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Hi i recently built my first computer and it worked for a whole week :)
Asus p4p800 deluxe
Corsair Twinx 1gb ram
Pentium 4 2.8 ghz
ATI 9600 Pro
Western Digital 80 gb special edition
Austin Power Supply(the problem??)

After one week of very stable performance, during a game of Warcraft III, the computer suddenly shut down. Trying to restart the computer resulted in it powering up for a few seconds before shutting down at various points such as the asus p4p800 screen and the checking for the connected devices screen. Eventually it got into windows xp but now it won't work again... After trying to use the cd drive it mysteriously shut down. I felt the power supply and it seemed to be pretty hot. Since it's not a name brand I think this might be the problem but i'd like some help :). Now its just going to the checking for devices screen before shutting down. Thanks for any help you can give :)
 

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Hi I actually got to the BIOS today only to discover the CPU temperature was running at 99 degrees celcius... very disturbing... Any ideas on how i can fix this?
 

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You're probably right that a thermal shutdown is what you experienced. If the 99C is accurate, it's pretty obvious there is something wrong with the way your heatsink is mounted to the CPU. Even a stock heatsink should be able to dissipate heat better than that. Maybe they forgot the thermal transfer grease/ tape in between, or did a poor job of applying it. Or maybe the fan isn't turning, or turning enough. If the CPU fan has a speed control, turn it up. You're not purposely overclocking, are you?

Or consider a beefier heatsink-- I've got the same CPU on my P4C800-E but I run a Zalman CNPS7000-Cu heavy copper heatsink, which keeps it cool. With any 3rd party heatsink there is always the risk of problems with fit, so try to judge that first. I mounted it to the CPU with Artic Silver 3 Premium thermal compound which came in a syringe. If you go this route, pull out 2 grains of real rice and set them on the bench as a guide for you when you're measuring out how much compound to put on the CPU's lid. The Arctic 3 website has very highly detailed step-by-step instructions for a successful application of thermal compound.

If even the supply is hot, you'd better also make sure there is enough airflow through your box. The air exiting the supply should feel warm, but not hot. Reroute some cables, especially the flat ones, to let the air flow more freely within. And make sure air can get into and away from all the fan openings around the outside of the box. Make sure some fans are blowing out, and you may need a fan blowing in, too.

You indicated you thought your Austin supply might be the problem. This appears to be a generic brand. I found some Austin supplies in Axion cases, but the highest I saw was 400 watts. It could be that your supply is straining to meet the load. Your mobo requires an ATX12V-rated supply, I think this is a spec which means not only higher ratings overall, but it also adds an extra 4-pin power cable that runs +12 Volts on two lines which go pretty much straight to the CPU; if your Austin lacks this, that could be a problem. Most folks having the best luck with mobo's in your series are running 480 watt supplies. I don't know why they feel they need so much, but P4 does suck the juice. I run an Antec True480 and it's fine except for fan noise.

Hope this helps,

-clintfan
 

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Thanks :) I think i'm just gonna return the cpu and get a new one... One problem is that the retail boxed processor didn't come with thermal paste. I believe though that it's already on the heatsink. Thanks again :)
 

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Well make sure the replacement uses some sort of approved paste, compound, grease, sticky tape, or whatever. You absolutely gotta have that! Otherwise hardly any heat will transfer to the sink, and your CPU will quickly cook. I've read a P4 can cook in as little as 10 seconds.

-clintfan
 
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I've read a P4 can cook in as little as 10 seconds
You can take the heatsink off of a P4 and it won't cook. It will slow down or shutdown but cook it won't!

Now an AMD, well that's another story there................
:rolleyes:
 
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