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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The Host machine is running Vista Ultimate 32-bit, and I've gone over the settings at least 20 times over a period of 2 days.

I've tried to connect 3 different Clients to the Host. 2 were running XP Pro, and the 3rd was running Win2K Pro.

All result in the exact same situation. The LAN has "limited connectivity", and the IP Address will not renew.

The Host is connected via PCI Wireless to a Router, and from there to fiber-optic modem (AT&T's U-Verse). Host computer connects to the internet perfectly; the Client computers are the problem.

I've tried 2 different Cat5 cables. DHCP is enabled on all the machines; I have NOT tried manually setting-up an IP address, because first I know even less about how to do that, and second because the Client computer is going to change frequently and I need DHCP working.

I don't really know what other information is relevant. All the adapters show up good in Device Manager.
 

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I dont have much experience with ICS so sorry if this isnt much help.
If you are plugging a client directly into the host you might need a cross-over cat5 cable, not a straight through.(Not 100% about this)

Can you show me a copy of an ipconfig /all from the host machine to see its ip address for the LAN interface?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Microsoft Windows [Version 6.0.6000]
Copyright (c) 2006 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

C:\Users\CherryQ3>ipconfig/all

Windows IP Configuration

Host Name . . . . . . . . . . . . : CherryQ3-PC
Primary Dns Suffix . . . . . . . :
Node Type . . . . . . . . . . . . : Hybrid
IP Routing Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
WINS Proxy Enabled. . . . . . . . : No
DNS Suffix Search List. . . . . . : gateway.2wire.net

Wireless LAN adapter Wireless Network Connection:

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . : gateway.2wire.net
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : U.S. Robotics Wireless 802.11g PCI Adapte
r
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-14-C1-1E-7F-C0
DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::11f9:b728:5355:a12e%11(Preferred)
IPv4 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.66(Preferred)
Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.255.0
Lease Obtained. . . . . . . . . . : Monday, June 16, 2008 4:59:59 PM
Lease Expires . . . . . . . . . . : Tuesday, June 17, 2008 5:00:59 PM
Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.254
DHCP Server . . . . . . . . . . . : 192.168.1.254
DHCPv6 IAID . . . . . . . . . . . : 151000257
DHCPv6 Client DUID. . . . . . . . : 00-01-00-01-0F-E7-14-33-00-14-C1-1E-7F-C0

DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : fe80::11f9:b728:5355:a12e%11
192.168.1.254
NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Enabled

Ethernet adapter Local Area Connection:

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Realtek RTL8169/8110 Family PCI Gigabit E
thernet NIC (NDIS 6.0)
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-01-29-D5-9D-BA
DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : Yes
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::a186:a3a4:3293:8e2f%10(Preferred)
Autoconfiguration IPv4 Address. . : 169.254.142.47(Preferred)
Subnet Mask . . . . . . . . . . . : 255.255.0.0
Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . :
DHCPv6 IAID . . . . . . . . . . . : 218104105
DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : fec0:0:0:ffff::1%1
fec0:0:0:ffff::2%1
fec0:0:0:ffff::3%1
NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Enabled

Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 6:

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . : gateway.2wire.net
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Microsoft ISATAP Adapter
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-00-00-00-00-00-00-E0
DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::5efe:192.168.1.66%13(Preferred)
Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . :
DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : fe80::11f9:b728:5355:a12e%11
192.168.1.254
NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Disabled

Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 7:

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : Teredo Tunneling Pseudo-Interface
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 02-00-54-55-4E-01
DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
IPv6 Address. . . . . . . . . . . : 2001:0:4137:9e50:2897:1de1:3f57:febd(Pref
erred)
Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::2897:1de1:3f57:febd%8(Preferred)
Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . : ::
NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Disabled

Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 9:

Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : isatap.{EBEE3427-BA6F-4AD6-A28E-7BCACBF2E
F57}
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-00-00-00-00-00-00-E0
DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes
Link-local IPv6 Address . . . . . : fe80::5efe:169.254.142.47%12(Preferred)
Default Gateway . . . . . . . . . :
DNS Servers . . . . . . . . . . . : fec0:0:0:ffff::1%1
fec0:0:0:ffff::2%1
fec0:0:0:ffff::3%1
NetBIOS over Tcpip. . . . . . . . : Disabled

Tunnel adapter Local Area Connection* 10:

Media State . . . . . . . . . . . : Media disconnected
Connection-specific DNS Suffix . :
Description . . . . . . . . . . . : 6TO4 Adapter
Physical Address. . . . . . . . . : 00-00-00-00-00-00-00-E0
DHCP Enabled. . . . . . . . . . . : No
Autoconfiguration Enabled . . . . : Yes

C:\Users\CherryQ3>
 

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I would try assigning a static IP to the Realtek card. Give it 192.168.0.1 and subnet mask255.255.255.0. I am fairly sure with ICS your host machine should act as a dhcp server and router. So you should not have to set static IP on the client. Although you may have to do ipconfig /release and then renew.

See if that helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
All right. Thanks, I'll try.

Not sure why I would need to assign a static IP address to the Host. It has an IP address already that does not appear to have changed since I started, but I'm willing to try it in order to see what happens.

I was looking at the remaining configuration options that I am not certain of, and am wondering if the problem might be with either the DNS or WINS settings.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I set the Vista (Host's) IP to 192.168.0.1 and got the same result ("Limited Connection").

I think the problem might be in the DNS settings.

How are they supposed to be configured ?

I've tried a 4th computer (XP client) to connect to the Vista (Host) machine via ICS and it won't connect either, so the problem has GOT to be with the Vista machine, somehow.
 

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Like I said I haven't really had much experience with ICS, I prefer to use a switch to connect clients to the router. However I don't think DNS settings should be a problem. Your dns server is your router (192.168.1.254) and is only needed to translate names into ip addresses. This may be an issue later but your first proirity is to establish connectivity between the host and the client.

Did you make sure you are using a crossover cable instead of a straight through?
(if you are plugged directly between the host and clients network card)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I can make a crossover cable if I have to, but nothing that I have read over the last 3 days has indicated that a crossover cable is necessary.

I did read something about WinXP needing to have some kind of "topology" driver installed in order to connect to a Vista machine via ICS, but this seems very counterintuitive. I find it difficult to believe that they are going to make Vista incompatible with XP without this added "feature".

But, as an experiment, I did install the recommended protocol (or whatever the correct word is) and not only did it not work, but it also made the XP machine's "repair internet connection" function not work properly and crashed when it was run.

I'm still needing help here, and am running out of ideas & options.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks for the additional help, I appreciate it very much.

It's pretty simple. No router involved, just a straight shot with Cat5 cable from the Client's NIC to the Host's NIC.

All the clients have been either XP, or Win2000. The Host has always been the on-board LAN. Pretty generic, too. Like a Realtek.

I'm wondering if there may not be some BIOS setting on the Host computer that is disabled and preventing connection. I make a habit of disabling anything & everything I don't use. I did verify that the on-board LAN was enabled, and it shows up good in Hardware Manager. I've even uninstalled & reinstalled the drivers for it. But I'm wondering if there may not be some other, secondary BIOS setting that is causing the problem.
 

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K i understand now. :smile: Try this.

1. To connect the client to the host, you need a crossover cat5e cable. (diagram attached)

2. DHCP will not work in this situation because you don't have a DHCP server running to give the client an IP address automatically. You can make the VISTA machine a DHCP server by downloading and running: http://www.bestvistadownloads.com/software/t-free-alax-info-dhcp-server-download-bqujpcmy.html.

I've never used it, but it should do the job. :grin:

OR you could just give the client machines a static IP address. I know that you don't want to do this, but you would only have to do this once for each client and that would be them setup.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
ICS is not enabled in that IPCONFIG, FWIW.
How can you tell ? It says it's enabled in Vista's Network and Sharing. Or at least it was.

I found an article that says that ICS between XP & Vista is buggy, and that you should set up a bridge connection.

It looks like I have a good bridge between the on-board LAN card and the PCI wireless card, but the client computers still cannot connect.

Does it matter what the authentication settings (something like "802. something or other) should be ? If so, how should they be set on both machines ?
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
K i understand now. :smile: Try this.

1. To connect the client to the host, you need a crossover cat5e cable. (diagram attached)

2. DHCP will not work in this situation because you don't have a DHCP server running to give the client an IP address automatically. You can make the VISTA machine a DHCP server by downloading and running: http://www.bestvistadownloads.com/software/t-free-alax-info-dhcp-server-download-bqujpcmy.html.

I've never used it, but it should do the job. :grin:

OR you could just give the client machines a static IP address. I know that you don't want to do this, but you would only have to do this once for each client and that would be them setup.
Okay I'm still struggling with this, and I intend to win.

1.) I'm about ready to break down and build a crossover cable. I am resistant to the idea because it seems to me that Vista should be able to handle a straight connection from a client computer. Everyone else seems to be able to do it. I thought that's what ICs was for, anyways.

2.) I installed the software, and it appears to be running normally. When I connect a client to the Vista "DHCP Server", the software reports that it's there, and says that it's given it an IP address. However, from the client's computer, it says that the LAN is "limited" when configured to "auto". If I set the Client's IP Address manually to the one that the software SAYS it was given, the client's O/S reports an IP conflict. If I manually set the IP Address of the Client to something other than the one automatically given to it by the software, the Client says it's connected and looks normal, but still cannot connect to the internet through the Host computer. The client's (2 different computers) report packets being transfered though, and I don't know how to interpret that.

3.) I woke up in the middle of the night last night (insomnia) and started messing with it. I enabled a bunch of the Internet Explorer settings like "SSL 2.0" etc... and suddenly it all started working. Then I messed with something else (I was half asleep) and it quit working. I've messed with it all day today and can't get it working again.

The primary purpose of this is to set up the Host so that it can simulate a LAN connection, so that I can verify that the Client's computer (which will change constantly) has the ability to connect via LAN. The host connects to the internet via wireless, and that is why it cannot change.

4.) Also, while playing around, I mananged to bridge the on-board NIC (LAN) with the fully-functional wireless NIC (US Robotics PCI wireless) and it appears to be fully functional. Only I can't get any computers to connect through it.

5.) I'm still uncertain how important all the DNS settings are. There are various sub-settings and I don't know which is supposed to be set where.

6.) Is the LMHOST setting important ? I've disabled it, and don't know if it matters one way or the other.

7.) Both a Win2K and a WinXP machine claim that they cannot renew the IP Address when the "repair" function is run. I figure this is important, but do not know what it means.

Thanks for the help so far, and please stay with me. I intend to win this one and refuse to give up.
 

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isn't it easier just to connect the client computer directly to the router? instead of waiting for ICS to fail as usual?
Then your router will be acting as the DHCP server, and you can then just literally, plug n play..
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
isn't it easier just to connect the client computer directly to the router? instead of waiting for ICS to fail as usual?
Then your router will be acting as the DHCP server, and you can then just literally, plug n play..
The router is in another room, more than 50 ft away. I do my computer work here, and connect wirelessly. So any other computer that I want to connect via Cat5 LAN needs to be done through this computer.

However, I do have the Linksys Router leftover from the 2 months when I was trying out Vonage. There is a way to do a "loop-back" and use it as a hub, but I've forgotten how to do it.

Spent about 4 hours again today, changing settings and trying to tweak this thing into functionality, to no effect. At one point, the "Bridge" option was working fairly reliably, but I started messing with it, trying to figure out which settings were "mandatory" for connection and which ones were "optional", but again the thing quit working and I've been unable to get it to work correctly.

However, I am getting a better understanding of the various Networking options available, and am wondering which would be "best" for my purpose, which is to set up a (more or less) "permanent" ability to plug in a computer and test it's LAN functionality by connecting it to the internet through my Vista Host computer. As I (currently) understand them, they are:

1.) ICS - which I've never been able to get working.
2.) Alax.Info DHCP Server - which has worked once, but I can't get to work again.
3.) A network Bridge - which has also worked once, but also cannot get to work again.
4.) Making some use of this Lynksys router.
5.) Making a Cross-over cable. I'd do this, if I knew for sure it would work. Seems to me the settings issues might prevent a cross-over cable from working correctly also.

Which of the above would be the best/most reliable ?

Also, I have noticed that the client computers seem to consistantly report that there is a IP Address "conflict", as if DHCP has issued an IP Address, but doesn't recognize the computer that was given the IP as being the computer that got it. Do the IP Addresses assigned by DHCP remain "stored" after a re-boot ? If DHCP gives one computer an IP address, and the cable is plugged into another computer, will that result in this type of error ?
 

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K you now have two options:

1. Make use of your linksys router. Put this in between the host and the client. This will work with straight through cable.

2. As I said before, make a cross-over cable to connect the client and host. NO MATTER what you do in windows, it is physically impossible to get this working without a cross over because the way the pins are laid out on the ethernet card. Here's more help from a VISTA website.

http://windowshelp.microsoft.com/Windows/en-US/help/da25b51f-8c3d-e025-74aa-1fa3f29f6cdd1033.mspx

Try both of the above before trying anything else or your just wasting days and days trying to get this working.
 
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