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Discussion Starter #1
There´s this old Toshiba Satellite 420CDT (P 100 Mhz, 32 MB RAM, 1 GB HDD), which I was given, the deal is that it has a password protected BIOS and no one has any idea of what the password could be. I´ve searched around and found a way to make a 'KEY' disk with a hex editor, but it didn't work. I hope someone can give me any pointers or ideas about what to do.

Thanks in advance.
 

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ID10T Circuit replacement
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Some older Toshiba's use a backdoor password:
Toshiba

Maybe you could luck out here??:confused:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the quick response idtent

No luck with the "Toshiba" backdoor or the left shift trick :no:

Is there a way to find out what kind of BIOS (AMI, AWARD, etc) does it have, so I can try the default passwords?

I have also read about opening it up and removing the CMOS battery, but it appears to be ineffective in certain models. Not to mention that i'm not really that confident to crack it open :angel:
 

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Toshiba isn't specific, and they may have used more than one bios on the same computer (different productions dates and so forth)

Your best bet is to take it to a computer store. Unless you care nothing about the laptop if something were to happen to it. You could try to take the laptop apart yourself.

From What I found, you more than likely have the "secure" bios and that tool (either you make it, or buy it) is going to be your best bet. (I can't tell you to try or do these things, because there is a risk involved) I am just suggesting options you may have.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
The laptop holds nothing important, it's a spare that no one's used in a long time, I wanted it to run a few linux tests, so I guess I could take it apart without risking my job, however, I'd like to use out all the software options before messing with the hardware.

How does this "secure" tool works?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I've seen several solutions, but they all require a DOS prompt... How can I get to a DOS prompt. I've tried with startup disks, but it won't work, it appears that it's set to boot from HDD first :confused:
 

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The tool is not a software option.

It is a 25 pin connector that is jumpered. You can build the tools off of one of the links I posted, and then plug it into the parallel port of the computer, turn on the computer, then turn off the computer remove the connector and cmos should be reset.

Shouldn't have to take the laptop apart if you make the parallel adapter.
 

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Thanks!, I'll give that loopback adapter a try. If it doesn´t work I'll just have to remove the battery manually. Fingers crossed!

Thanks a lot for all your time and help idtent
 

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Feedback

The parallel port loopback adapter in the link provided by idtent worked great, I built it myself, plugged it in, turned it on, then off after boot up, turned it on again, and the password was gone.

I'm going to keep this useful little thingy around in case this happens again.

Thanks a lot to idtent for his help, hope this thread helps others as well.
 

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I had to do a connector soldering job one time...it didn't work and I figured out that I had soldered it the opposite way it was supposed to be soldered. That was a PC link for my Commodore 64. I never did get it to work
 

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Discussion Starter #13
One of my first experienceswith soldering was making that DB25 adapter to connect the PSX pad to the parallel port of the PC. It was a lot of fun, but I never got the dual shock to work.
 
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