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Problem after installing new battery

This is a discussion on Problem after installing new battery within the Windows 10 Support forums, part of the Tech Support Forum category. Originally Posted by usingpc What if I don't want to take the laptop apart to change that? And to take


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Old 03-09-2020, 11:30 PM   #21
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What if I don't want to take the laptop apart to change that? And to take it to a technician would probably cost a bundle. It's also an awfully strange coincidence that all of a sudden the CMOS (is that a backup battery of some kind?) would have a problem right when I was changing the regular battery. Are you certain?
if there is no other way of accessing the battery, then you have no choice but to take it apart. Yes, the CMOS battery is a backup. The CMOS battery provides power to the CMOS when the computer is not plugged in and the main battery is not installed. The CMOS is a type of volatile memory that stores your BIOS settings and real time clock settings. It is volatile because it needs power in order to store data. It loses data when its power supply is cut off. This is the only logical reason that I can think of that would cause this. I'm certain that a low CMOS battery will cause this, but I'm not certain that it's the only thing going on with that laptop. Other things could be going on that we haven't figured out yet. Five years is long enough to require a replacement of the CMOS battery. It takes much shorter than that to deplete the CMOS battery if the system has a poor main battery and stays unplugged for extended periods. In this case, you're obviously removing the main battery while the system is unplugged, correct? If so, and the CMOS battery is low, then the system is momentarily left with no power to sustain the CMOS memory, so it loses its data, which means BIOS settings are lost and factory defaults are loaded instead, and the setup utility loads at power up so that you can set bios settings before proceeding with normal startup. This recurs every time you unplug the AC adapter and remove the main battery.
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Old 03-10-2020, 09:49 AM   #22
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Are there standard batteries or do I need to find a specific CMOS that fits my Toshiba? Because that may be difficult.
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Old 03-10-2020, 10:05 AM   #23
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I found one and it apparently has to be soldered. Obviously that makes it unworkable since I'm not comfortable with that.

Also, and this is the worst part of it, my laptop will periodically just shut off. I can deal with the setup screen because I can click past it in a few seconds, but why is the whole laptop shutting off at random points? Could this be a BIOS setting?
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Old 03-10-2020, 10:55 AM   #24
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I've also noticed my battery power (on the new battery I have kept installed) seems to be going down pretty fast. Is this a clue to something?
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Old 03-10-2020, 12:33 PM   #25
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They are not standard, so every manufacturer decides which type to use in their systems, but the most common CMOS battery that I've seen is the CR2032 type. Other sizes apart from 2032 are also used, especially thinner ones on laptops, but it's always the coin cell type battery. However, how it is plugged into the laptop depends on how this laptop is built. Some have a slot into which you simply plug in the replacement battery, but others have the battery welded to two lead wires with a small connector at the end which plugs onto a matching connector on the motherboard, with the battery itself and terminals insulated using heat shrink sleeve, like this https://www.amazon.com/CR2032-Batter.../dp/B074PB82DT

It sounds complicated, but it isn't. Of course, you're better off first knowing which size the laptop uses, so that you order the exact same size.
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Old 03-11-2020, 01:07 AM   #26
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Well the experts have spoken and I sit here laughing.
Have you reset the laptop to see a new battery?
(you can search this on Google)

or
Jump past that screen and run the laptop as normal,
Go into settings
Look for power settings
Click on change settings for running on battery and change everything to never

Now run the laptop on battery until it turns off owing to low battery.
Leave for about 4 hours and then plug charger in and allow laptop to charge for at least 6 hours or longer if you can.

Now turn laptop back on and screen should have gone
Go back into setting and reset to the times you want

Ok now here is what has happened as the battery runs down the circuits cut back and have to be reset to see the new battery as new not old and run down.
This is why it goes flat so quickly

Good Luck there is nothing wrong with the CMOS battery or you would be getting a CMOS batt alarm
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Old 03-11-2020, 06:58 AM   #27
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After plowing through a few forum threads, it turns out, Toshiba is no longer including a separate CMOS battery in its products. Instead, the CMOS is powered by the main battery. Apparently, this is a new innovation by Toshiba, but Toshiba support is mostly silent about this.

This means you no longer have to take it apart to replace the CMOS battery. This also means removing the battery causes a loss of power by the CMOS and a loss of its data (bios settings and real-time clock settings). You can quickly test this theory as follows:

1. Set the date and time if they are incorrect. Shutdown, unplug the ac adapter and remove the battery.
2. Press and hold the power button for at least 5 seconds.
3. Insert the battery, plug in the adapter and turn on the laptop.
If the setup screen appears, check the date and time if they are still correct. If not, then the CMOS lost power and its data, hence the incorrect date and time settings.
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Old 03-11-2020, 09:24 AM   #28
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Thanks for the follow up, but I still don't know if the new battery I bought is bad or not. Does any of what either of you say imply that?
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Old 03-11-2020, 11:09 AM   #29
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Wink

Quote:
Originally Posted by usingpc View Post
Thanks for the follow up, but I still don't know if the new battery I bought is bad or not. Does any of what either of you say imply that?
The new battery COULD be bad. This is always a possibility, and in this case its too early to tell based on what you've told us or observed so far. If you want a yes or no answer, I'm afraid we are not in a position to say so with absolute certainty. What frosty said, though in a rush, is technically called recalibrating the new battery so as to allow Windows to correctly report the battery level as it falls/rises. You can try it and see if it still drainage

Did you perform the test in my previous reply?
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Old 03-17-2020, 07:26 PM   #30
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Quote:
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Thanks for the follow up, but I still don't know if the new battery I bought is bad or not. Does any of what either of you say imply that?
I have to say that these "button" batteries are very cheap.
If you think this is the issue, take your original battery to a jeweler or an electronics store and get a quality brand replacement. None of this online rubbish or $2 shop imports. You want brands like Eveready or Energiser.
Good luck.
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Old 03-17-2020, 08:41 PM   #31
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Talked to a tech guy and got my answers. The CMOS is a non-issue because it doesn't do much. The Toshiba utility screen came on when I put in my old battery because that's just a "Toshiba" thing. The old battery is running fine now. I mailed back the new battery as it was obviously faulty or didn't hold the charge right. Now all I have to do is find an OEM part, which may be tough.
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