Tech Support Forum banner
1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Most people use a particular browser. I've played around with several of them.
I use FireFox for Facebook, Chrome for most "business transactions", and Brave for most "Just browsing"
A fellow the other day told me that all the browsers keep the security and password data in the same location, so in reality, that data is vulnerable if anything goes hinky with any one of the Chromium based browsers.

Any thoughts?
 

·
Team Manager, Microsoft Support
Joined
·
31,454 Posts
Don't worry about that although Brave gives extra protection. If you want to get off the platform entirely, take a look at Vivaldi.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I've tended to use the password function of the browsers for the simplicity, and for the sites requiring extra security, using second stage verification through cell phone.
It may be time to take the next step. But that's another discussion, I think.
 

·
Team Manager, Microsoft Support
Joined
·
31,454 Posts
I've tended to use the password function of the browsers for the simplicity, and for the sites requiring extra security, using second stage verification through cell phone.
It may be time to take the next step. But that's another discussion, I think.
I prefer to answer security questions because I don't want my smart phone out there in any way.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
One of the common factors I have noticed when reading about security threats is that most of them get into a computer through some sort of method of getting unauthorized access to some other software that a person doesn't want to pay full price for.
The other major factor seems to be related to poor security protocols, like opening attachments in unsolicited emails, or clicking random links in public forums, or apps like Facebook .
But this kind of stuff has been going on since the first computer came online.
Simply put, if you don't let thieves into your house, you have significantly reduced the probability of being robbed.

So, how secure are these password managers? How many people are out there trying to crack them?
 

·
Moderator , Security Team
Joined
·
1,997 Posts
People need to understand that there's no such thing as secure when you're online.

Or at least not the way that most people mean .... ie 100% safe.

If someone has the will, the skills, and the resources needed, then given enough time they can pretty much break into anything.

So given the right motivation, anything that is connected to the Internet can be hacked ....... period.

That does not of course mean that you should not make efforts to make your machine as secure as is reasonably possible, but don't ever go thinking that you're going to make your defences impenetrable because you won't.

What you're securing yourself against, is the vast majority of attackers, who do not have the will, the skills, and the resources to penetrate your defences, because they're the ones you're much, much, much more likely to come into contact with.

It's easy to get paranoid about your security when you read all the various articles that are floating about on the web, but as long as you take reasonable precautions, and browse sensibly, then you'll generally be OK.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
People need to understand that there's no such thing as secure when you're online.

Or at least not the way that most people mean .... ie 100% safe.

If someone has the will, the skills, and the resources needed, then given enough time they can pretty much break into anything.

So given the right motivation, anything that is connected to the Internet can be hacked ....... period.

That does not of course mean that you should not make efforts to make your machine as secure as is reasonably possible, but don't ever go thinking that you're going to make your defences impenetrable because you won't.

What you're securing yourself against, is the vast majority of attackers, who do not have the will, the skills, and the resources to penetrate your defences, because they're the ones you're much, much, much more likely to come into contact with.

It's easy to get paranoid about your security when you read all the various articles that are floating about on the web, but as long as you take reasonable precautions, and browse sensibly, then you'll generally be OK.
Some good points.
It seems to me, that your best defense is obscurity.
The more visible you are, the more likely you are to be a target.
 

·
Moderator , Security Team
Joined
·
1,997 Posts
Obscurity is also pretty hard to achieve ..... well, if what you mean by obscurity is privacy, it is anyway.

Too many large organisations, with large budgets, have invested a lot of time and money into ensuring that it's practically impossible for you to remain anonymous online.

But that's another discussion altogether, so I won't elaborate further.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
So, no one here actually has any info on the original question, I guess.
 

·
Team Manager, Microsoft Support
Joined
·
31,454 Posts
The answer is yes. If your browser is hacked, the saved PWs are vulnerable. PW Managers offer more security.
 
  • Like
Reactions: SpywareDr

·
Registered
Joined
·
21 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
The answer is yes. If your browser is hacked, the saved PWs are vulnerable. PW Managers offer more security.
That was kind of my initial presumption.
And I reckon that most of the browsers using the same engine, it would certainly be easier for the developers to take the easy way, and do the predictable thing.
That would certainly make it easy for hackers.
I for one, would not be temped to depend on any one browser for security, but if all the browser simple feed off the same location on you PC, then they could all be hacked with one swell foop.

I would really like to hear that all these various browsers have something really useful that sets them apart from their competitors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
28 Posts
I'm currently using Firefox for general browsing, and Icecat for email and anything where money is involved. I don't store any passwords on the computer, whether in the browser, a password manager or a hidden file with some obscure name. For accounts I don't often use, I write the password down on paper and keep it tucked away.

I agree with Gary R: there's no such thing as secure when online. The more I learn about it the more I realize how insecure everything is. I use bleachbit and occasioanlly change my network's MAC address but after some testing found some places were still tracking me. And it's not just software: the old 4th gen Intel I'm using has a tiny OS hidden inside the CPU that 'phones home' to the mothership. I once looked into air-gapping my setup but decided it was too much.

One way to help prevent your accounts from being hacked is removing all the passwords you have from the computer. I guess everyone has to decide for themselves what security is reasonable to maintain and what isn't.
 

·
Team Manager, Microsoft Support
Joined
·
31,454 Posts
For extra security, I like the sites that make you type the PW from their characters, thereby protecting against keyloggers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
Research a good reputable password manager. The one I use encrypts the database file by default, as it should. It also allows me to keep the database file on a flash drive. This way when I am away from my PC I can eject the flash drive.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
18 Posts
I know that the most used browsers (Chrome, Firefox...) will store passwords locally on your computer if you save them. They are stored in hidden AppData folders, and this database is not encrypted at all. So, if someone gets admin access to your computer, they have all the stored passwords in clear view. This is VERY dangerous practice no matter the browser.

I agree with Gary R too, anything can be hacked just like any building or physical security can be accessible if you use enough ressources and/or force.
 

·
Global Moderator
Electronic Design
Joined
·
52,033 Posts
One has to temper all of this security with reality as well.

I use a password manager, but I don't go to the trouble of a removable drive with passwords that I carry around. I use LastPass, and I don't have browsers store passwords. Anyone gaining access to my system first has to actually login, and then guess a complex password to my LastPass application. Given that the system is in my house, that provides another barrier, very rarely are we all out, and then there's that pesky central station alarm system to contend with.
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top