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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hello
I currently have my main router set up and working perfectly, and from it I have a router extending the WIFI range which also works great.
Now, the problem is this, i need a third router set-up in my room to extend my wifi range since my wifi extender is about to die ( drops connection and doesn't keep it stable ).

I set up the router as per various guides and it works just fine, until after some time it doesn't give new IPs and nothing can connect to it. This is where I'm stuck. My main router sets the IPs ( or, it's supposed to ) but this one won't work properly after some time and I have completely reset it, start over, and will work for a time until it gives the same problem again

Looking forward to solutions, thank you :)

EDIT: Main router is DIR-842
Secondary is unimportant since it's causing no issues
Third that is causing issues is Tp-link WR740N
Main and third are connected via ethernet cable, same as main and second.
 

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Team Manager - Networking , Moderator - Micros
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You don't connect multiple routers together. All you're doing is creating a network mess.
You can however turn a 2nd router into a switch or wireless access point by turning DHCP OFF on the 2nd device then running an ethernet cable from a LAN port on your router to a LAN port on the 2nd device.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
You don't connect multiple routers together. All you're doing is creating a network mess.
You can however turn a 2nd router into a switch or wireless access point by turning DHCP OFF on the 2nd device then running an ethernet cable from a LAN port on your router to a LAN port on the 2nd device.
that's what I am doing :)

Router A is main, Router B is second currently connected working fine and Router C is the one running out of IPs.
I disable DHCP and NAT on C, yet, after a while it just stops working.
 

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Team Manager - Networking , Moderator - Micros
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Again, you don't connect more than one router to your network. From what you're telling me, you now have 2 DHCP servers running at the same time. None of the problems you're describing are unusual because you don't have your network set up properly. Use ONE router, configure the other 2 as access points with DHCP turned off and with static LAN IP addresses outside your router's DHCP scope.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Again, you don't connect more than one router to your network. From what you're telling me, you now have 2 DHCP servers running at the same time. None of the problems you're describing are unusual because you don't have your network set up properly. Use ONE router, configure the other 2 as access points with DHCP turned off and with static LAN IP addresses outside your router's DHCP scope.
I have DHCP disabled but I don't see AP mode.
My main router has DHCP range from 100 to 200, static addresses for router 1, 2, 3 are 0.1 , 0.2 , 0.3
Besides these settings, what else needs to be done?
Router A is the only one giving out addresses, the other 2 have DHCP disabled and lan ip address set as written above. Or do i need to set up the connection type as Static IP? If so, which settings should i pick for subnet mask, default gateway and DNS
 

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Team Manager - Networking , Moderator - Micros
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1 - That's fine. Some routers have a pre-configured setting you can select called Access Point mode, but it's not necessary. Once you disable DHCP in a router you turn a router into a network switch or simply an access point.
2 - perfect. As long as you set the static LAN IP address for device 2 & 3 first, then disable DHCP. Assigning a static IP allows you to easily log back into the 2 access points and make changes as needed or to configure wireless access later.
3 - Nothing. Connect an ethernet cable from a LAN port on your router to a LAN port on your first access point. Power cycle your router and test your connectivity between all devices before moving on.
4 - After that you can run another ethernet cable to the 2nd access point and test connectivity from there.

Router A is the only device on your network that should be handing out IP addresses. Since you disabled DHCP on the other 2 devices and converted them to access points, they will automatically get all their DNS info, etc from Router A. Once your network is properly configured you can troubleshoot one segment at a time.
 

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I've had up to three secondary routers configured as an AP on a network, it works fine if you do it like Fred suggests. I actually used the same network SSID on all of them but different channels, usually the switch between them was seamless.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I set it up and for now, it seems to be working just fine. I'll leave it as it is for a few days and see what happens with it
If I have a problem I'll come back, if nothing arises, I'll mark it as solved. Thank you
 
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