Go Back   Tech Support Forum > Hardware Support > RAM and Power Supply Support

User Tag List

Computer randomly turned off, won't turn back on

This is a discussion on Computer randomly turned off, won't turn back on within the RAM and Power Supply Support forums, part of the Tech Support Forum category. After I had temporarily stepped away from my computer, I came back to find it completely off, and hitting the


Like Tree1Likes
Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 04-10-2020, 04:24 PM   #1
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 264
OS: Windows 10

My System


After I had temporarily stepped away from my computer, I came back to find it completely off, and hitting the power button to turn it back on did nothing. When I unplugged it from the power strip and plugged it back into a separate plug directly in a wall outlet, it turned on for about 3 seconds - fans, lights, sounds - but then shut off again. If I let it sit for a minute or two, unplug the power cable from the back and then plug it back in, that process repeats (turn on then shut off). I have also unplugged everything -- externally and internally -- except for the main hard drive in an effort to reduce the power load.

The only change I've made to the computer lately is a new video card - a GeForce GTX 1650 Super that I've had for about a week with no issues. I've encoded lots of video in the mean time (100% CPU load) and didn't notice any issues with that either.

The power supply -- a XFX PRO850W XXX Edition -- is rather old (purchased in Dec 2011) and my first guess is that it has gone bad. Not sure if it makes any difference, but when the computer temporarily turns on, the fan on top of the power supply does spin. I do not have another power supply I can test.

Any thoughts?
gord is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 04-10-2020, 04:35 PM   #2
Windows Tech Team
 
Join Date: Dec 2019
Location: Staunton, VA
Posts: 605
OS: Windows 10 Pro, 64-bit, Version 1909

My System


I suspect you are correct that the power supply has failed - functionally if not completely.

I also suspect you're in a time crunch to get this fixed, and if that's the case, I'd just buy a new power supply and try it. If not, however, read on.

It is very hand to have a power supply tester on hand for occasions such as this, and they're cheap. I have one very much like this Kingwin tester, and it's served me well when I've needed to use it. For a couple of bucks more, you can get one that's more sophisticated and gives you voltage value readouts as opposed to just indicator lights, like this SODIAL tester. These give you quick, hard data regarding whether a power supply has died or is in the process of dying, so if you're not in a hurry this would be something you could use to confirm your suspicion before buying a power supply.

It could, of course, be something else entirely, but my gut goes to the same place yours does, as I've seen power supplies that are not 100% dead, dead, dead that are functionally useless.
__________________
Brian
It is better to be hated for what you are than to be loved for what you are not.
~ André Gide
britechguy is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 04-10-2020, 06:40 PM   #3
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 264
OS: Windows 10

My System


I just tried a 650W power supply I had in another computer and it did the same thing.
gord is offline   Reply With Quote
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 04-10-2020, 06:57 PM   #4
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 264
OS: Windows 10

My System


Sorry - wanted to add to post above but it wouldn't let me edit.

The 650W not working tells me that's not enough power or I have bigger problems.

Thoughts on this as a replacement? https://www.newegg.com/evga-supernov...1HU-00J7-004V4
gord is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2020, 07:25 AM   #5
Visiting Tech
 
Bill_Bright's Avatar

Microsoft Most Valuable Professional
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Nebraska, USA
Posts: 1,467
OS: Win10 64-bit Professional

My System


Quote:
The 650W not working tells me that's not enough power or I have bigger problems.
Assuming the components listed in your system specs are correct, 650W is way more than enough.

In fact, you could easily get by with a 550W - with wiggle room to spare. As seen here, 550W is plenty and note I even padded the results by increasing CPU utilization to 100% TDP, added a bunch of drives and fans, and said you game for 16 hours per day. BTW, that is the only PSU calculator worth using. Period. Hands down. End of story. Drop mic!

Sadly, with the same symptoms appearing with a second PSU, it sure is unlikely your original XFX PSU is at fault.

You don't show how your RAM is configured. Assuming 2 x 8GB, you might try 1 stick at a time.

Unfortunately, there is no way to test the CPU or the motherboard without having another CPU or another motherboard. But that always introduces the possibility of a bad motherboard, for example, destroying the 2nd test CPU. :( Or damage due to accidental damage due to mishandling or ESD when swapping out components.

Any beeps? When all is working correctly, there typically is a single, short beep indicating a successful POST (power on self-test). But of course, that requires a system speaker and most cases no longer have them and many motherboards don't either. But the ATX Form Factor standard still requires motherboards support system speakers through the front panel I/O connector and your board is no exception.

If a board does not include a small piezoelectric speaker, I always add them to our builds here. Being old-school, I find that single short beep reassuring. It is very inexpensive to add a System Speaker. Note that price is for 20 speakers!

As far as PSU testers, like multimeters they are NOT conclusive. I actually keep one just like that SODIAL tester in my tool bag I take on house calls. But they can only tell you if a voltage is missing, or way out of the allowed ±5% tolerance. These testers (and multimeters) do not test under a variety of loads (which is essential) nor do they test for ripple and other anomalies that affect computer stability. This is done by a qualified technician using an oscilloscope or a dedicated power supply analyzer - sophisticated (and expensive!) electronic test equipment requiring special training to operate, and a basic knowledge of electronics theory to understand the results. Therefore, conclusively testing a power supply is done in properly equipped electronics repair facilities.

So for most users (including many pros) that leaves swapping in a known good supply to test a PSU conclusively. And you did that.
gord likes this.
__________________
Bill (AFE7Ret)
Freedom is NOT Free!
Windows and Devices for IT, 2007 - 2018

Heat is the bane of all electronics!

───────────────────────────
Bill_Bright is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2020, 08:37 AM   #6
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 264
OS: Windows 10

My System


While it occurred to me to put in the spare power supply in my main computer, it didn't occur to me to put the original power supply in the spare computer. I just did that... and it worked. Now, the spare computer power requirements are much lower than the main one, but it looks as though the power supply is not the issue. I guess I need to cancel that order.

I guess anything is in play here. My next step is put the power supply back in the computer and start swapping out components. The first would be the video card since that's the most recent change (last one in, first one out).

I'm sure I have the cabling for the POST sound effect, but I seem to recall years ago trying that and never getting the sound, even when everything was working correctly. I guess I could try it again, but first things first.

PS - Would ESD take a week to materialize?
gord is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2020, 08:42 AM   #7
Team Manager
Microsoft Support
 
Corday's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Midlands of South Carolina
Posts: 25,981
OS: Windows10. In the past CP/M, DOS, Windows 95, 2000, 98SE, ME, Vista & Windows 7

My System


I'll go out on a limb here and suggest that your new graphics card, combined with the heavy use you gave it, raised temperatures and might have killed your MOBO. Recheck all connections. If all OK the only way to be sure with this type of hardware issue is to bring it to a shop with proper test equipment. Just buying new components is expensive and doesn't guarantee a fix since each piece is just a guess (MOBO, PSU,CPU etc.).
__________________

The stability of an OS is in direct proportion to the stability of the user.
Corday is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2020, 08:52 AM   #8
Visiting Tech
 
Bill_Bright's Avatar

Microsoft Most Valuable Professional
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Nebraska, USA
Posts: 1,467
OS: Win10 64-bit Professional

My System


Quote:
I'm sure I have the cabling for the POST sound effect
There's no cabling required. You just need a system speaker. It will plug into your motherboard's front panel I/O connector. I looked at an image of your board. As seen here, it is that long white connector, labeled "PANEL" in the lower right - the same connector where the case's power switch connects to your board. This image is of the Deluxe version of the board but yours is in the same place. You can click on that image and zoom in to get a closer look.

The speaker goes across the 4 top pins on the right. These sounds do NOT come out of your normal computer speakers (or headsets). The system speaker is a totally separate speaker.
__________________
Bill (AFE7Ret)
Freedom is NOT Free!
Windows and Devices for IT, 2007 - 2018

Heat is the bane of all electronics!

───────────────────────────
Bill_Bright is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2020, 09:02 AM   #9
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 264
OS: Windows 10

My System


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill_Bright View Post
There's no cabling required. You just need a system speaker. It will plug into your motherboard's front panel I/O connector. I looked at an image of your board. As seen here, it is that long white connector, labeled "PANEL" in the lower right - the same connector where the case's power switch connects to your board. This image is of the Deluxe version of the board but yours is in the same place. You can click on that image and zoom in to get a closer look.

The speaker goes across the 4 top pins on the right. These sounds do NOT come out of your normal computer speakers (or headsets). The system speaker is a totally separate speaker.
I realize that - IIRC, my case has a cable that, when connected to the motherboard, will produce an activity light on the front, a light for the power button and a POST sound effect produced through the case, not the speakers. That is what I was referring to. But thank you for the follow up.
gord is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2020, 09:14 AM   #10
Team Manager
Microsoft Support
 
Corday's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Midlands of South Carolina
Posts: 25,981
OS: Windows10. In the past CP/M, DOS, Windows 95, 2000, 98SE, ME, Vista & Windows 7

My System


Forgot to mention in my post how disgusting it is for manufacturers, to save a few pennies omitted system speakers. In the past, if someone called me, I could just have them listen and solve the problem.
__________________

The stability of an OS is in direct proportion to the stability of the user.
Corday is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2020, 09:44 AM   #11
Visiting Tech
 
Bill_Bright's Avatar

Microsoft Most Valuable Professional
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Nebraska, USA
Posts: 1,467
OS: Win10 64-bit Professional

My System


Quote:
I realize that - IIRC, my case has a cable that, when connected to the motherboard, will produce an activity light on the front, a light for the power button and a POST sound effect produced through the case, not the speakers. That is what I was referring to. But thank you for the follow up.
We're getting close to the same page here.

That same panel I/O header on the motherboard has a connection for the hard drive LED (the activity light) and power-on LED. It will also have 2 pins for the power switch and 2 pins for the reset switch. Then 4 pins for the speaker (though only 2 pins are used).

In the olden days, just about every computer case had a small traditional looking speaker, like this, that was 2.25 inches across. Despite the red and black wires, polarity did not matter.

Then most cases stopped coming with speakers to (1) as Corday noted, save a couple pennies from the cost and (2) because some motherboards starting coming with them. Motherboards and later cases (if the case had one) came with piezoelectric speakers like this one. If mounted on the motherboard, there were no wires, just the speaker.

If one came with the case, or was extra like the image above, polarity may matter with them. So if your case has a piezoelectric speaker, you may need to check again and make sure you connect it using the proper polarity (+ to + and - to -).

Either way, these speakers are not needed for proper operation of the computer. It is just that beep codes are some times helpful in troubleshooting.
__________________
Bill (AFE7Ret)
Freedom is NOT Free!
Windows and Devices for IT, 2007 - 2018

Heat is the bane of all electronics!

───────────────────────────
Bill_Bright is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-11-2020, 10:49 AM   #12
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 264
OS: Windows 10

My System


FWIW (maybe nothing, but throwing it out there just in case) - there are several lights on the motherboard itself that light up when it gets power.

Next step is replacing the video card with the old one to see if I get a different result.
gord is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2020, 07:17 AM   #13
Visiting Tech
 
Bill_Bright's Avatar

Microsoft Most Valuable Professional
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Nebraska, USA
Posts: 1,467
OS: Win10 64-bit Professional

My System


Check your motherboard manual. Some times, those lights simply mean some power is getting to the board. Some times, that is simply for aesthetics. Some times it is to remind us to unplug from the wall before removing/installing parts or doing other maintenance - ensuring all voltages have been removed thus preventing destructive shorts.

But some times, those lights are used for diagnostic purposes too - if they represent a specific pattern. The manual should indicate what that pattern (if any) means.
__________________
Bill (AFE7Ret)
Freedom is NOT Free!
Windows and Devices for IT, 2007 - 2018

Heat is the bane of all electronics!

───────────────────────────
Bill_Bright is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2020, 09:40 AM   #14
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 264
OS: Windows 10

My System


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill_Bright View Post
Check your motherboard manual. Some times, those lights simply mean some power is getting to the board. Some times, that is simply for aesthetics. Some times it is to remind us to unplug from the wall before removing/installing parts or doing other maintenance - ensuring all voltages have been removed thus preventing destructive shorts.

But some times, those lights are used for diagnostic purposes too - if they represent a specific pattern. The manual should indicate what that pattern (if any) means.
Yeah, the three green lights are for the TPU and EPU switches and standby power. They stay on all the time. The standby power is the 'reminder LED' you mentioned.

I unplugged every device from the motherboard except for one stick of RAM and the CPU. Same result - the DRAM and CPU red lights flashed once and went away. According to what I'm reading on the ASUS web site, if the red lights stay on, that's an indicator that something is wrong.

I ordered a system speaker like you recommended and it should be here Wednesday.
gord is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2020, 10:54 AM   #15
Visiting Tech
 
Bill_Bright's Avatar

Microsoft Most Valuable Professional
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Nebraska, USA
Posts: 1,467
OS: Win10 64-bit Professional

My System


Not sure if the speaker will help, but they are nice to have nevertheless. It might lead you to the CPU, but if there's a fault in the motherboard, it may just look like the CPU is faulty.

Sadly, only the motherboard maker can really and thoroughly test a motherboard.

Just remember, should you get rid of this motherboard, don't forget to take the speaker out too.
__________________
Bill (AFE7Ret)
Freedom is NOT Free!
Windows and Devices for IT, 2007 - 2018

Heat is the bane of all electronics!

───────────────────────────
Bill_Bright is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2020, 11:16 AM   #16
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 264
OS: Windows 10

My System


Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill_Bright View Post
Sadly, only the motherboard maker can really and thoroughly test a motherboard.
Seeing that the board is over 8 years old and out of warranty, I'm guessing that it isn't in either side's best interested to have it looked at?

Looks like I'm on the hunt for a new board (and processor to go with it).
gord is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2020, 11:57 AM   #17
Visiting Tech
 
Bill_Bright's Avatar

Microsoft Most Valuable Professional
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Nebraska, USA
Posts: 1,467
OS: Win10 64-bit Professional

My System


Troubleshooting and repair costs would probably be more than a new board.

I'd say after 8 years, it has served you well.
Quote:
Looks like I'm on the hunt for a new board (and processor to go with it).
Yeah. And since just about every new board today supports DDR4, you will need new RAM too. And then, of course, a new motherboard constitutes a new computer. And since OEM Windows licenses cannot legally be transferred to new computers, you most likely will need a new Windows license too since the vast majority of licenses are OEM and not full retail.

Might as well go for broke and go all in with an SSD drive too.

The good news just about anything you get today will run circles around what you had.
__________________
Bill (AFE7Ret)
Freedom is NOT Free!
Windows and Devices for IT, 2007 - 2018

Heat is the bane of all electronics!

───────────────────────────
Bill_Bright is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2020, 12:52 PM   #18
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 264
OS: Windows 10

My System


Thanks for all of the help. I've been lucky that my system has been so solid and reliable up to this point without any major issues.

I'll be taking this to the Building subforum from here on out.
gord is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2020, 01:16 PM   #19
Visiting Tech
 
Bill_Bright's Avatar

Microsoft Most Valuable Professional
 
Join Date: Dec 2004
Location: Nebraska, USA
Posts: 1,467
OS: Win10 64-bit Professional

My System


Quote:
I'll be taking this to the Building subforum from here on out.
Set your budget, define your needs and determine the primary purpose of the computer before posting. And if you already cancelled that PSU order, make sure you select and size up all your components and power needs before selecting your new PSU. Then get a quality PSU. I like to say you wouldn't buy a brand new Porsche then fill it up at the corner Tobacco and Bait shop.
__________________
Bill (AFE7Ret)
Freedom is NOT Free!
Windows and Devices for IT, 2007 - 2018

Heat is the bane of all electronics!

───────────────────────────
Bill_Bright is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 04-12-2020, 01:20 PM   #20
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2005
Posts: 264
OS: Windows 10

My System


I did cancel the new PSU order but is there a reason to replace the one I have? It works fine in the backup system I have, plus, since the secondary PSU also didn't fix the problem, wouldn't that rule out an issue with it?
gord is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is on
Smilies are on
[IMG] code is on
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Post a Question


» Site Navigation
 > FAQ
  > 10.0.0.2
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 01:32 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 2001 - 2018, Tech Support Forum

Windows 10 - Windows 7 - Windows XP - Windows Vista - Trojan Removal - Spyware Removal - Virus Removal - Networking - Security - Top Web Hosts