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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
well i decided that i wanted to experience somethign different then windows, and possibly faster than windows? well i was wondering if someone coudl help me do all the processes to dual boot my computer iwth windows xp and linux. i am not sure what linux to use i am currently researching that but i want something that will be fast with AIM, an internet browser, and music. thats prety much all i use my computer for and windows has to many things going on that makes my computer to slow. if any of this makes any sense i could use some help. if anyone has a good linux distro i could go with that will be fast wtih the things i need that would be great.

thanks
 

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Hey,

Glad to see you're expanding your horizons. Linux has come pretty far and more manufacturers and programmers are taking notice every day. Any current Linux distribution will have what you're looking for. If you can function like a normal person in Windows, you'll be able to do the same in Linux. You can view the distributions I use and go with anyone of those, they're all good. For a newbie, I'd suggest either Suse or Ubuntu. They have a much better package management system (kind of like your add/remove programs in Windows) which you'll be able to understand and adapt to more easily.

When you install a new Linux distro (distribution), it will install Grub (boot loader, like ntldr in Windows) in the MBR on the Windows system. It will automatically recognize Windows. So, you'll have no problems booting, at least we hope.

When you get into Linux, there are significant differences, but a lot of similarities. For instance, both Windows and Linux have the same system requirements. As for the differences, Linux has a much better memory management system. You'll never use your SWAP partition (paging file or virtual memory in Windows speak), which results in a great speed boost. Linux protects yourself from yourself, you will NOT have an administrator account. That way you cannot delete important system files or anything like that. Be careful when you first install, like Windows, Linux will attempt to format the rest of the free space with it's own file system (which cannot be read or written to by Windows without the proper drivers, which it does not come with standard), so make sure you determine how big of a / partition you want.

When you begin to install Linux and research it a little, you'll understand more of what I'm saying. Don't be afraid to ask questions about Linux, it can and will get confusing.

Regards,

Brandon
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
wow tahnks for that info. yeah i was thinking of Ubuntu. where do i set my partion requirements? and do i jsut download linux ubuntu and it will do the rest or do i have to do somethign else?
 

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Hey,

I personally hate downloading Linux distro's, so I usually just get the ones that come in magazines. I believe Linux Magazine (this month it is a Starburst yellow) and it has Ubuntu inside of it. I purchased this one just for the CD.

Ubuntu is weird, it boots up as a Live CD first, and then you have click on thew "install" icon on the desktop. From there you'll get to a point where it'll get you to set the partition scheme. When you're setting it, you need two things: 1. Swap partition. 2. / partition.

The SWAP partition is as I described, and you need this. The / partition is the root partition. This is where everything is installed. The SWAP partition is said to be 1.5 times the size of your current amount of RAM. The / partition can be any size you want. You'll have to study the screen a little bit before you set the size of the partition for Linux. If worse comes to worst and you don't like what happened when you installed Linux, you can erase the partition from Windows and start over again.

An extra tidbit, you may want to create a FAT32 partition. That can be done from either Windows or Linux, and this can be shared between the two OS's. NTFS can be read from Linux but it cannot write to a NTFS partition YET. It's still in it's infancy stage and attempt to write to it could cause the NTFS file system to become corrupt and unusable.

Regards,

Brandon
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
so i downloaded it, and im guessing i jsut install now and after its installed it brings me to the partioning stuff im guessing also. i have 512 mb of ram so i should put 768 as my partioning? and what iso opener would you suggest?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
i got the ISO and i got daemon. mounted teh image on a virtual drive but i cant find the instll. all it shows are programs that run on unbuntu. anyone know how to instal it with daemon.
 

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Hey,

Usually when you download Linux from the 'net, there are a series of ISO images. For Ubuntu, we'll assume there are seven. So, you download all seven ISO images and you have to burn them all to CD using the option "burn as image." That will make those CD's bootable. You have to go in order, 1-7, and after you're done that will have installed the OS on your hard drive.

In regard to your PM's, I've never installed from multiple CD's... I've only done it from one DVD. In all of my experience with Linux and installing 3 different OS's, it always gave the option to dual boot with Windows FIRST. You do have the option to destroy all the partitions and have solely Linux. I can send you a disc. I'll need some time to set up my software as I recently just got everything on my computer back up and running how I want it. So, you can PM your address and I'll send you a DVD. However, try burning all of the ISO images to different CD's and try doing it yourself. Linux will NOT destroy your Windows partition without you commiting to it yourself, it will NOT. Linux will make you press OK before it does anything.

Regards,

Brandon
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
well i only found the 1 ISO and i went to the ubuntu site and it said download, so i clicked it and downloaded the cd dvd verison of 6.10 and htats the only file it gave me
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
good news! i got it on a DVD and am using hte trial. boot. i am about to install it because it works much mroe smoothly and is also muich faster!:wave:
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
so as im installing it i chose
Resize IDE1 master, partion #1 (hda1) and use free space, and i put it to 40 percent or 43.8 GB is that soudn good. i wanted to give it less but i couldnt figure out how. i tried to manually edit partition but i couldnt figure it out so i hope this works, or that i can edit it latter.. ahh this is the time when i always get nervouse!
 

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Hi

15GB is enough for a Linux distro for average use. More than that is aplenty.
The manual editing of a Linux partition can be done by using GNOME Parted aka GParted.

Which Ubuntu version are you using and is it a full install or a Live CD?
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
umm i think its the live cd. but i choose the install part. do i have to seperate and partition side from ubuntu like before i install it?
 

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Not really. When you run the Live CD by booting from it, you'll be using Ubuntu and seeing what it looks like. In the menu you'll have GParted -- a software that you can then run before installation to create, delete, resize partitions.

This has to be done before the install.
 
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