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Discussion Starter #1
Hi, my old HDD is dieing and I want to back up a few things from it to my new HDD, but when I put in my new HDD my computer doesn't recognize it.


Just to make this clear I have 3 storage devices. First one is my SSD which has my OS on it, next I have my old HDD (dieing) which is the one with my files, and than my new HDD is the one that I got from my warranty on my old HDD.


All I need is to put my old files from my old to the new but when I plug my new HDD it doesn't show in My Computer. Do I need to do something after I plug it in? Thx
 

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New internal hard drives are usually supplied unpartitioned and therefore unformatted. That means it has no drive-letter, which in turn means Windows Explorer can't see it.

So what to do? Well, fortunately Windows includes a utility called Disk Management, and that can see a drive which has no drive letter. Go here for full instructions: How To Partition a Hard Drive in Windows 7
 

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New internal hard drives are usually supplied unpartitioned and therefore unformatted. That means it has no drive-letter, which in turn means Windows Explorer can't see it.

So what to do? Well, fortunately Windows includes a utility called Disk Management, and that can see a drive which has no drive letter. Go here for full instructions: How To Partition a Hard Drive in Windows 7
Sounds like the fix I need, ill give it a shot. thx sir
 

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New internal hard drives are usually supplied unpartitioned and therefore unformatted. That means it has no drive-letter, which in turn means Windows Explorer can't see it.

So what to do? Well, fortunately Windows includes a utility called Disk Management, and that can see a drive which has no drive letter. Go here for full instructions: How To Partition a Hard Drive in Windows 7
Just wanted to ask one more thing can I back up all my files say video card drivers, programs, installed games for example to me new HDD? Would be great to know to make sure I don't mess up and back up things that can't be backed up. Thx again.
 

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Video card drivers: Yes
Programs: Not always. Some applications don't save their settings and information in the programs folder and some do.
Games for instance: World of Warcraft you can do this with so as to avoid needing to download the game again and it doesn't need to be reinstalled in order to work. You just create a shortcut on your desktop to the WoW executable and away you go but this is not always the case. Some games make changes to the system's registry and other various system files that the game is dependent on in order to work correctly but in your case all these changes are already made in the SSD drive where your OS resides.

If you are simply copying your old drive to a new drive and then removing the old drive and replacing it with the new drive I would simply open up the drive, select everything and copy it to the new drive. Mean while do not make any changes to any files on the system. Once the copy is complete shut down your machine, remove the old drive and place in the new drive. When the system comes up be sure that your new drive received the same drive letter as your old drive and you should be good to go. If not open disc management and right click the drive and change the drive letter to the letter it should be.

Hope this wasn't to much info. Guess I feel talkative tonight.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Video card drivers: Yes
Programs: Not always. Some applications don't save their settings and information in the programs folder and some do.
Games for instance: World of Warcraft you can do this with so as to avoid needing to download the game again and it doesn't need to be reinstalled in order to work. You just create a shortcut on your desktop to the WoW executable and away you go but this is not always the case. Some games make changes to the system's registry and other various system files that the game is dependent on in order to work correctly but in your case all these changes are already made in the SSD drive where your OS resides.

If you are simply copying your old drive to a new drive and then removing the old drive and replacing it with the new drive I would simply open up the drive, select everything and copy it to the new drive. Mean while do not make any changes to any files on the system. Once the copy is complete shut down your machine, remove the old drive and place in the new drive. When the system comes up be sure that your new drive received the same drive letter as your old drive and you should be good to go. If not open disc management and right click the drive and change the drive letter to the letter it should be.

Hope this wasn't to much info. Guess I feel talkative tonight.
is changing the drive letter that important? because I just set it to F: yesterday when I partitioned it. I heard it might be annoying to change the drive letter to something else so I don't know if its that important to do it. Also my old drive letter is E:
 

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Yes if you have applications installed to that drive as the OS on the primary drive will look to the same drive letter for the same applications.

Now when you have completed your copy, removed the old drive and installed the new one the drive should automatically take the drive letter of the old drive as it would then be the first available drive letter.

Also changing drive letters is not to big of a deal. It is easily done in computer management in the disc manager.
 

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Yes if you have applications installed to that drive as the OS on the primary drive will look to the same drive letter for the same applications.

Now when you have completed your copy, removed the old drive and installed the new one the drive should automatically take the drive letter of the old drive as it would then be the first available drive letter.

Also changing drive letters is not to big of a deal. It is easily done in computer management in the disc manager.
So I should back up all my files first to my new HDD than take out my old HDD and change the drive letter? Also I wanna wipe all my files in my old HDD after I back it up first. What would be the best way to wipe out all my data on my old HDD? thx
 

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Do a complete copy of the data from the old to the new. Shutdown the machine. Mount the new drive in place of the old drive. Turn machine back on and confirm everything works as it should. Do not modify the old drive until you have confirmed the new drive is working as it should.
Once you have confirmed that then shut down and plug in the old drive but don't mount it in the case as there is no need to. Wipe the old disc with [email protected] Kill disc free.
Job done.
If once you have installed the new HD it doesn't pull the drive letter you want then change it.
 

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Do a complete copy of the data from the old to the new. Shutdown the machine. Mount the new drive in place of the old drive. Turn machine back on and confirm everything works as it should. Do not modify the old drive until you have confirmed the new drive is working as it should.
Once you have confirmed that then shut down and plug in the old drive but don't mount it in the case as there is no need to. Wipe the old disc with [email protected] Kill disc free.
Job done.
If once you have installed the new HD it doesn't pull the drive letter you want then change it.
I just got a BSOD when I tried to copy my files from my old HDD to my new HDD. But when I got back on the computer it copied most of my stuff in the new HDD from the old HDD so I guess its ok I hope. I barley got to see what the BSOD error was but i think it said kernal_something_something. Hope it isn't anything bad.
 

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Also do I really need to wipe my old HDD? because I have to send it back to seagate really soon or ill get a fine because they sent me a new HDD first instead of me sending my old HDD first and I need to send my old HDD to them within 20 days or ill have to pay them 100$ and I'm sure they'll wipe it themselves and it really doesn't have that much important data. just a question really late here sry for the confusion. thx
 

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No you do not need to wipe the old drive. It is completely up to you.
Do you have another machine you can do a copy with or can you barrow a friend's machine?
You may need to also run a disk check on that hard drive. You may have BSOD'd because of bad sectors.
In "Computer" right click the hard drive you are copying from, click tools and then "Scan Now" then hit start. It may prompt you that this will need to be done at the next reboot and if you want to. Click yes and/or schedule then reboot.
 

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No you do not need to wipe the old drive. It is completely up to you.
Do you have another machine you can do a copy with or can you barrow a friend's machine?
You may need to also run a disk check on that hard drive. You may have BSOD'd because of bad sectors.
In "Computer" right click the hard drive you are copying from, click tools and then "Scan Now" then hit start. It may prompt you that this will need to be done at the next reboot and if you want to. Click yes and/or schedule then reboot.
Well so far everythings perfectly fine with my computer except for some disk errors in eventviewer/window logs/system course I was told that isn't a big deal. Also couldn't I just run HDtune it seems to pick up bad sectors really easly without having to do all that you said just a idea.

What I think is I got BSOD because of my old HDD because I had a game installed on it that was giving me a lot of problems. So I had to manually uninstall it by deleting everything from it. That's about it for the problems I have and had really.
 

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You could use HDTune but it would be best to use the manufactures tools to run a full smart test. This will tell the hard drive to run a full surface test in the background and will try to repair any issues with the drive.
However since you plan to send the drive back to the manufacturer then I wouldn't bother with any further tests. Just send the drive back and they'll take care of it when it comes in.

If you manually removed the files from your old game I would recommend downloading and installing CCleaner. Use the registry cleaner to clean out all your invalid registry entries as you will have quite a few now that files are missing.
 
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