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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, I recently registered here to solve a few problems i've been unable to figure out on my own. Here's the first, and most serious - my core. It's a quad-core i7 2600, and has been consistantly running on very high temperatures right from boot. (usually around 90-100c, or around 200f) Sometimes I even get a 'CPU temperature' error message in BIOS, but it prompts me to go into startup. I do not believe the core has been overclocked, as I didn't touch those settings in BIOS.

I built this machine myself about two months ago, I don't think anything was wrong. The heatsink came with pre-applied thermal paste on the bottom and is firmly secured, so I doubt it is that.

Does anyone have any suggestions? Over the last few weeks i've been wracking my brain over these issues and coming up blank.
 

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How old is the PC?
Have you checked/cleaned the CPU heatsink for dust buildup?
PC Specs?
Pre-Built Brand & Model Number
Custom Built-Brand & Model of Mobo-CPU-RAM-Graphics-PSU.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
How old is the PC?
Have you checked/cleaned the CPU heatsink for dust buildup?
PC Specs?
Pre-Built Brand & Model Number
Custom Built-Brand & Model of Mobo-CPU-RAM-Graphics-PSU.
The machine is around two months old, built it myself. I cleaned it last about 3 weeks ago.
here are the specs:

ASUS P8V68-V mobo
Core i7 quad 2600
ASUS 560ti GPU
16gb of Kingston DDR3 RAM
Corsair 750w PSU
60gb SSD
x2 1.5tb HDD
Generic wireless card
Generic sound card
 

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If I'm understanding correctly this has been a problem since the PC was first built?
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
If I'm understanding correctly this has been a problem since the PC was first built?
That's right, yes. When I first booted it up and looked into BIOS, the temperature was abnormally high. I did so under the supervision of an experienced technician, and he thought it was a display error or something unimportant. I don't think it has impared the computer much, but latley it has begun to slow down slightly, and i've begun to worry.
 

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Overclocked or not, a temperature of 90°C is way too high for any processor and can result in permanent damage to it. You should not be running the system until this issue is addressed.

Confirm the simple stuff, first:
Temp monitor: Where are you getting this reading. BIOS will be most accurate. Some applications will often give incorrect readings.
CPU cooler: confirm all four corners are down and locked. The cooler should not rock or wiggle when grasped.
Fans: all operating? How are they controlled?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Overclocked or not, a temperature of 90°C is way too high for any processor and can result in permanent damage to it. You should not be running the system until this issue is addressed.

Confirm the simple stuff, first:
Temp monitor: Where are you getting this reading. BIOS will be most accurate. Some applications will often give incorrect readings.
CPU cooler: confirm all four corners are down and locked. The cooler should not rock or wiggle when grasped.
Fans: all operating? How are they controlled?
I've noted the temperature through a program called Real Temp, and BIOS. The heatsink is secure, and all fans are functional. I think they're controled automaticly.

EDIT: Just popped open the case to double check the fans, my frontal intake one isn't functioning. How would one rectify this? And, would that have caused the high temperature on boot?
 

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Does your case have the Mobo mounting plate cut out the back so you can see the mounting area of the CPU to determine that all four of the CPU legs are securely locked into the Mobo?
You could try cleaning the old thermal pad from the CPU & Heatsink and apply new paste.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Does your case have the Mobo mounting plate cut out the back so you can see the mounting area of the CPU to determine that all four of the CPU legs are securely locked into the Mobo?
You could try cleaning the old thermal pad from the CPU & Heatsink and apply new paste.
I had a look behind and I could see the little pegs, they all seem fine save for one that might be a little iffy. I'll take off the heatsink and resecure it tomorow, when i'm more alert. (Almost 1am, 26c out and 90% humidity. yuck!)
 

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You should see the black part sticking into and spreading the white parts when the legs are properly secured.
When you remove the heatsink you will have to thoroughly clean the old thermal pad from the heatsink & CPU and apply fresh thermal paste.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
You should see the black part sticking into and spreading the white parts when the legs are properly secured.
When you remove the heatsink you will have to thoroughly clean the old thermal pad from the heatsink & CPU and apply fresh thermal paste.
Alrighty, now that i'm more awake and less prone to killing my machine with ESD, I had another look and it turns out i'm a fool, and one pin was improperly secured, and one chasis fan connector was in the wrong place. I fixed both of these, and everything seems to be in order now, with my CPU now idiling at around 50-60c.

Early days now, and I may still have some troubles in BIOS. A BIG thank you to the both of you, your expertise really helped me out here.
 

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Glad you found those issues and don't be too hard on yourself as we all make mistakes.
50-50C at idle is too hot. Did you pull the heatsink from the CPU? If so, you will need to redo the thermal paste.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Glad you found those issues and don't be too hard on yourself as we all make mistakes.
50-50C at idle is too hot. Did you pull the heatsink from the CPU? If so, you will need to redo the thermal paste.
I didn't remove it, but it was jiggled around some. I'll go buy some thermal paste when I can next get to a computer store and put a bit more on there, Intel seemed to be a little stingy with their pre-applied paste.
 

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Remember, you do not use a lot. The compound is there only to enhance the transfer of heat. Use too much and it begins to act as an insulator.
 

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I didn't remove it, but it was jiggled around some. I'll go buy some thermal paste when I can next get to a computer store and put a bit more on there, Intel seemed to be a little stingy with their pre-applied paste.
Whenever the heatsink is removed or disturbed the thermal paste needs to be replaced. "Adding to it" will only cause more problems. You need to thoroughly clean the old thermal pad from the heatsink & CPU with 90% alcohol and reapply new paste.
Arctic Silver, Inc. - Instructions
 
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