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Discussion Starter #1
I am trying to transfer files/folders between a Win 10 computer and a Linux Mint 20 computer, using the FOSS app.Nitroshare. I find that transfer, in either direction functions ONLY when the Public Network Firewall in Windows Defender is set OFF, even after I have enabled Nitroshare as an 'Allowed Application' within Defender. I regard this as dangerous. Further more I do not understand why the setting of the Private Network Firewall n Defender has no affect on the ability to transfer. Everything I read about Nitroshare suggests it runs on my Home, private network, not on a Public Network.

How can I enable file transfer via Nitroshare with the Public Network Firewall ON, on my Windows computer?
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
The answer to the 'why ?' is simple and self-evident from a trial use of Nitroshare: it is much quicker to set-up and easier to use than the methods described in the link, using the 'built-in tools'. That link describes 4 methods:

The first (use a USB drive) is just simply decades out of date and achingly slow for a single file transfer..

The next method (SSH) requires more 3rd party tools (which are not 'built-in') than using Nitroshare and, in my experience, is quite difficult to get working, throwing up numerous security issues between Linux and Windows.

The next method (using SAMBA) is a beast to set up and get working, with very little support available, other than a SAMBA guide, written by a high skilled professional (aka SWERDNA) about 12 years ago, for use by a similarly highly skilled professional, beyond my skill level. I tried for more than 8 years to set-up and use SAMBA and gave up long ago. The linked article paints a very rosy picture which works well in the author's environment - which is not my environment - and gives no clues as to how much work was required behind the scenes. Presumably the author is considerably more technically competent than I or he wouldn't have published the article. Even if one can get it to work, it is necessary to copy/move the files to be transferred into/out of the shared directory in Linux. That is more work, more complicated complicated and more error prone than using Nitroshare.

The final method (using Windows Shared Folder) is also somewhat complicated to set-up. It has NEVER worked on any pairing between the Linux and Windows computers on my network and has the same usability disadvantage of using a single shared folder (in Windows this time, rather then in Linux). In particular Widows NEVER remembers the password, in my experience.

Just out of interest, I couldn't figure out how any of the methods referred to in the linked article answered my question on how to enable file transfer via Nitroshare when the Public Network Firewall is enabled in Windows Defender. What have I not understood about your answer?

Append: Just to confirm: the procedure described for the last option does NOT work in my environment: the options in Windows 10 are not as described; the Linux environment is very different between Ubuntu and Mint, making the procedure as described inapplicable. But in trying this I did finally learn why my Windows system insists that I am on a Public network here in my home. A very daft design, in my view .
 

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Just out of interest, I couldn't figure out how any of the methods referred to in the linked article answered my question on how to enable file transfer via Nitroshare when the Public Network Firewall is enabled in Windows Defender.
They don't answer your question directly, but they do give you a way to transfer files from Linux to Windows without having to turn off the firewall in Defender.

I've used the method I recommended without any real problems and thought it might be a solution you could use. Obviously from your reply it is not.

Don't have any personal experience with Nitroshare, so I'm afraid I can't help you directly with that. Hopefully someone else will be able to help you resolve things to your satisfaction.
 

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I know this doesn't answer your question and its only a suggestion, but what about TeamViewer or a similar remote desktop app and use it to transfer files between the two? I've never tried it myself and don't know if it would work but it seems it might.
 

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Hello,
For this, you can use a different third party solution, but keep in mind there is also many application which is free. First, try to use the free software then, move to paid one if you want more specifications. And also choose the best one which suits you
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you, Mr. Moderator TSF, for such a succinct, relevant and highly effective answer. It was what I learned when trying to understand previous alternatives. I had no idea, previously, that there were network 'types' or that it is possible to switch between them.Further more, Win 10 gives no explicit indication - as far as I can see - of which type is currently enabled. I asume that 'Public' is the Win 10 (daft) default, as I had never (knowingly) set it to any type. I also now understand that there are less restrictions on network traffic in the 'Private' mode, or, to put it another way, even though 'Public' mode enables one to define 'allowed applications', traffic from those applications is allowed ONLY when the Firewall of Public mode is OFF - and that is supremely daft.

Anyway, for other readers trying to get Nitroshare to work, switch the Network type, as forum Moderator Stancestans says, to 'Private' and this simple, REALLY quick, application works immediately between Win 10 and Linux.
 
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Discussion Starter #10
For this, you can use a different third party solution, but keep in mind there is also many application which is free. First, try to use the free software then, move to paid one if you want more specifications. And also choose the best one which suits you
You are aware that Nitroshare isa FOSS application, aren't you? And it works very nicely against my requirements, to the point where I cannot see the justification for other, significantly more complicated solutions.
 

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I asume that 'Public' is the Win 10 (daft) default,
It's not, Private is the default. I've had mine, on various computers, randomly switch to Public for whatever reason which is as you say, (daft).
 

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You normally make this decision the first time you connect to a network. Windows will ask whether you want your PC to be discoverable on that network. if you select Yes, Windows sets the network as Private. If you select No, Windows sets the network as public. You can see whether a network is private or public from the Network and Sharing Center window in the Control Panel.
you can click the link right below the network’s name here and set the network to either “Home Network,” “Work Network,” or “Public Network.” A Home network is a Private network, while a Work network is like a Private network where discovery is enabled but Homegroup sharing isn’t.
To switch a network to public or private on Windows 10, you’ll need to use the Settings app.

If you’re using a Wi-Fi connection, first connect to the Wi-Fi network you want to change. Launch the Settings app, select “Network & Internet,” select “Wi-Fi,” scroll down, and click “Advanced options.”

If you’re using a wired Ethernet connection, connect to that network. Launch the Settings app, select “Network & Internet,” select “Ethernet,” and click the name of your Ethernet connection.

Hope this helps you understand.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Hope this helps you understand.
Yes it does, thank you.
I just wish that this information had been made available to me by Mircosoft, just as succunctly and clearly stated, when I migrated my windows computers to Win 10. I have been struggling ever since trying to understand why I could transfer files between some installations, bot not others, when the configurations appeared to be identical (but actually weren't in details that are not explicitly shown - and which you only find if you know what to look for and where, in which case you probably already know them!. Daft, and dafter.)
 

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Discussion Starter #14
It's not, Private is the default. I've had mine, on various computers, randomly switch to Public for whatever reason which is as you say, (daft).
Thanks for this - I thought it was just me, randomly changing the network type while half-asleep. It's good now to learn that it is Microsoft randomly changing the network type while (>) half asleep.....
 
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Do you HAVE to use Nitroshare? What about just doing an FTP file transfer? When all else fails, back to basics!
 

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I just thought I'd mention that when it comes to networking, I've found sometimes tricky differences between Win10 Home and Win 10 Pro, and definitely things you can do when using Pro that one cannot do when using Home.
If it makes any differences, it would be nice of folks to perhaps edit (as needed) any posts to reflect whether they are using and/or whether the suggestions they are providing are for Win10 Home or Pro.
 

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That's a great observation but most times, when I'm making suggestions to an OP its relevant to the OS of the OP. Most of the suggestions work on both. That being said, if I came across something that wasn't included in Home, like gpedit.msc, Bitlocker, etc, then I'd mention this fact. Otherwise, it's assumed that the advice is compatible and works on both.
 

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Do you HAVE to use Nitroshare? What about just doing an FTP file transfer? When all else fails, back to basics!
I'm all for 'back to basics' so my first reaction to your post is 'No, I don't HAVE to use Nitroshare'. I have then spent about 10 hours over the days that have elapsed since reading your post trying to setup and use FTP between Linux Mint 20 and Windows 10. The net result is absolutely zero, after a lot of complicated (not complex,but error prone) messing about in Windows IIS ( a capability I promised myself 25 years ago that I would NEVER touch again), and trying to answer question to myself about SSL etc. And that's just the Windows side of the equation. I looked at Filezillla and was quite deterred by the amount of options I had to specify, many of which required advanced, not basic, knowledge. Indeed, none of this was basic stuff. In contrast Nitroshare was up and running in a couple of minutes (having been helped by this forum to understand Private versus Public Network). So, the naswer to your question is actually 'Yes, I HAVE to use Nitorshare because I like getting back to basics'.
 
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