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Discussion Starter #1
On my PC Health Status (BIOS):

Vcore _____ 1.50
3.3 V _____ 3.31
+ 5 V _____ 4.94
+ 12 V ____ 11.61
- 12 V ____ -11.62
- 5 V _____ -4.89
VBAT(V) ___ 3.23
5VSB(V) ___ 5.21


Does all this look right for an aging PSU? It isn't ancient or anything, but it is getting older. It is a SPI (Sparkle Power Inc. I believe) PSU.

It is a 300W and has very high ratings online for reliability. I haven't had problems with it yet. I am just curious if these would still be considered acceptable readings in the bios.

Oh one more thing, just a side question I thought up. There are some PSU watt requirement testers online, I am wondering if they are at least accurate enough to go by for judging if your PSU is adequate for your video card. That is, assuming you have filled out the info in the calculator properly before hitting "calculate".

This is the particular calculator I am using. http://www.journeysystems.com/?power_supply_calculator
 

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Try this calculater

http://www.extreme.outervision.com/psucalculatorlite.jsp

Your readings are OK, not great on the +12V, 11.6 is above spec but barely. If your system is older and no upgrading is planned you should be ok because sparle does make very good supplies
Thank you very much for the quick reply and the info, it is helpful to me. :)

I don't really plan on "upgrading" if I can really call it that. I have ran a few cards on this supply before, one that came with the PC which was a low requirement on the PSU, then one which to my recollection was quite a bit higher (400w requirement maybe?). The last one failed, and I thought it was because of the PSU. But to my surprise it wasn't, it was just because the card had become slightly loose due to heating/cooling over time (I had no screw holding it down, and the bracket I used was worn). But the card I have sitting here now, I want to put in is a 350W recommended. But according to the calculator, on a full peak system load, it only uses about 295ish watts (everything else in the case included, of course).

The 295 watt reading is from the calculator you linked me to, and I took into consideration the capacitor aging and added the 20%. I also set it to 100% peak and the CPU Utilization to 100%. So, effectively I would imagine this is the absolute maximum the system will be taxed for watts, correct?

One last note, I also calculated with the recommended 90% load, and recommended CPU utilization 85% and the required watts for the PSU are 258.

Does this look safe overall?

Sorry, this has turned into a longer ordeal than I had thought. Thanks again for the info you supplied me with in that quick reply.
 

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You used the calculator correctly by adding for cap aging andcpu utilzation, good job because its always good to go high to allow for head room.

You will be safe overall but I would keep a eye on that 12V, install the card go into bios and have a look at the +12V if it drops any more you could start to experance problems, if not enter windows, istall the drivers after removing the old ones and have a go at a game or two
 

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You used the calculator correctly by adding for cap aging andcpu utilzation, good job because its always good to go high to allow for head room.

You will be safe overall but I would keep a eye on that 12V, install the card go into bios and have a look at the +12V if it drops any more you could start to experance problems, if not enter windows, istall the drivers after removing the old ones and have a go at a game or two
Great, thanks again for the info. You have been a great help!
 
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