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Discussion Starter #1
I recently bought a second hand desktop (my first one). Specs:

I7 2600
Gtx 750
8gb ram
350w power supply

After getting everything I need installed, I decided to to run msi afterburner to check my cpu and gpu temperatures. At first the temperatures were very high. At idle it would average at around 55 to 70 degrees. The case had no fans so I added one to the back and kept the side panel off. This brought down the temperature significantly now sitting at 39 to 45 degrees while idle and 65 during light usage (watching YouTube or managing files). However at soon as I began playing games to CPU temperature starts to climb its way up 98 degrees (never going over this). I find this strange as I thought that at extreme temperatures like this that the cpu itself would shut down and also while putting my hands in the case, the air (while warm) is not very hot. This makes me think it's a sensor issue and that maybe the cpu actually isn't hitting those temperatures. GLU temperatures remain at low 30s. Ive applied new thermal paste, made sure the fan on the cpu is installed correctly and I'm not sure what to do at this point.
 

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I am surprised there were no fans in the case. Adding one was good, but two would probably be better. You typically want a good front-to-back "flow" of air through the case. And you want to use the largest fans the case will support. Most support at least 120mm fans, some support 140mm or larger.

Larger fans move much more air at the same RPM. This is good because that also means larger fans can move more air more quietly. I don't like fan noise so less fan noise is always good.

So look at your case again. Your rear fan should be exhausting heated air out. If the front of your case supports a fan, I recommend putting one there, pulling cool air in. If no front fan support, hopefully it will support a 2nd exhaust fan in back. Some cases support "blowhole" or top mounted fans. Those typically work with the Laws of Physics and exhaust heated air out.

Make sure the interior is clean of heat-trapping dust.

Also, it generally is best to run with the side panel on. This creates a chamber the air can flow through - a good thing. When the side panel is off, the rear fan is pulling air from everywhere, including the room. That disrupts and prevents the "flow" you need. You want the rear fan to pull only heated air out from inside the case.

Remember, the CPU fan helps remove the CPU's heat, but it is most efficient at that when it can toss that heat up into the "flow" of cool air through the case. If no flow because the side panel is removed, the heat may linger around the CPU. So check your temps with the side panel on.

If troubleshooting, or if case cooling is insufficient, then I recommend blasting a desk fan into the open case when the panel is removed. Other wise, keep the side panel on.

If your case does not support more than the single fan (or a larger fan) you can look for fans that have a higher CFM rating. But note fans with higher CFM specs often make more fan noise. And I hate fan noise!:(

If your case will not support more or larger fans, that suggests you need a better case. I like Fractal Design cases. They are extremely well designed, well built, come with quality (and quiet!) fans and support many more fans and cooling alternatives. Plus they have nice, removable and washable air filters - a must for all my cases. And last, they are great at suppressing fan noise (did I mention I really hate fan noise?).

As seen here, the i7 2600 has a maximum Tcase spec of 72.6°C. So clearly, your 98°C is too high. "IF" all is working fine, you are not damaging your CPU because it "should" throttle back in speed (and heat generation) to protect itself if it gets too hot. But still, high temps over extended periods of time increases aging of electronics. So you are being wise to be concerned here. :)

Good luck and keep us posted.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I am surprised there were no fans in the case. Adding one was good, but two would probably be better. You typically want a good front-to-back "flow" of air through the case. And you want to use the largest fans the case will support. Most support at least 120mm fans, some support 140mm or larger.

Larger fans move much more air at the same RPM. This is good because that also means larger fans can move more air more quietly. I don't like fan noise so less fan noise is always good.

So look at your case again. Your rear fan should be exhausting heated air out. If the front of your case supports a fan, I recommend putting one there, pulling cool air in. If no front fan support, hopefully it will support a 2nd exhaust fan in back. Some cases support "blowhole" or top mounted fans. Those typically work with the Laws of Physics and exhaust heated air out.

Make sure the interior is clean of heat-trapping dust.

Also, it generally is best to run with the side panel on. This creates a chamber the air can flow through - a good thing. When the side panel is off, the rear fan is pulling air from everywhere, including the room. That disrupts and prevents the "flow" you need. You want the rear fan to pull only heated air out from inside the case.

Remember, the CPU fan helps remove the CPU's heat, but it is most efficient at that when it can toss that heat up into the "flow" of cool air through the case. If no flow because the side panel is removed, the heat may linger around the CPU. So check your temps with the side panel on.

If troubleshooting, or if case cooling is insufficient, then I recommend blasting a desk fan into the open case when the panel is removed. Other wise, keep the side panel on.

If your case does not support more than the single fan (or a larger fan) you can look for fans that have a higher CFM rating. But note fans with higher CFM specs often make more fan noise. And I hate fan noise!:(

If your case will not support more or larger fans, that suggests you need a better case. I like Fractal Design cases. They are extremely well designed, well built, come with quality (and quiet!) fans and support many more fans and cooling alternatives. Plus they have nice, removable and washable air filters - a must for all my cases. And last, they are great at suppressing fan noise (did I mention I really hate fan noise?).

As seen here, the i7 2600 has a maximum Tcase spec of 72.6°C. So clearly, your 98°C is too high. "IF" all is working fine, you are not damaging your CPU because it "should" throttle back in speed (and heat generation) to protect itself if it gets too hot. But still, high temps over extended periods of time increases aging of electronics. So you are being wise to be concerned here. :)

Good luck and keep us posted.
Thanks a lot. Am going to pick up a new case that supports more fans and get a new cpu cooler just incase and for future use. Thanks a lot
 

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If your CPU cooler's fan is still spinning, I would not worry about that now. While pulling the CPU cooler is a relatively easy task, there is a lot of risk of damaging the CPU through mishandling or an accident. And remember, whenever you pull the heatsink off any CPU (or any device that uses a heatsink), the mating surfaces MUST be thoroughly cleaned of old TIM (thermal interface material) and a fresh new layer properly applied. Again, not particularly a difficult task, but lots of opportunities for something to go amiss.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
If your CPU cooler's fan is still spinning, I would not worry about that now. While pulling the CPU cooler is a relatively easy task, there is a lot of risk of damaging the CPU through mishandling or an accident. And remember, whenever you pull the heatsink off any CPU (or any device that uses a heatsink), the mating surfaces MUST be thoroughly cleaned of old TIM (thermal interface material) and a fresh new layer properly applied. Again, not particularly a difficult task, but lots of opportunities for something to go amiss.
I made sure that I cleared all the thermal paste and put new 0aste on while checking the cpu cooler
 

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Well, those sensors are very low-tech and not precision measuring devices by any means. But for monitoring purposes, they really are more like bathroom scales. That is, it really does not matter if they are off by a few pounds as long as they are consistently off by the same amount.

So if your sensor consistently reads ~20°C when your ambient (room) temp is 20° and the system is idle, then no problem.

The problem here is, just because you, as the user are more or less idle, that does not mean the computer is. It is common for Windows to do "housekeeping" chores when the user is idle (or just doing menial tasks). Security programs also take that opportunity to run scans or update their definition files. That's why I put the ~ in front of that 20.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
If your CPU cooler's fan is still spinning, I would not worry about that now. While pulling the CPU cooler is a relatively easy task, there is a lot of risk of damaging the CPU through mishandling or an accident. And remember, whenever you pull the heatsink off any CPU (or any device that uses a heatsink), the mating surfaces MUST be thoroughly cleaned of old TIM (thermal interface material) and a fresh new layer properly applied. Again, not particularly a difficult task, but lots of opportunities for something to go amiss.
 
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