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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My old computer's getting a little long in the tooth, so I want to build a new one.
It would mostly be used for surfing, downloading & video encoding, but I occasionally use Land Desktop. I'd be using Civil 3D 2009.
Here's what I'm thinking of:

CPU: Intel E7400 C2D - Good price ($155 CAD) & high clock speeed
Heatsink: Arctic Cooling Freezer 7 - $39 - any good? Is there a better choice?
Mobo: Here's where I know nothing. I was thinking of an Asus P5QL-EM. It looks like it has HDMI out & I'd like to avoid buying a VC if possible. $135
Memory: 4gb Crucial PC6400 - $54

For a total of $383 before taxes.

It's been a while since I built my HTPC, so I'm not familiar with the current offerings, especially Intel. Would I be better off going with AMD?
I've got a 500gb RE2 WD HDD laying around & I'd use the DVD drives from my current setup. My PSU (I can't remember the make) has been very stable & quiet, so I'd reuse that also. If I have problems, then I'd buy another.
Since I don't have any current experience, any help would be greatly appreciated.
 

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If you don't need HDMI on the Mobo, the P5Q Pro would be a better coice. It uses the P45 chipset. $115
The Arctic Cooling Freezer 7 is a very good unit but stock heatsing/fan will be fine.
For CAD and/or serious video editing I would suggest a Quad-Core CPU if your budget allows.
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131299
Better choice for RAM; CORSAIR 4GB (2 x 2GB) DDR2 800 $47
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820145184
Be certain the PSU you have is a *QUALITY* unit.
 

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The retail Intel CPU comes with a thermal pad pre-applied so you can save the $9 on the AS.
 

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What one needs to know about...the relation of the negative effects of heat on the computer...That can be caused by the power supply.

Manufacturers test their PSU's at a set temperature...from this their rating is determined... for most this No. is 25 degrees Celsius...which falls short of the temperature that most computers are capable of achieving.

Given that a PSU will actually lose 2-5 watts per one degree of heat above the 25 Degree Celsius testing temperature...coupled with the fact that computers tend to run at 10 degrees higher than room temperature... In the summer time when the room temperature can easily reach 80 degrees F... your computer will be running at 33 Degrees C. or 90 Degrees F.

So the...math can make...your 500 watt power supply into a 460 watt unit.

In addition to this...what needs to be taken into account is that each degree that your computer components are operating at...under powered...adds more heat to the equation.

Consider also...the possibility...that ratings given by the manufacturer of single components...such as graphics cards...need to be treated with skepticism... Manufacturers may minimize support issues and under rate the power required...in order to make a larger profit.

The above has not taken into account...the issue of high quality vs poor quality units...Power supplies convert voltages from wall outlets to lower levels used by the PC. During this conversion, some power is lost as heat. The efficiency level of the PSU determines how much extra power must be put into the power supply to run the PC. A high quality PSU can help reduce the noise and heat generated within a computer system. The higher the efficiency rating the less heat the PSU has to deal with.

Therefore heat is the computers enemy...The hotter the temperature your PSU is forced to run at...the poorer the supply of power the rest of the components will receive...which has been known to lead to such things as crashes, freezing, rebooting, BSOD’s, and video distortion, as well as partial and complete failure of other components.

The fact is very few PSU’s are capable of producing the wattage that the companies advertise.

For a very good comprehension of recommended brand names, wattage, and models in listed categories...Plus much more...check out this link. http://www.techsupportforum.com/f210/power-supply-information-and-selection-192217.html
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the replies.
I've got an OCZ Stealth Xtreme 600w in my HTPC, but it's pretty noisy, so I was going to buy a quieter one & use the OCZ in the CAD computer. I bought the 500w model, but it was very noisy, so I RMA'd it & they sent me the 600w model. Would this be suitable?
I don't really have the money for a quad core, so I'll probably stick with the C2D. I mainly process survey files & don't do any 3D modelling or rendering, so it should suffice.
I think I'll take your advice & get the PQ5 Pro & a dedicated video card. I'm not set on the mobo manufacturer, so if you think there are better ones at around the same price, I'm open.
 
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