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Backing up. Lost an important file

This is a discussion on Backing up. Lost an important file within the Windows 10 Support forums, part of the Tech Support Forum category. Hi I recently switched to a laptop running windows 10. I previously had a desktop running windows 7 which is


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Old 01-19-2020, 02:10 PM   #1
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Hi

I recently switched to a laptop running windows 10. I previously had a desktop running windows 7 which is not supported anymore.
I am a big user of notepad for various things.
I back these files up simply using 3 flash drives.
2 sit on my desk and one is in a safe at the bank.
To make a long story short, I had a very important notepad file that got reduced to 20% of it's normal content.
I have checked my 3 flash drives, my laptop and my old desktop. The file is there but 80% of the content is gone.
The good news if good news there is that this file is so important that I also kept 2 printed copies, one home and one at work.
So I still have the data but it's going to take me a good 10 hours to recreate the file.
I have checked the recycle bins, I have ran the %appdata% search and am currently running a program called EaseUS data recovery on my desktop and it has 2 1/2 hours to completion.
I also save some of my important notepad files in yahoo email.
I simply copy and paste them in an email to me. Then I moved the email in the appropriate yahoo folder, but of course I never did that to this file.
How shall I save my notepad files in the future?

Thanks

Pat
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Old 01-19-2020, 04:36 PM   #2
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Flash Drives are not permanent devices (actually nothing is). Ditto, Optical Discs. The best storage is HD + Cloud.
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Old 01-19-2020, 05:14 PM   #3
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Ok note taken

Thxs a lot

Pat
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Old 01-19-2020, 05:25 PM   #4
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I also would be quite disinclined to keep any data of substantial size and value in a plain text file.

If it were to take ten hours of data entry to re-create I would be looking at something other than plain text, whether a database, contacts manager, password manager, or similar where the ability to delete material "by accident" is significantly more difficult than it is in a plain text file.

I also agree that an external hard disk drive and cloud storage, both used as redundant of each other, are the best alternatives for data backup. If you do not wish to use cloud storage then two HDDs, with the most recent backup stored somewhere not in the same building with the original, is the best option. If your original data and all backups are in the same physical space if there were to be a fire, flood, etc., it would all get destroyed (or likely would) which really defeats the purpose of backing up to begin with.
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Old 01-21-2020, 08:38 PM   #5
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I prefer redundant backups. I back up files to a local external hard drive (on a schedule) using Genie Backup Manager. I then backup those same files to Crash Plan Pro (a paid Service) again, on a schedule.

How effective is it...don't know...I've only restored individual Files from Genie Backup Manager. Haven't had to do a restore from Crash Plan...knock on wood...
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Old 01-21-2020, 10:01 PM   #6
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There's a quote from Alien vs Predator, which I believe works for Backups as well:

"Same principle as a condom. I'd rather have one and not need it, than need it and not have one."

So basically, better safe than sorry...

Flash drives are used as portable storage, not backup devices....

Local copy + hard copy in safe + Local backup in Backup HDD + Cloud

The crappy part is getting them all sync'd up for small edits
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Old 01-22-2020, 12:01 AM   #7
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I don't know any details about this, or how much it would cost, but I know I've seen ads about scanning printed text and converting it to a pdf file, or something like that.
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Old 01-22-2020, 12:21 AM   #8
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If you have the full version of Adobe Acrobat, you can scan each page of your printed document and make a .PDF file, combining all pages into one large PDF. You can also scan to Microsoft Word, or Text using OCR. The cost is free if you have these programs, if your printer has a Document Feeder you can scan all at once. If you only have a glass scanner, you'll have to scan each page one at a time.
As stated, Flash drives fail all the time, they should only be used to move documents from one computer to another. Your backup plan should be an original on the computer, an External USB HDD (or secondary internal drive) + Cloud Storage (ie) Google Drive, One Drive, Amazon Drive etc. And good old Printed material.
Easeus is a great recovery program, if there is a copy of the document that hasn't been overwritten.
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Old 01-23-2020, 10:47 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by spunk.funk View Post
Your backup plan should be an original on the computer, an External USB HDD (or secondary internal drive) + Cloud Storage (ie) Google Drive, One Drive, Amazon Drive etc. And good old Printed material.
Easeus is a great recovery program, if there is a copy of the document that hasn't been overwritten.
All right I am ready to look into that cloud storage (Busy life). I only know about icloud from apple which I use.
Where is the cloud? I did a bing search and got several results. I hate to back up on the wrong site.
Is it totally safe? 10% of my files are very personal or financial. I hate to hear on the news that my data was compromised as I hear every so often for various sites.

Thxs

Pat
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Old 01-23-2020, 04:35 PM   #10
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With your Microsoft Account, you get 15GB of free cloud service. That's what ONE NOTE is.
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Old 01-24-2020, 08:36 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vaindioux View Post
Is it totally safe? 10% of my files are very personal or financial. I hate to hear on the news that my data was compromised as I hear every so often for various sites.
Nothing is 100% safe, which is why you need redundant backup options to increase your chances of recovery when disaster hits. Data loss is very expensive. You've only experienced a taste of it (hours of work) and you're lucky you have a hard copy. Without a cloud backup, your important data is sitting ducks on your local storage devices (internal drive, flash drives). You can further secure your data in the cloud by using an encrypted container to store them, then store the container in the cloud instead of storing individual unencrypted files. You can use the same approach on your Windows computer and local storage devices because the unencrypted data they contain is ready for the taking if you get affected by malware.
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Old 01-25-2020, 05:39 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stancestans View Post
Nothing is 100% safe, which is why you need redundant backup options to increase your chances of recovery when disaster hits. Data loss is very expensive. You've only experienced a taste of it (hours of work) and you're lucky you have a hard copy. Without a cloud backup, your important data is sitting ducks on your local storage devices (internal drive, flash drives). You can further secure your data in the cloud by using an encrypted container to store them, then store the container in the cloud instead of storing individual unencrypted files. You can use the same approach on your Windows computer and local storage devices because the unencrypted data they contain is ready for the taking if you get affected by malware.
Ok so where do I go to start?

Thxs

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Old 01-25-2020, 07:08 AM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vaindioux View Post
Ok so where do I go to start?

Thxs

Pat
My encryption tool of choice is Veracrypt. See https://www.google.com/search?q=veracrypt
Check out the video tutorials as well if you prefer.

Another option is to use a password-protected archive, for example a zip, rar or 7zip archive to store your data, then upload the archive to a cloud service of your choice. See https://www.google.com/search?q=7zip+password+protected for more information.

Windows 10 comes with OneDrive, which offers 5GB free cloud space. OneDrive is Microsoft's cloud storage service. There are others that were mentioned earlier, that offer more storage space for free. Feel free to Google them and check them out.
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Old 01-25-2020, 07:36 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by vaindioux View Post
All right I am ready to look into that cloud storage (Busy life). I only know about icloud from apple which I use.
Where is the cloud? I did a bing search and got several results. I hate to back up on the wrong site.
Is it totally safe? 10% of my files are very personal or financial. I hate to hear on the news that my data was compromised as I hear every so often for various sites.

Thxs

Pat
Didn't you say you have Crashplan? Crashplan is an online backup service and you can restore multiple versions of the same notepad file from your Crashplan account. I hate the term "cloud storage", it's just marketing B.S. The "cloud" is the internet.
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Old 01-26-2020, 05:47 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stancestans View Post
My encryption tool of choice is Veracrypt. See https://www.google.com/search?q=veracrypt
Check out the video tutorials as well if you prefer.

Another option is to use a password-protected archive, for example a zip, rar or 7zip archive to store your data, then upload the archive to a cloud service of your choice. See https://www.google.com/search?q=7zip+password+protected for more information.

Windows 10 comes with OneDrive, which offers 5GB free cloud space. OneDrive is Microsoft's cloud storage service. There are others that were mentioned earlier, that offer more storage space for free. Feel free to Google them and check them out.
Thanks so much that's very helpful to get me started.

Pat
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Old 01-26-2020, 05:48 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Fred Garvin View Post
Didn't you say you have Crashplan?
No, I never said I had crashplan. I will look into it.

Thxs a lot

Pat
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