves us room for future expansion.

Most newer Intel boards have taken advantage of SATA and have incorporated 4 SATA channels into the southbridge controller of their chipset and only provide a single IDE channel for legacy devices, such as optical drives. Some MB manufacturers noticed this lack off IDE support and have opted to add additional IDE controllers into their MB designs.
Remember, One SATA channel will only support a single device. No more Master/Slave/CS setups. Therefore the the single device will not need to share the bandwidth of the channel with another device.

The thing you must look at is IDE is an old technology that will be replaced. Much like ISA slots on old motherboards, IDE controllers will eventually not be part of MB designs in the future.
And with the advancement of PCI-e standard PCI peripherals may follow suit.

Here is more information on SATA.
http://www.serialata.org/satatechnology.asp
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
linderman & crazijoe...

Thanks very much !!!...superb info...& also very timely (someone in another forum had mentioned north/southbridge connection directly on the MoBo...& I was wondering: "that's nice, but how is that beneficial?"; & then crazijoe comes along with reference to the chipset.)

Thanks again...I'll put this info to good use,

mark4man
 

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mark4man said:
linderman & crazijoe...

Thanks very much !!!...superb info...& also very timely (someone in another forum had mentioned north/southbridge connection directly on the MoBo...& I was wondering: "that's nice, but how is that beneficial?"; & then crazijoe comes along with reference to the chipset.)
This is true because the controller directly ties into the southbridge can take advantage of the full bandwith. A separate controller (either a separate one built into the MB or one attached to a PCI interface) will be limited to the speed of the PCI bus and will have to share the bandwidth with other devices (LAN sound, etc.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
This is true because the controller directly ties into the southbridge can take advantage of the full bandwith. A separate controller (either a separate one built into the MB or one attached to a PCI interface) will be limited to the speed of the PCI bus and will have to share the bandwidth with other devices
& I can't tell you how much more important to the recording/playback of digital audio that is...since that data form is sequential (continuous streaming/throughput) in nature (after buffering, that is.)

Thanks again,

mark4man
 
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