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ok i have chosen my linux. i am downloading a cd sized preview of ubuntu
now what would i need program wise?
i heard something about wine??? umm i use wireless internet so do i need any secial program? umm i also use msn is there a linux friendy version?

umm i just need alot of info. this would help alot. just recomend anything i would need to download. thanx


i probly should word all that better, sory if it comes out desperate but i am desperate to switch to linux

:wave:
 

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Mentally divergent
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It's OK
Of course you're a little nervous - it's all a big black pit of questions and you don't even know where to start.

You probably downloaded the LiveCD. First thing to do is you need to convert the .iso to a bootable CD, and lots of people start right out screwing up with that. If you just copy the download to a CD it won't work. You need a program that knows how to create a bootable CD. Windows won't do it. Any of the commercial burn programs can. There are free programs, such as IMgBurn that also convert. NTI, the program that came with my Sony burner, is incredibly simple. I double-click on the download and NTI starts up. It knows what to do with the download. All I have to do is tell it to burn slowly, not at max speed.

Do you have a spare PC (or a spare HDD) that you plan to dedicate to this experiment? I think that's a much better idea than diving into dual-booting your Windows PC when you're new to this. Don't get me wrong, dual-boot is certainly achievable but there are risks any time you start manipulating the data on your HDD.

Wireless internet can be pretty easy, especially since it's been at or near the top of the "to do" list for Linux developers lately. However, some wireless chipsets are not well supported. Intel wireless chipsets are the easiest, Broadcom has a reputation as being the worst. So to get started you may want to plug directly into your router with a cable. As far as special programs for wireless, you might need to futz with ndiswrapper, a program designed to make Windows wireless drivers work under Linux, but let's assume for now that you won't. If your chipsets cooperate, everything you need is there in the basic install.

You can try and connect to the Internet from the LiveCD. Thing is, just because you can or cannot connect from the LiveCD doesn't mean you will or won't be able to when it's actually installed. I've heard of people who could connect from the LiveCD but couldn't after it was installed. And vice versa. Doesn't make any sense to me but there you go.

Let's say it all works and you can go online. I guess you can visit the MSN website if you want to. Boo hiss
The MSN software obviously will not install to a Linux PC and you're better off for it.

I wouldn't worry about WINE for now. WINE is a program that's intended to allow you to run Windows programs on Linux. It's sort of a translator. From what I've read, it's not a perfect answer, and people only use it when they have no other choice.

Linux is a fantastic OS. When you hear people say "Linux isn't ready for the desktop" they just don't know, or don't want to know, what they're talking about. The biggest problems right now revolve around hardware that doesn't work and manufacturers who haven't gotten the message yet that they need to write drivers and/or cooperate with the development community to create open source drivers.

For instance, if you have a Canon printer it may not work. Or if you have an ATI video card inside the PC it might not work either. That's not a reflection on Linux, it just means the manufacturers only care about making their stuff work under Windows.

About all you can do is move forward, and if you hit a wall ask for help.
 

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James, I'm a Linux noob, and as Bartender stated, Dedicating a second HD to Linux is the way to go. Setting up partitions on your Windows drive for Linux, gets a lot of noobs in trouble and can very well hose your Windows install BUT it's still very doable and many folks do it with no problems. I bought a cheap 80 gig drive just for Linux and couldn't be happier with this arrangement. I recently bought a Canon printer and scanner prior to delving into Linux. The Canon printer is useless, unless I purchase TurboPrint and I have limited functionality with the scanner (I can scan an image if necessary). The best bet here, is to purchase an HP combination rig. To HP's credit, they have Linux drivers, also many of the distros will run HP out of the box. It's a steep learning curve, but it's been and continues to be fun. I've found that there isn't much in the way of apps, that Linux doesn't have. If your distro doesn't have it, it's easily dl'd and installed. Right now, I need to understand the terminal, as occasionally it needs to be used for tweaks and some installations, but heck, It's challenging and still fun. I can see where Linux can be one's only OS if they aren't locked in to a particular Windows app. Have fun and perseverance. It'll pay off!
Bronson7
 

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Oh, as a side note, there are lisings of compatable hardware on several Linux sites. You may want to check those out.
Bronson7
 

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Mentally divergent
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Something else to think about - modern full-featured Linux distros use either the GNOME desktop environment (DE) or the KDE desktop environment. By desktop environment, I mean what you see and interact with. The way the panels are set up, the way the computer reacts to single or double clicks, how menus appear, etc. Of course, you can tweak on any of these without limit, but there are still fundamental differences in the GNOME and KDE experience. Ubuntu uses GNOME.

This is another very weird concept for people who are only used to Windows. You can have the exact same Linux kernel operating in the background, and have either KDE or GNOME running on top as the DE. The computer will act and look differently depending on which one you use. Then there are the "lighter weight" DE's such as Xfce, fluxbox, etc. but let's not get sidetracked.

If you have broadband and really like the way Ubuntu's working for you, you can use Synaptic Package Manager to download/install the entire KDE desktop (look for kubuntu-desktop), then you can flip back and forth by using the "Sessions" option when starting up.

Or you can download a popular KDE distro such as Kubuntu (Ubuntu's KDE-based sibling) or Mint KDE or MEPIS or....

The Mint servers are busy right now and probly will be for a week or two, but I want to check out the full KDE version of their latest offering, Daryana. Note that you need a DVD burner for their full version - it's too big for a CD.

You owe it to yourself to at least plink around in a KDE DE for a few days and see whether you like GNOME better or not.
 

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I've been reading a lil bit about installing UBUNTU,I want to try it out with a live cd but I was wondering is it too difficult to actually install ubuntu alongside XP ? Thanks much!
 

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Well, it's not very difficult but it can be confusing the first few times. Mostly because of the new terminology you'll see that won't make sense. Kind of like building a house foundation. Not rocket science once you've done it a few times but good luck with no experience.

Ask yourself this - could you rebuild your Windows installation if things went ker-blooey? Do you have the resources to make an image of your HDD?
Back up your personal data, go into BIOS and make sure the PC will boot from a CD (and turn off power-saving mode while you're in there), defrag Windows several times, then try tossing the Ubuntu CD in and use the "Guided - resize HDD" process. You'll get to that step after you go thru setting up the keyboard and setting the clock. Don't worry if you don't get the clock right - you can reset it easily later.
There are videos on YouTube if you have access to broadband.

You know what? The LiveCD is handy for taking a test drive, but the alternate-install CD is better and more reliable for installing. Just a coupla days ago I tried installing Kubuntu from the LiveCD and it quit about 24% of the way into installing the OS. Just stopped. The install window disappeared from the screen, then everything disappeared off the screen and it just sat there with the HDD LED indicating 100%. This was on a PC with plenty of RAM. Downloaded the Kubuntu alt install and it went fine.

Don't be scared off by the alt-install. I don't think it's any harder to follow than the LiveCD.
 

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Vetustior Humo
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Regarding Linux: here's what I've done. I built a new comp and didn't want to spend the $$ on a new Windows OS - Vista was about to come out -so I did a little research and ended up with Ubuntu.

I loaded and ran Ubuntu for over a year. It was not without its challenges but with a little patience and some advice from the good folks here at TSF I was able to make it do whatever I needed. (I'm not into games so the lack of high level games written for Linux does not bother me.) Then I moved to PCLOS and somehow lost my Ubuntu. I'm sure I could get it back but PCLOS is fine too.

Just recently I needed to load Windows XP (so that I can trouble shoot my other computers while I'm away from home for an extended period.) And since I was familiar with Linux I decided to "dual boot". All I did was back up all my Linux data (not much actually) to DVD. I then wiped the HD totally clean. I then loaded XP onto one of 3 partitions on the HD. (XP saw the entire drive but I just told it to use only 2/3 of it and leave the rest alone - it was happy with that.) Then I went back in and loaded PCLOS onto the unused partition. I had no issues whatsoever.

Now when I start the machine, "Grub" loads right after the BIOS does and offers me the option of which OS I want to use. It couldn't have been easier.

So while it's entirely possible to use a Linux OS's for just about any application, its also not that big of a deal to have both. Just remember Windows doesn't like seeing another OS on the comp but Linux doesn't care. So load Windows first then use another HD (the best solution IMO but I didn't have one around) or the spare space on your main one. Either way will work.

Good luck. Have fun and patience and you'll be fine. Ask for help whenever you need to.

regards,
yustr
 

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i recommend that you read Linux for non geeks by Rickford Grant it explains fedora linux in easy to understand format and even comes with 2 linux cds to install.
 
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