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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Most people use a particular browser. I've played around with several of them.
I use FireFox for Facebook, Chrome for most "business transactions", and Brave for most "Just browsing"
A fellow the other day told me that all the browsers keep the security and password data in the same location, so in reality, that data is vulnerable if anything goes hinky with any one of the Chromium based browsers.

Any thoughts?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I've tended to use the password function of the browsers for the simplicity, and for the sites requiring extra security, using second stage verification through cell phone.
It may be time to take the next step. But that's another discussion, I think.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
One of the common factors I have noticed when reading about security threats is that most of them get into a computer through some sort of method of getting unauthorized access to some other software that a person doesn't want to pay full price for.
The other major factor seems to be related to poor security protocols, like opening attachments in unsolicited emails, or clicking random links in public forums, or apps like Facebook .
But this kind of stuff has been going on since the first computer came online.
Simply put, if you don't let thieves into your house, you have significantly reduced the probability of being robbed.

So, how secure are these password managers? How many people are out there trying to crack them?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
People need to understand that there's no such thing as secure when you're online.

Or at least not the way that most people mean .... ie 100% safe.

If someone has the will, the skills, and the resources needed, then given enough time they can pretty much break into anything.

So given the right motivation, anything that is connected to the Internet can be hacked ....... period.

That does not of course mean that you should not make efforts to make your machine as secure as is reasonably possible, but don't ever go thinking that you're going to make your defences impenetrable because you won't.

What you're securing yourself against, is the vast majority of attackers, who do not have the will, the skills, and the resources to penetrate your defences, because they're the ones you're much, much, much more likely to come into contact with.

It's easy to get paranoid about your security when you read all the various articles that are floating about on the web, but as long as you take reasonable precautions, and browse sensibly, then you'll generally be OK.
Some good points.
It seems to me, that your best defense is obscurity.
The more visible you are, the more likely you are to be a target.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
So, no one here actually has any info on the original question, I guess.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The answer is yes. If your browser is hacked, the saved PWs are vulnerable. PW Managers offer more security.
That was kind of my initial presumption.
And I reckon that most of the browsers using the same engine, it would certainly be easier for the developers to take the easy way, and do the predictable thing.
That would certainly make it easy for hackers.
I for one, would not be temped to depend on any one browser for security, but if all the browser simple feed off the same location on you PC, then they could all be hacked with one swell foop.

I would really like to hear that all these various browsers have something really useful that sets them apart from their competitors.
 
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