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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just got a new Dell laptop and can't get online without the ethernet cord. It has a Dell wireless 1500 minicard and I'm told by Dell that it's to fast for my current verizon equipment. Modem/router is a westell 327W. Any suggestions as to how to use the wireless? So far neither Dell or Verizon has been able to get me running.
 

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That's right. They said I had a "n" mode wireless card in the computer and the router was only a "G" mode. I don't know what any of that means but I went to my brothers house, he has comcast, and was able to connect with no trouble. I've since spoken to verizon and they are sending me a westell 6100 modem. I'll need to get a router and they tell me it should work. :4-dontkno :4-dontkno :4-dontkno :4-dontkno
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Correction. The computer is not to fast, it's the wireless card that apparently transmits to fast.
 

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And that's incorrect as well. Obviously, the folks at Dell or Verizon don't understand how wireless networks work, or backward compatibility.

Your 802.11n (actually draft n, the standard isn't approved yet) should be able to connect to any 802.11b, 802.11g, or 802.11n network.

I've connected 802.11n equipped machines to my routers here, both are 802.11g, an SMC and an ActionTec model.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Not sure what your talking about but after being on the phone about six hours with both dell & verizon, getting different info from 2 different tech's from the same company, and even having a conference call between the two I'm still not online.
 

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Well, what johnwill is saying is that there are different kinds of wireless networks. 802.11 stands for the wireless protocol, so if you see that, you can bet that someone is talking about a wireless network. The three main types are g, b and this new pre-n network. They are actually listed chronologically like this: b, g and n. If I have a wireless g card, I can communicate with a b network and a g network, if I have a wireless n card, I should be able to communicate with a b network, g network and n network. If I have a b card, I can only communicate with b. Your wireless G network router means that the card connecting to it must have a wireless G capability.

If you had a wirless B card, it would not work with the router.

I can't imagine why it doesn't want to connect, I would ask them "Is my wireless card 802.11G compatible?" If they say yes, then you should be able to connect to that router and the problem is in their court. It sounds to me like they are trying to accomodate you by sending you some different equipment, at least they didn't shrug you off.
 
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