Tech Support banner

Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 10 of 10 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi, folks.

I´m trying to set up a wireless network on my office, and I need some advices. I will share probably an ADSL broadband connection, with a max of 10 machines (some laptops included), 2 scanners and 3 printers, in a 20 square meters room.

Does Bluetooth apply to this? Or a 802.11g is enough? What questions shoud I consider at first? I´m a newbie on this stuff, so I will be very pleased if someone could give me some clues.

Thanks a lot,
and cheers from Brazil.

M0C0R0H
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,154 Posts
im not a wireless network expert since ive mostly worked with wired networks but ill provide some inputs.

when it comes to purchasing computer stuff check out good reputable stores such as www.newegg.com www.zipzoomfly.com and even www.mwave.com

i recommend linksys products because ive had really good experience with them but there are other good brands too such as netgear and dlink. are all computers gonna be wireless? if not, then you can purchase a linksys wireless router, 8port linksys switch, and even print servers since you are also hooking up and networking multiple printers.

802.11g will be good enough for you and remember to encrypt your network with WPA settings. good luck and feel free to post back if you have more questions or run into problems when you are encypting your network. good luck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
keymaker said:
when it comes to purchasing computer stuff check out good reputable stores such as www.newegg.com www.zipzoomfly.com and even www.mwave.com
I´ve been searching through www.tigerdirect.com and www.ecost.com, particularly for the low prices. But as a brazilian customer, I need some confidence and reputable references for safe shipping. So I will have a look at those you recommended. Thanks.

keymaker said:
i recommend linksys products because ive had really good experience with them but there are other good brands too such as netgear and dlink. are all computers gonna be wireless? if not, then you can purchase a linksys wireless router, 8port linksys switch, and even print servers since you are also hooking up and networking multiple printers.
Probably all the machines will be wireless. I´ve seen a Wireless Router 108Mbps 802.11g, from D-Link, and a similar, from US Robotics. Both with a 4 port switch and USB print server, all I need.

keymaker said:
802.11g will be good enough for you and remember to encrypt your network with WPA settings. good luck and feel free to post back if you have more questions or run into problems when you are encypting your network. good luck
Those D-Link hardwares come with some security resources, as I´ve read in the specifications. Do you suggest any other 3rd party security software else?

Thank you very much for the attention.

M0C0R0H
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,154 Posts
hi again mocoroh,

hmmmmm........the hardware firewalls on the routers are pretty good but if you want a good software firewall, then zonealarms is really good. also ive heard good news about kerio firewall but ive never worked with it so i cant say if its good or not. you can download many programs such as spyware utilities, firewall, and more from www.majorgeeks.com

check out AVG anti-virus for your virus protection. its a really good anti-virus program.

Capoiera is awesome!!!!!

keymaker
 

·
Citizen of the world
Joined
·
51,042 Posts
I STRONGLY recommend you consider a wired network for your use. When you get that many 802.11g machines on one connection, the performance will really suffer. You are making a serious error trying to do that many wireless machines IMO. It doesn't sound like the wiring would be that prohibitive, and I'll guarantee you that it'll be a lot more problem-free, and vastly better performance. Oh, did I mention it would be significantly cheaper?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
johnwill said:
When you get that many 802.11g machines on one connection, the performance will really suffer. You are making a serious error trying to do that many wireless machines IMO.
Do you know any site where I could find some comparative graphs (between 802 and wired) or something like it? And how could it be an ideal wireless network, in your opinion (max n° of machines, environment, etcetera)? (and, sorry, what do you mean with IMO?)
johnwill said:
Oh, did I mention it would be significantly cheaper?
In fact, wireless apparatus is much more expensive than wired stuff, here in Brazil. But we (my office) got an oportunity of importing some equipment from U.S. with low taxes, so imported 802 equipment will be cheaper than local wired eq. with installation.

Thank you for the help and attention,

MOCOROH
 

·
Citizen of the world
Joined
·
51,042 Posts
IMO - In My Opinion

I don't know of any specific graphs, but consider this. An 802.11g 54mbit channel gets a real throughput in the high 20's under ideal circumstances. The connections are half-duplex, so any protocol that has handshaking has an additional overhead. If you connect multiple wireless devices to a single access point, they all share that bandwidth, and they will SIGNIFICANTLY reduce the total bandwidth available. In other words, two 802.11g devices will have less than 1/2 the available bandwidth of a single device using the connection. By the time you connect 4-5 machines to the same wireless access point or router, it's really snail slow. Don't even think about sharing files in such a situation, it will be REALLY PAINFUL! Interference with other devices or networks will further complicate the picture.

Using dirt cheap 10/100mhz wired connections, the connections between each machine and any other will be a real 100mbit full-duplex connection.

Even if the wireless solution is cheaper, I can assure you that living with it long term will eat up any savings. Of course, the wired solution will be rock solid, more secure, and MUCH faster. :smile:

Obviously, if you want to have wireless access for occasional use by a couple of laptops, that's a different situation, but I'd wire the machines that are in steady use. I connect my laptop with a cable when moving stuff to/from it in my shop, I only use the wireless when I want to walk around with it.

Wireless is not really suitable for a situation such as yours, I'll try for the last time to get you to rethink the solution.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,290 Posts
Well stated JW.

My first choice is to always hardwire a network when possible. Even more so on a network I support!!!

I always market/offer wireless as an occasional use convenience, not a permanent solution.

I know too many folks that have had issues with wireless, never been total happy with the invisible gremlins that cause the network to malfunction.

My wife got annoyed with me the other day with her work laptop when she had to do something right when she walked in the door from work. She was on the phone and had to connect up to a wired drop to get the machine to work. After she finished busting my chops, I politely reminded her she was talking on the 2.4 GHz cordless phone while she was on the laptop and that maybe the phone had something to do with her wireless connection not working. As usual, I was to blame for a sub standard network. Unfortunately my sales attempt to upgrade our cordless phones to 5 GHz was shot down very quickly as well.

But I thought it WAS worth a try!!

Some customers are just never happy!! :grin:

JamesO
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5 Posts
Discussion Starter #9
Hey, JW.

no doubt anymore. very convincible. got wired! :sayyes:

Thanks a lot for your attention,

MOCOROH
 
1 - 10 of 10 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top