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I'm on an Asus model "TUF Gaming FX705DY_FX705DY" running on Windows 10

A couple weeks ago I started getting a notice every time I started my computer that errors were detected on my HDD which, if I remember correctly was 2tb, and it was repairig them. Then a week ago I was transferring some files from it and it said four of them weren't detected. I changed the order of files and they transferred no problem.

Then a couple days ago the laptop started making buzzing noises. At first I didn't even realize it was the laptop making the noise, to be honest. The HDD was being used mostly for programs, steam games and downloaded files before being transferred to an external. On the 23rd I went to play something on steam and discovered all my installed games were no longer installed. The HDD was no longer being detecte at all. Restarted a few times, tried chkdsk, nothing worked. The system's still making those buzzing noises, if anything they're getting louder. I assume this either means my SDD will fail before long as well, or the D drive is trying and failing to work.

No idea if it makes any difference, but I have three external hard drives I generally keep connected to the laptop's USB ports The SDD and externals are all operating fine.

What if anything can I do? Are the files on it just lost no matter what? Any chance I can get it detected and working again? Is it possible it somehow shook loose or something?
 

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First off, we need a couple of basic pieces of information. Is the drive an old mechanical style drive or is it some sort of flash technology like either NSSD or an NVME M.2? Next we need to know how old is the laptop and also did you happen to have any sort of power issues at the time that you started first detecting some symptoms with buzzing? With the fact that there is buzzing, and that the hard drive is not being detected, there are only two possibilities of what it could be. If you had a power issue at the time, the buzzing started then it could be the motherboard and or the CPU took some sort of a jolt, if it didn’t have any kind of a power issue at that time, it could wind up being the drive. Please let us know further, and will see what else we can detect. What you can try is if you are adept at working on a computer physically mechanically with tools, you may try to remove the drive and plug it in as a secondary drive into another computer to see if the drive is detected on another computer . If you have an extra internal hard drive of the same type, sitting around somewhere, you can try swapping it in to the laptop and test if it detects the drive if they were problems and it does not detect a different drive then it means your motherboard is kaput.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
First off, we need a couple of basic pieces of information. Is the drive an old mechanical style drive or is it some sort of flash technology like either NSSD or an NVME M.2? Next we need to know how old is the laptop and also did you happen to have any sort of power issues at the time that you started first detecting some symptoms with buzzing? With the fact that there is buzzing, and that the hard drive is not being detected, there are only two possibilities of what it could be. If you had a power issue at the time, the buzzing started then it could be the motherboard and or the CPU took some sort of a jolt, if it didn’t have any kind of a power issue at that time, it could wind up being the drive. Please let us know further, and will see what else we can detect. What you can try is if you are adept at working on a computer physically mechanically with tools, you may try to remove the drive and plug it in as a secondary drive into another computer to see if the drive is detected on another computer . If you have an extra internal hard drive of the same type, sitting around somewhere, you can try swapping it in to the laptop and test if it detects the drive if they were problems and it does not detect a different drive then it means your motherboard is kaput.
There are occasional, brief powerouts here. Every so often I have to go reset the the circuit breaker, or the power will just shut off for a few seconds then go right back on. I can't remember for certain though as that occurs pretty routinely. I don't know if it makes any difference but it's plugged in through a surge protector. I do remember a few days ago the cord connected to my phone -which is plugged into the same surge protector- kept causing my phone to make the noise for being plugged in over and over and over, so I had to unplug it and swap cords.

I've never taken this system apart at all, I don't even think I have the right tools for it currently so I'd have to order some. I have other externals, but none I could easily take out of their case. If I did go that route would there be any risk it could damage the other drive somehow? Is there any chance it could be as simple as something inside having been shaken loose or something?

As far as I recall, the drive is just a standard HDD, paired with a SDD. The SDD is still operating without issue. I want to say I bought this September 2020.
 

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A "buzzing" from a mechanical hard disk drive generally means that the stepper motor is either frantically moving the read-write heads all over the place as the drive controller looks for data that it can't find or the drive has suffered a head crash and the motor is just "spinning its wheels," so to speak, trying to get the stuck heads to move. Either way, your HDD is probably toast. The time to transfer information off of the drive was when it first started showing errors. I'd try finding a larger SSD and just going with it rather than trying to recreate the hybrid system. Spinning hard drives and mobile computers never really did go together well.
 

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Here is a video showing how to open the laptop. You don't need special tools, just a Phillips head screw driver.


Once your replace the drive with an SSD and install Windows, you can attach the old drive to the computer via a USB Adapter. If the old drive still starts up and you can access it, you can copy any of the files from the old drives User folder to the new computer.
 
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