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This is a discussion on Ram within the RAM and Power Supply Support forums, part of the Tech Support Forum category. Hi Guys unsure where this thread belongs, sorry if it's in the wrong place. I want to spray my RAMs


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Old 03-13-2016, 05:36 AM   #1
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Hi Guys unsure where this thread belongs, sorry if it's in the wrong place.
I want to spray my RAMs outer heat think, chk-d u-tupe and it seems easy enough to remove, (hair dryer)
However have you any idea how I can cut out a shape that will cover the parts I don't want sprayed, see picture, I am hopeless at describing what I mean..

Many thanks
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Old 03-13-2016, 10:33 AM   #2
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Spray? As in paint?

Cover areas with masking tape, and trim with an exacto knife. Use the green painters tape for less bleed under.
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Old 03-14-2016, 06:42 AM   #3
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Quote:
I want to spray my RAMs outer heat think
I think that is a very bad idea! It's "heat" sink! Not a decorative cover. You cover it up with a layer of paint and you might as well wrap it in a blanket.

Do you spend your days gazing inside your case at your RAM or what's happening on your monitors?
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Old 03-14-2016, 07:09 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill_Bright View Post
I think that is a very bad idea! It's "heat" sink! Not a decorative cover. You cover it up with a layer of paint and you might as well wrap it in a blanket.

Do you spend your days gazing inside your case at your RAM or what's happening on your monitors?
If you don't get the why of it, ?

thanx for your input though
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Old 03-14-2016, 07:34 AM   #5
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Quote:
If you don't get the why of it, ?
??? No, I don't get the why of it. Do you understand the "why" of heat sinks?

There is absolutely no reason to paint a heat sink other than to make it look pretty. And while I have no issues with having the case interior look nice, it should NEVER be done if it compromises cooling. As noted by the last line in my signature, I take heat very seriously. Compromising cooling decreases stability and stability is critical in high-speed, high-density digital devices like ICs (processors and memory "chips"). And when stability is compromised, the risk of data loss and even hardware damage increases too, not to mention component aging is increased.

Note that many RAM makers make RAM with different color heat sinks just for computer enthusiasts who want the looks of their case interiors to stand out. Corsair, for example, makes the same RAM in black, gold, blue and red. If the color of your RAM is that important, then I would urge you to buy new RAM in the color you want instead of covering your RAM's heat sinks with a coat of paint. Even if you buy high-end heat conductive paint, adding any layer of any material adversely impacts the "emissivity" of the heat sink.
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Old 03-14-2016, 08:02 AM   #6
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I agree with Bill. The reason a heatsink is used is to get rid of heat. If you paint it then you will be keeping the heat in. As Bill says if you want your RAM to be a certain colour then you can buy RAM where the heatsink is the colour you want.

The biggest problems most of the time when it comes to hardware is cooling the last thing you want is to increase the chance of failure. Whilst RAM is cheap I'm sure like me you would rather have 30 quid in your pocket than have to spend it on some new RAM.
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Old 03-14-2016, 08:27 AM   #7
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I think Magician777 might be talking about a thermal bond.
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Old 03-14-2016, 09:31 AM   #8
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I don't know what you mean by thermal bond. Thermal bond, to me, is used to adhere things together - like glass to the frame (as "glazing") and it is generally a heat insulator, not conductor of heat.
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Old 03-14-2016, 10:17 AM   #9
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It should be anodized aluminum, if you can take the covers off, then sand with fine paper to get to bare aluminum, then re-anodize. It's an easy process and can be done in your kitchen, providing you have ventilation. Need to look it up though.
Drawback is that multiple colors is difficult, but not impossible.

Personally though, I'd sand the finish from the parts you want different colors, then use permanent markers to color, it would be faster. Too bad you have dark coolers, markers would work well over a light anodize.

I'm with the rest, paint would act as an insulator and likely cause overheating.
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Old 03-14-2016, 10:37 AM   #10
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But even anodized aluminum is not very conductive. In fact, it is considered an insulator The only reason it is used is to prevent corrosion and minimize scratching - and to shunt ESD around sensitive devices.
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Old 03-14-2016, 10:44 AM   #11
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Question/Suggestion: Do you like LED's. If so why not just get a RAM fan kit that has LED fans on them.....now you have color and cooling.

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Old 03-14-2016, 10:54 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bassfisher6522 View Post
Question/Suggestion: Do you like LED's. If so why not just get a RAM fan kit that has LED fans on them.....now you have color and cooling.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Eu0D8lykuTY
Wow thanx for this
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Old 03-14-2016, 11:13 AM   #13
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LEDs do nothing for performance so not really into them (especially if more fan noise will be introduced too). But I have to say, that looks pretty cool.
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Old 03-14-2016, 11:47 PM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill_Bright View Post
But even anodized aluminum is not very conductive. In fact, it is considered an insulator The only reason it is used is to prevent corrosion and minimize scratching - and to shunt ESD around sensitive devices.
Freshly polished aluminum is rated 1.0 for heat conductivity, anodized aluminum is rated .9, and if you really look into aluminum pretty much everything you see can be considered 'anodized'
Anodizing is essentially controlling the natural and unavoidable oxidation of aluminum.

Edit: it does provide insulation in the electrical sense, but very little in terms of heat.
Also, for the OP, the hard,gritty grey 'ink' erasers work well to take anodizing off. (will also remove the copper from copper/zinc pennies if you want a 'silver' penny)
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Old 03-15-2016, 06:06 AM   #15
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I would still recommend just buying RAM in the color you want.

Those heat spreaders are very thin and don't take much to bend. But because of the potentials for ESD and physical damage to the contacts, it would be too risky to do anything to the RAM with the heat spreader attached to the RAM.

I have removed heat spreaders before (to see if some bad RAM had any apparent damage) and it was not that easy. Turns out the TIM (thermal interface material) used was adhesive TIM. I ended up slightly bending one of the shields and it never fit snuggly after that. Good thing the RAM was already bad.

And of course, as noted here removing the heat spreader voids the warranty! Since most RAM today has a lifetime warranty, this is a decision that must be taken carefully and with deliberation.
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Old 03-15-2016, 10:24 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill_Bright View Post
I would still recommend just buying RAM in the color you want.

Those heat spreaders are very thin and don't take much to bend. But because of the potentials for ESD and physical damage to the contacts, it would be too risky to do anything to the RAM with the heat spreader attached to the RAM.

I have removed heat spreaders before (to see if some bad RAM had any apparent damage) and it was not that easy. Turns out the TIM (thermal interface material) used was adhesive TIM. I ended up slightly bending one of the shields and it never fit snuggly after that. Good thing the RAM was already bad.

And of course, as noted here removing the heat spreader voids the warranty! Since most RAM today has a lifetime warranty, this is a decision that must be taken carefully and with deliberation.
I see your point Bill_Bright, and I have my doubts now, about spraying, I felt my ram sticks, while playing Assassin Creed 3, they were luke warm, unsure of the temps they can reach before being damaged, so luke warm might be there max, or not.

Back to the spraying, I must add there only being partially sprayed, in fact it might be about a 3rd of ram stick that will be covered, the long flat centres will not be touched..

Indecently any pointers to 4 x 4 gb ram stick with led perhaps blue and red ?.. example 1 blue next red then blue you get the meaning, and the spray debate would be over
many many thanx, to all, it has been helpful
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Old 03-15-2016, 10:32 AM   #17
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Warm is good. That means heat is being extracted from the memory modules themselves.
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Old 03-17-2016, 01:22 PM   #18
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Quote:
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Warm is good. That means heat is being extracted from the memory modules themselves.

After reading all answers, (many thanx) I decided to go and buy the
Avexir
Core Red Series 8GB (2x4GB) DDR3 PC3-12800C11 1600MHz Dual Channel Memory Kit (AVD3U16001104)





Very Glad I did, I think perhaps the ram sticks I removed were better performers than these, but I'm a shallow guy and I need bling
Ordered Wed arrived Thursday.
What do you think ?
I've been at this build from, I think, Nov 2015 but it's coming along, I want to sleeve my GPU cables but it looks difficult for there small loop cable things as well, any idea's, that is now my next step, sleeve GPU feeds.
See picture
feel free to give me idea's, (cable sleeve these loop things)
if possible go easy on the criticism
1st build.




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Old 03-19-2016, 01:51 PM   #19
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never heard of that make so I can't comment. Build looks good, do you use a push pull config on your water cooler?
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Old 03-19-2016, 03:08 PM   #20
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I have to say the look is impressive and I didn't really grasp the reason for what you were trying to do until I see this final picture. Great job everyone who participated here!
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