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How do i bond 2 dsl lines?

Can i bond 1 dsl and 1 cable line together?

Will this actually double my download and upload speeds?

I saw two hardwares that can do that.
one was by xincom, and the other by Hawkins.

IS there a wireless router that can bond both of these. i need help soon.

I have DSL right now (3mbits down/512k up)
 

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If you are paying for cable and DSL, why not look into purchasing one business line that would increase your connection throughput, or even ask your ISP if they can increase your line speed (for a price of course).
 

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fiber optics have not been installed in the area, so right now they dont have that.

plus for 3mb down and 512k up, im only paying $25 a month. so if i get 2 dsl lines it would be $50 a month.
 

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I believe you may have to contact your ISP to see what they say about multilink PPP connections. They may not support doing this and it could be against their policy to try it.
 

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If you're paying for two DSL accounts, I can't imagine why you can't connect them to a dual-WAN router, I have several customers that do that. They usually have DSL and cable for redundancy in case one service is down.

Keep in mind if you connect a dual-WAN router, a single threaded download will only use one of the channels. However, the bandwidth of the other channel will be available for other purposes. Multi-threaded downloads could use both channels.

The wireless is easy, just connect a WAP to one of the LAN ports on the dual-WAN router. If you want to save money, use a cheap wireless router connected like this:

Connecting two SOHO broadband routers together.

Configure the IP address of the secondary router to be in the same subnet as the primary router, but out of the range of the DHCP server in the primary router. For instance DHCP server addresses 192.168.0.2 through 192.168.0.100, I'd assign the secondary router 192.168.0.254 as it's IP address.

Disable the DHCP server in the secondary router.

Setup the wireless section just the way you would if it was the primary router.

Connect from the primary router's LAN port to one of the LAN ports on the secondary router. If there is no uplink port and neither of the routers have auto-sensing ports, use a cross-over cable. Leave the WAN port unconnected!
 
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