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PC shuts off after a few seconds

This is a discussion on PC shuts off after a few seconds within the RAM and Power Supply Support forums, part of the Tech Support Forum category. Hi, I have the "$1600 Intel build" from several years ago: Intel i7-4770K CPU @ 3.5GHz GTX 970 4GB (EVGA


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Old 06-08-2019, 10:42 AM   #1
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Hi, I have the "$1600 Intel build" from several years ago:

Intel i7-4770K CPU @ 3.5GHz
GTX 970 4GB (EVGA ftw+)
G.SKILL Ripkaws DDR3 16 GB RAM (2x8GB 1333 MHz)
ASUS Sabertooth Z87
SeaSonic SS-760XP2 power supply
Cooler Master HAF case

Just noticed this morning that the PC wouldn't turn on. Unplugged power for a bit, tried again and it turned on for 3 seconds then shut off. No beeps or anything. Once again power button does nothing. Doing the unplug routine does the same few second power up.

Opened up the case and looked around, gave everything an air blast and a jiggle, still same. Also tried a second power outlet.

Any ideas? If power supply is bad, should I go with the current Intel $1600 build's recommended EVGA 750 GQ? (btw it needs a carriage return on the Recommended Builds page; it's crammed up with the Case)
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Old 06-08-2019, 12:05 PM   #2
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(btw it needs a carriage return on the Recommended Builds page; it's crammed up with the Case)
Done! Thanks for pointing that out.
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Old 06-09-2019, 06:19 AM   #3
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If power supply is bad, should I go with the current Intel $1600 build's recommended EVGA 750 GQ?
Unfortunately, you did not provide your full system specs. For example, we don't know what type and how many drives or fans your PSU must support.

But using my favorite PSU calculator, and increasing CPU Utilization to 100%, adding a couple drives and 3 case fans, and setting Computer Utilization and Gaming to 16 hours/day to pad the results a little more to compensate for capacitor aging and to add some headroom for future expansion, we can see here that 750W is way more than you need.

You could get by with a quality 500W supply but if me, I would go for a quality 550 to 650W. If you like EVGA (and that is my preferred brand), I might suggest the EVGA SuperNOVA 650 G+ Gold with it's generous 10 year warranty and current really nice sell price.

Edit add: Just noticed Newegg has the similar spec'ed EVGA SuperNOVA G3 650W for $79.99 with the $20 rebate. The G3 series PSUs from EVGA have slightly smaller physical dimensions to give you a little more elbow room inside your case. However, it comes with "just" a 7-year warranty.
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Old 06-09-2019, 09:41 AM   #4
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Thanks Bill, I'll likely go with the G3 if it turns out to be the PS. A friend is suggesting I do the "paperclip" test.

Another says it's likely the mobo or cpu and suggested I video the POST. Does this tell us anything?:

https://cl.ly/73fd6d2c9e64
https://cl.ly/cb9111fec76b

Pls ignore the (lack of) cable management it was my first PC build so I just wanted to get it done.
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Old 06-09-2019, 10:17 AM   #5
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A friend is suggesting I do the "paperclip" test.
Ummm, sorry but your friend's suggestion makes no sense at all.

All the paperclip test does is tell you if your PSU will turn on, or not. Clearly we all know it already turns on.

But the paperclip test is pretty worthless regardless because it does not tell you if all 3 required voltages (+12VDC, +5VDC, or +3.3VDC) are present. It does not tell you if they are within the allowed 5% tolerances, nor does it tell you if ripple is being sufficiently suppressed. Finally, it supplies no load for the PSU and all PSUs need a proper load to be properly tested. In the case of computer PSUs, they need a variety of loads.

I am not sure what you are trying to show us in your videos. I hear your optical drive spin up - that sounds normal. You would have to look at your motherboard manual to learn what those LEDs mean.
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Old 06-09-2019, 11:09 AM   #6
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I am not sure what you are trying to show us in your videos. I hear your optical drive spin up - that sounds normal. You would have to look at your motherboard manual to learn what those LEDs mean.
The solid red southeast of the fan is CPU, the one that briefly flashes to right of the RAM is DRAM.

I don't know what they're supposed to tell me - is red good? Is it bad, and turns green if good? My manual doesn't tell me anything.

Is the last one to light the problem? (in this case DRAM)

I removed the RAM and tried each in various slots, didn't help. I also tried resetting CMOS.
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Old 06-09-2019, 02:01 PM   #7
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I don't know what they're supposed to tell me - is red good? Is it bad, and turns green if good? My manual doesn't tell me anything.
:( Oh? When I look at page 1-22, it tells me lots about your LEDs. There's more on page 1-25 and 1-33
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Old 06-11-2019, 04:41 PM   #8
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Could it be that the CPU doesn't have enough thermal grease. I had the same problem, and that's what it was.
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Old 06-11-2019, 06:02 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by esark33 View Post
Hi, I have the "$1600 Intel build" from several years ago:

Intel i7-4770K CPU @ 3.5GHz
GTX 970 4GB (EVGA ftw+)
G.SKILL Ripkaws DDR3 16 GB RAM (2x8GB 1333 MHz)
ASUS Sabertooth Z87
SeaSonic SS-760XP2 power supply
Cooler Master HAF case

Just noticed this morning that the PC wouldn't turn on. Unplugged power for a bit, tried again and it turned on for 3 seconds then shut off. No beeps or anything. Once again power button does nothing. Doing the unplug routine does the same few second power up.

Opened up the case and looked around, gave everything an air blast and a jiggle, still same. Also tried a second power outlet.

Any ideas? If power supply is bad, should I go with the current Intel $1600 build's recommended EVGA 750 GQ? (btw it needs a carriage return on the Recommended Builds page; it's crammed up with the Case)

Just take everything off the motherboard but the bare necessities. No hard drive, only a video card unless one is built in- then use that. Attach DVD/CD players or any other peripherals except a keyboard You could have a processor that is getting too hot, but usually not that quickly if you have a fan on it running. If you can get in the CMOS and monitor temperatures that might be helpful.


I would also suggest taking the motherboard out and attach the power supply and see if it will boot then. I had a friend that no matter what his MB woudl not boot. I put in 2 different MB and different CPU and ram and still would not boot, but out of the case all booted without a problem. Unknowingly the fan in his office had a slight over-arching going on and was discharging into his case and magnetizing it. You could take paper clips and watch them stick to the side of the case. The system would not boot due to a magnetic discharge from the case to the MB.


Tom in Dallas
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Old 06-12-2019, 07:49 AM   #10
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Could it be that the CPU doesn't have enough thermal grease. I had the same problem, and that's what it was.
If replacing the TIM (thermal interface material) fixed your problem, it is much more likely the original application was applied incorrectly or the cured bond was broken some how and insulating air was allowed to get in between the mating surfaces.

The most efficient transfer of heat occurs with direct metal to metal contact so the only purpose of TIM is to fill the microscopic pits and valleys in the mating surfaces to push out any insulating air that might get trapped in there. Any excess TIM is actually in the way and counterproductive to the heat transfer process.

While a CPU can go from cold to overheated in just a few clock cycles, a bad application of TIM would not prevent a computer from at least trying to turn on - as is the problem here.

Quote:
Unknowingly the fan in his office had a slight over-arching going on and was discharging into his case and magnetizing it. You could take paper clips and watch them stick to the side of the case. The system would not boot due to a magnetic discharge from the case to the MB.
There was something very different, odd and wrong going on there as there is no way a properly mounted motherboard could ever be electronically (or magnetically) isolated from a case. Motherboards are intentionally grounded to cases via 5 - 8 (depending on motherboard form factor and shape) case standoffs.

Motherboards are also intentionally grounded through the case's back plane where every expansion card plugged into a motherboard slot/socket is secured to the back of the case.

Motherboards are also intentionally grounded via dozens of points surrounding the I/O connections on the case/motherboard rear I/O shield.

Finally, motherboards are also intentionally grounded through every power connector that goes back to the PSU which, of course, is grounded directly to the case through direct contact with the case and through the 4 PSU mounting screws.

So for any magnetic charge to build up in the case - and it would have to be a steel case, not aluminum, that would be a very strange and unique scenario in the first place. But to then somehow dump that charge to the motherboard inside, it would be exponentially strange, and impossible with a properly mounted motherboard.

Personally, I suspect this "over arcing" office fan was generating and emitting excessive EMI/RFI that was wrecking havoc on the nearby computer.

I would get rid of the fan and use a AC Outlet Tester to ensure all the outlets in that facility are properly wired and grounded to Earth ground. If a fault is shown, have it fixed by a qualified electrician.
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Old 06-12-2019, 09:19 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by angeles75 View Post
Could it be that the CPU doesn't have enough thermal grease. I had the same problem, and that's what it was.
I don't think so, only because the PC has been fine for years. If such was the case I'd suspect it would have happened sooner.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jazzwineman View Post
Just take everything off the motherboard but the bare necessities. No hard drive, only a video card unless one is built in- then use that.
Good thinking, thanks.

Luckily I have a friend that was about to sell his "old" mobo and CPU, so I took it off his hands. Booted up fine, so it was either mobo/CPU/both.

We're good now, thx jazzwineman & angeles75.
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