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Lacoka Nostra
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Discussion Starter #1
I have a Asus A7V333 motherboard, and i have a technics (SA-EX140) Receiver plugged into the onboard sound card. With a RCA cable, when i play music, movies, games, it sounds realy bad.
The bass is up realy loud & it distorts. How can i fix this problem?
 

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...Receiver plugged into the onboard sound card...
Right. Tell us what jack (meaning what their labels say) is plugged into what jack, on both ends. That may give us some clues. (Sorry if this sounds elementary, I just don't know your level of experience on audio connections.)

-clintfan
 

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Lacoka Nostra
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Discussion Starter #4
Line-in i believe, i know its not my drivers or my Grado SR-80 headphones. I tried every jack & it sounds the same!
 

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...Receiver plugged into the onboard sound card...
...Line-in i believe...
Sorry, just not enough information to go on. Please tell us what jack (meaning what their labels say) is plugged into what jack, on both ends.

Why exactly are you trying to use your receiver with your computer?

-clintfan
 

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Lacoka Nostra
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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
It doe's not say, there is pictures thou, the first jack shows sound waves going out. And the second one shows the sound waves going in. And the jack is a slipt RCA cable, meaning the white & red ends are connected too, a one-way connector. And the RCA plug is connected back of my recevier that says phono
 

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Lacoka Nostra
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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
Im sorry its not a one-way connector its called a Y-cables or Y-adapter. This is connected to RCA cables that are connected to my recevier
in the back where it says phono......
 

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This is connected to RCA cables that are connected to my recevier in the back where it says phono......
Thanks for the info. Not quite the right sort of Y-cable picture, but I think I see your problem. You cannot connect your computer's sound output jack to the receiver's Phono In jacks the way you have it. Your computer outputs what we call "line level" signals, and it must be attached to a line-level input jack. Phono inputs only accept very low level signals, the sort a little tiny phono cartridge can produce. With anything higher, like a computer or CD player, you will overload it: it will be too loud and will distort --as you observed-- and you could even blow out an IC in the receiver.


Now I apologize for the rest of this. I just cannot tell your level of expertise on this stuff. Here goes...

I checked the manual for your receiver. It has Phono, CD, Tape Rec (Out), Tape Play (In), VCR Out, and VCR In. I don't know which of these other external devices you have attached to this unit. And I cannot find a manual detail or clear-enough photo that lists the 5 input selector switches on the front panel. But assuming they are CD, Tuner, Tape Monitor, Phono, and VCR, let me make some recommendations for you. You can choose whichever one works best for your equipment setup:
  1. Plug your computer red&white RCA plugs into the receiver CD jacks. Press the CD input selector (or "CD" on the remote). Or...
  2. Plug your computer red&white RCA plugs into the receiver VCR In jacks. Press the VCR input selector (or "VCR" on the remote). Or...
  3. Plug your computer red&white RCA plugs into the receiver Tape Play (In) jacks. Press the Taape Monitor input selector (or "Tape Monitor" on the remote). [/list=1]

    Now run the computer sound. You should hear it fine through the receiver after you adjust the volumes.

    If phono is the only input you have left, then you will have to find some attenuator cables designed for line-to-phono application. I do not know where to find such beasts, you might have to build them yourself using some resistor dividers, I'm not sure of the exact values or design. But even with such a cable, I think you might be unhappy with the resulting sound, because phono inputs' frequency response is designed for an RIAA equalization curve, to deal with what phonograph cartridges produce from records. It is not the same sort of flat response curve as you would get from a CD or other line-level device.

    Hope this helps,

    -clintfan
 

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Lacoka Nostra
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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Thanks man........I got it, i need to get a better recevier like a onkyo or a krell amplifier. Because mine sounds like crap, its all colored & speakers (Drivers) don't image. Im glad i have my grado headphones....
 
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