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Team Manager - Networking , Moderator - Micros
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I'll say it again... It's bad advice to recommend a home user or someone with limited networking experience start daisy chaining routers together on different subnets, when there is absolutely no need to do it and the person giving or receiving the advice doesn't fully understand the implications down the line. A common example would be when a person starts connecting other devices to the new router such as printers, game consoles, computer game servers, security cams, etc., and needs to either open ports for those devices or access them while connected to the other router. Then we'll get a new thread here asking "Why can't I access XYZ on my network."... 2 pages into the thread the poster will admit to connecting a 2nd router because they read it on the internet. I hate to see people make things more difficult than they need to be and some of the advice above does just that.

Tomohawk's original post wasn't an enterprise level networking question about locking down, securing or preventing access to a single box or server from other computers on the network. It was about extending his existing network. A note on using "repeaters" - they generally cut your throughput speed in half, where an ethernet cable running to a 2nd access point will run at full network speed and offers the best possible performance outcome.

Yes, you can convert a router into a wireless access point or a switch. Good for you if you understand the process well enough to do it correctly. If an ISP is replacing a customer's router with a new one, it's likely the old router is outdated or operates at slower speeds than the new device. So by keeping that router in the chain, you're slowing down the network speed of your devices connected to it. If the other router does turn out to be outdated or doesn't have a recent firmware update, you run the risk of adding an insecure device to your network, such as those that haven't been patched for WPA2 security flaws. Or, spend $50 on a current, dual band wireless access point with gigabit wired ports. I'm not going to let this thread go sideways. If Tomohawk needs more info I'm sure he'll post back.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Thank you for the comprehensive response Fred Garvin. If I could buy a $50 access point in Ireland, then maybe I could have saved everybody a lot of exertion, albeit that all responses are very much appreciated.
As I'm not experienced enough to sort through all the arguments myself, can I be extremely cheeky and ask if somebody could have a look for me on www.amazon.co.uk and select the lowest price access point that will allow me to do the following:-
  1. Connect to it from my existing router via ethernet cable
  2. Connect from it via ethernet to a laptop
  3. Connect to it for Wi-Fi (upstairs)
For info, I have 500Mbps broadband at main router.

Tommy
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 · (Edited)
Tommy, is there a reason you didn't want to go with this access point from Amazon UK? This one is £54.99
What is the brand and model# of your old router?
Thanks Fred.
Old router is one provided by TV company (Hub 3.0, manufactured by Compal VMDG500/CH7465LG-VM)
Main reason was that by the time I add delivery and import fees (Brexit), it comes to €75 ($90, in your money)
If that is the lowest I can get on Amazon, then at least I know where the benchmark is.
Many thanks for all your help.
For completeness, what are the key specifications I should be looking for to buy a suitable Access Point (maybe I can buy second hand)?
Tommy
 

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Team Manager - Networking , Moderator - Micros
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Yikes, that's a lot of markup. Try searching locally for that Netgear - the model is WAC104 and it seemed to fit your needs perfectly.
If you can supply the model # of your old router, I'll look for the specs when I have a chance and see if it's usable as an access point the way others have mentioned.

key Specs you want: Wireless access point with 4 Gigabit LAN ports and 2.4GHz wireless access. For a few dollars more, the access point might also include 5GHz wireless access.

Purchasing something that is a "wireless access point" and not a router features means it will be less expensive than an actual router and you won't have to go disable those router functions to meet your needs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 ·
CH7465
Yikes, that's a lot of markup. Try searching locally for that Netgear - the model is WAC104 and it seemed to fit your needs perfectly.
If you can supply the model # of your old router, I'll look for the specs when I have a chance and see if it's usable as an access point the way others have mentioned.

key Specs you want: Wireless access point with 4 Gigabit LAN ports and 2.4GHz wireless access. For a few dollars more, the access point might also include 5GHz wireless access.

Purchasing something that is a "wireless access point" and not a router features means it will be less expensive than an actual router and you won't have to go disable those router functions to meet your needs.
Thanks Fred.

I edited the last post after you read it to include the existing router model

Tommy
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Tommy, is there a reason you didn't want to go with this access point from Amazon UK? This one is £54.99
What is the brand and model# of your old router?
Sorry Fred,

For this item you have sent a link to, will I be able to connect a laptop via ethernet as well as improving the wi-fi signal? Looking at the rear of it, there does not seem to be an "ethernet-in" and only "ethernet-out", or am I misreading it?

Tommy
 

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Sorry Fred,

For this item you have sent a link to, will I be able to connect a laptop via ethernet as well as improving the wi-fi signal? Looking at the rear of it, there does not seem to be an "ethernet-in" and only "ethernet-out", or am I misreading it?

Tommy
The Netgear is a switch & wireless access point only. You would only need to plug the ethernet cable in your bedroom into any one of the 4 LAN ports on the Netgear. You can plug any other computers, etc into the remaining 3 LAN ports to also give them internet access. There is no IN or Out needed. For wireless access, you would create a new wireless network name in the Netgear's software. That wireless signal would be strongest when you're closest to the Netgear.

Also, it looks like your Compal router may not be very old and you may be able to repurpose it as an access point, so I stand corrected there. I'll check it later.
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
The Netgear is a switch & wireless access point only. You would only need to plug the ethernet cable in your bedroom into any one of the 4 LAN ports on the Netgear. You can plug any other computers, etc into the remaining 3 LAN ports to also give them internet access. There is no IN or Out needed. For wireless access, you would create a new wireless network name in the Netgear's software. That wireless signal would be strongest when you're closest to the Netgear.

Also, it looks like your Compal router may not be very old and you may be able to repurpose it as an access point, so I stand corrected there. I'll check it later.
Thanks Fred.
 

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Tommy, I couldn't find the exact user manual or an access point tutorial for your old Compal router, so I can't walk you through the all the setup pages in your router to make changes. I can give you an outline of the steps needed, but you'd have to find out where to make the changes once you log into your router. Darkhelmet's link in post 16 looks like it covers the basic idea of what's required to convert a router to an AP. You could give it a read and see if it's something you want to try diving into.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
Tommy, I couldn't find the exact user manual or an access point tutorial for your old Compal router, so I can't walk you through the all the setup pages in your router to make changes. I can give you an outline of the steps needed, but you'd have to find out where to make the changes once you log into your router. Darkhelmet's link in post 16 looks like it covers the basic idea of what's required to convert a router to an AP. You could give it a read and see if it's something you want to try diving into.
Thank you for your continued support Fred. Whereas I'm confident enough to follow well written step-by-step instructions, I'm afraid some of this is above my pay grade. I really appreciate all the members' support and that you stuck with it until the end. This forum is brilliant!
It's for my daughter, so I'm going to have a word with her and maybe split the cost of the AP you mentioned earlier. At least we tried, and that's what matters.
Thanks again,
Tommy
 

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I understand and you're welcome, Tommy. You could keep an eye out locally or on ebay for that Netgear model I mentioned. While it still requires a little setup, it should be the easiest of all the options to get up and running.
 
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