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This is a discussion on Best way to upgrade RAM with 4 memory slots? within the RAM and Power Supply Support forums, part of the Tech Support Forum category. Hello. My computer's performance is very bad and I believe I need to install more RAM. Currently, I have 6GB


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Old 01-25-2018, 02:39 AM   #1
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Hello. My computer's performance is very bad and I believe I need to install more RAM. Currently, I have 6GB of RAM and I "think" it would be best if I got 16GB RAM. Only 3 of the slots (2GB) are being used. I was wondering what would be the best way to upgrade. Would it be best if I bought 4 sticks of 4GB RAM, 2 sticks of 8GB RAM, or is it possible that I could buy maybe 1 stick and put it in the empty slot? If so, it would be OK for me to have 10GB RAM if that would work.

I have an HP Pavilion p6680t that's about 8 years old. The RAM speed is 1333.

Thank you,
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Old 01-25-2018, 02:58 AM   #2
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If you have 6 GB of RAM with Windows 7 (I think it's sufficient to provide a decent performance), you should troubleshoot performance issues and not upgrade RAM at the moment, unless you've confirmed that the RAM is under performing due to various reasons and that there are no issues with Applications or the Windows OS

Old PCs under-perform generally due to old CPUs and not RAM, that's my perspective, others may have a different opinion.

Start with identifying what is causing the performance block, Task Manager is a good place to start.
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Old 01-25-2018, 04:28 AM   #3
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I couldn't upload a screenshot of my Performance Manager, but it shows that my memory graph is mostly to the top with 104 Hard Faults/second and 91% Used Physical Memory. It shows that it's at 5.38GB. The CPU usage is also high in the graph, although it only shows 36% and 88% Maximum Frequency. That's how it typically looks when I use my computer (I have a lot of things open at once).

Maybe I should upgrade both RAM and CPU? I originally thought I should put in 16GB of RAM. I could try adding a card into the blank slot to make 8GB if that would work. Or maybe I should just get a new computer since it is 8 years old.
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Old 01-25-2018, 04:46 AM   #4
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RAM can and should be utilized up to 90-95% of capacity which is efficient usage, only if your requirement goes beyond that, should you think of upgrading the RAM. Under-utilization of RAM is actually a waste of resources.

Can you download an application called autoruns from sysinternals and post screenshots of the apps set to autorun ? Also can you attach a screenshot of the Task manager sorted by CPU usage ?

I just saw your post edit, faults do not translate into errors, they just mean that memory pages are retrieved from the page file instead of the memory.
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Old 01-26-2018, 03:20 AM   #5
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I wasn't able to figure out how to make it show only apps, so I took a screenshot of everything.

Task Manager Sorted by CPU Usage: https://imgur.com/CDuZ2rC

Autoruns 1: https://imgur.com/tzaOeTI

Autoruns 2: https://imgur.com/gFZ1bPF

Autoruns 3: https://imgur.com/D43vAn3

Autoruns 4: https://imgur.com/fP41NNB

Autoruns 5: https://imgur.com/HvurdgF

Autoruns 6: https://imgur.com/hUKRPAx

Autoruns 7: https://imgur.com/F6HctQu

Autoruns 8: https://imgur.com/cqwFpGZ

Autoruns 9: https://imgur.com/bym0Sdz

Autoruns 10: https://imgur.com/fP41NNB
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Old 01-26-2018, 09:16 AM   #6
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Did performance used to be fine?

According to the specs for that system, it does support 4 x 4GB of RAM. That indicates it will NOT support 8GB sticks.

If you want to upgrade your RAM, I recommend 2 x 4GB for 8GB total. 8GB is generally considered the "sweetspot" for W7. That is, less than 8GB and performance suffers, and more than 8GB and any performance gains tend to be marginal, at best. I recommend you visit the Crucial Memory Advisor to see what your system supports (other RAM makers typically have similar tools). You don't have to buy suggested RAM from Crucial, but you should buy RAM with the same specs as suggested. However, if you do buy from Crucial, they guarantee it will work.

Not sure what is meant by "RAM can and should be utilized up to 90-95% of capacity". It certainly "can" be used up to 90-95%. If it hits 100%, changes in amount or memory configuration are needed. But there is nothing that says RAM "should" be run at near capacity levels. Running at those levels does NOT make it more efficient. But it will make it run hotter most of the time which can increase aging if case cooling is lacking.

But before spending any money, there are other things you should do first.

First, clean out the clutter with Windows own Disk Cleanup or CCleaner. See what programs you have running with Windows when Windows starts. If you don't use them regularly, uninstall them, or set them to run on demand. Note that auto-update programs are often installed without user consent by default. The only auto-update you should have running is for Windows itself, and your security apps.

If you dinked with the Page File settings, change them back to Windows managed. It is highly unlikely you are an expert at virtual memory management. The folks at Microsoft are. Besides, that is NOT a set and forget setting.

How much free disk space do you have? You need to make sure you have lots of free disk space on your boot drive. I like to keep at least 30GB. If low, uninstall programs and files you installed but don't use, or move them to another drive. Google any program you are not aware of. If you don't know or cannot figure out what it is, leave it.

You should not have to defrag the drive, unless you dinked with those settings too. That said, manually defragging after cleaning out the clutter and uninstalling unused programs is a good idea.
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Old 01-27-2018, 08:32 AM   #7
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I honestly can't remember if the performance used to be fine, but I've been dealing with this for a very long time and have used multiple methods like CCleaner, tinkering with autostart programs, services, msconfig, Revo Uninstaller, etc. But until now, everyone said that my specs were more than enough. I've likely messed with the Page File settings, but how do I get to them to reset them to default?

I have 3 memory banks full out of my 4 (all 2GB). I did look on the Crucial site. Would it work to just buy a 2GB RAM and put it into the blank slot for a total of 8MB?

I know you said above 8GB is marginal, but the 4GB stick of RAM is only $15 more. Can I have three 2GB sticks and one 4GB stick? I keep getting conflicting information online about RAM. If I buy two 4GB RAM sticks of RAM, should I put one of them every other slot (I read that it should start with the slot closest to the CPU).

Crucial also offers SSD upgrade that I could afford. Do you think that could be beneficial?

Would it significantly help to upgrade from Windows 7 to 10?

Also, I forgot to mention that my programs (especially internet tabs) become unresponsive all the time and I have to End Task. This happens maybe 5 times a day (when I'm home all day using the computer. I have a lot of tabs open though). The computer also takes a very long time to restart. Hopefully RAM could fix this too.

Thank you for the help and advice.
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Old 01-27-2018, 10:24 AM   #8
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To check/reset your page file settings, go to Start > Control Panel > System. Click on the Advanced tab and under the Performance box, click Settings. In Windows 7, you'll need to click on Advanced System Settings on the left side to bring up the System Properties dialog.

In the Performance section, click Settings, then Advanced tab, then Change in the Virtual memory section.

Make sure the "Automatically manage paging file size for all drives" is checked. Then OK to work you way out and reboot.
Quote:
I have 3 memory banks full out of my 4 (all 2GB). I did look on the Crucial site. Would it work to just buy a 2GB RAM and put it into the blank slot for a total of 8MB?
"In theory", yes. It will work. Sadly, in practice, it does not always work due to slight differences in the RAM. The RAM is good, it just does not play well with other sticks.

If you can find the exact same brand and model number, that will increase your chances of no compatibility issues. Otherwise, try to find a stick with the exact same specs.

Replacing one of those 3 with a new pair may increase your chances of success.

As far as having 2 x 2GB + 1 x 4GB, again, "in theory" it should work. However, most motherboards support "Dual Channel" memory architecture when two identical sticks are installed in a "bank" (designated pair of slots). So it would be best to buy a new 2GB stick, or toss one of your 3 and buy a new pair of 2GB sticks, or a new pair of 4GB sticks.

If you go with a new pair of 4GB sticks, they hopefully will play well with the remaining pair of 2GB for a total of 12GB installed. However, if the 4GB sticks and the 2GB don't play well together, you can discard all the 2GB sticks and go just with 2 x 4GB for 8GB total.

Note it is very common during RAM upgrades to toss perfectly good smaller sticks. It is just a fact of life with computer upgrades.

As to how they should be installed, there is no industry standard so don't let anyone tell you how they should go unless they know your exact motherboard model number. Some motherboards require pairs be installed in slots 1 & 2 and 3 & 4. Other motherboards require you install the pairs in 1 & 3 and 2 & 4. So look in your manual or if you are lucky, your RAM slot pairs will be color coded.

As for your unresponsiveness and long times to restart, you still need to clean out the clutter and make sure you have plenty of free disk space for Windows to operate in. If Windows has no place to put temporary files (which it needs to do all the time), it will not matter how much RAM you have installed.

One last warning. Make sure you unplug the computer from the wall and you touch bare metal of the case interior to discharge any static in your body BEFORE you reach inside and before you even think of touching the RAM. And never touch the electrical contacts of the RAM. Note the RAM is keyed to only go in the slot one way. But it can be forced in wrong, likely damaging the RAM and the slot. So have good lighting and make sure you have it oriented correctly before inserting.
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Old 01-27-2018, 12:18 PM   #9
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OK. I'm going to try getting two 4MB RAM and put them in there alone, then add the two 2GB later to see if there's a difference. Thanks for your help. Hopefully, I can put off getting that new computer. I'll try to come back and update if this works.
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Old 01-27-2018, 12:31 PM   #10
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Please do keep us posted.
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Old 01-29-2018, 01:06 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill_Bright View Post
Did performance used to be fine?

Not sure what is meant by "RAM can and should be utilized up to 90-95% of capacity". It certainly "can" be used up to 90-95%. If it hits 100%, changes in amount or memory configuration are needed. But there is nothing that says RAM "should" be run at near capacity levels. Running at those levels does NOT make it more efficient. But it will make it run hotter most of the time which can increase aging if case cooling is lacking.
There is no point in saving Memory, if the memory page takes a back seat, it gets moved to the page file and not actively required to be placed in the RAM. So what is the point in keeping 8 GB of RAM when only 4 GB is going to be actively utilized by applications, anything over that is only a waste of resources. Stress your PC with the applications you would have running at a given time, and if it goes over 4 GB, it makes sense to upgrade.

By Increasing RAM you're only giving more bandwidth for the applications with poor coding or memory leaks to perform, end result providing a few more MBs to the OS and other applications to perform thereby "appearing" as an increase in response time, but does not actually fix the issue.

RAM should be replaced when the RAM is under-performing due to hardware issues, incorrect pairing etc, not because of your run of the mill performance issues.

4 GB RAM on a SSD with a good CPU/Mobo is sufficient to run Win 7 or Win 10, unless you have applications such as AutoCad/Photoshop or memory intense games which require more RAM, in which case it's good to revisit the available Memory.

--------------

@OP, regarding your issue, Chrome seems to be eating up a lot of your memory, I would start with first removing unwanted addins from chrome, and if possible, switch to a different browser such as Firefox or IE/Edge.

Also, go to Programs and Features and remove unwanted applications from the PC, I can see a lot of applications which run in the background which are not actively required (unless you feel differently).

Also, you seem to have performed MSCONFIG and removed items in the past, it's never good practice to just disable them, msconfig should be used for troubleshooting or testing purposes and the Run entry should be removed from the registry and not just disabled in msconfig, this has caused duplication of entries in the Run key.
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Old 01-29-2018, 08:04 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tristar
By Increasing RAM you're only giving more bandwidth for the applications with poor coding or memory leaks to perform, end result providing a few more MBs to the OS and other applications to perform thereby "appearing" as an increase in response time, but does not actually fix the issue.
"Poor coding or memory leaks"??? Sorry but this is not sound logic. You are using exceptions to dictate the (or rather your) rule. By far most of today's programs are not poorly coded nor do they suffer from memory leaks. Poorly coded programs do not become popular and any popular program that somehow develops a memory leak is quickly fixed by the developers - or they will quickly become unpopular and replaced by a competing program.

And "only giving more bandwidth" to those rare exceptions? Sorry, but that is simply not true at all. And it makes no sense.

All programs benefit when the OS has all the RAM it wants (not needs, but wants) to operate without restrictions. It is critical to remember that if the OS itself is allowed to operate freely, that leaves plenty of room for all your applications to optimally too - this includes resource hungry, and essential security programs.

If Windows needs to cache "high priority" data in the page file (even if that page file is on a fast SSD), performance is degraded. With only 4GB of RAM installed, that happens often. Whether the user notices that degradation or not is not the issue here since much depends on what the user is used to, and expecting.

Modern versions of Windows (W7, W8, W10 - but especially W10) are excellent at memory management. They are not "poorly coded" nor do they suffer from "memory leaks". Neither do Microsoft Office products, popular anti-malware programs, popular browsers, popular games, graphics editors, and other programs many of us use every day. You certainly don't have to run Autocad and resource intensive games to need more RAM. Even browsers with many tabs open can chew it up.

I certainly agree if you rarely use more than 4GB and you already have 8GB installed, it makes little sense to bump up your RAM to 16GB. That would just be a waste of money.

But that is not the point here. I was remarking about your claim that RAM "should" be run at 90 - 95% capacity. That is just not true. I say again,
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bill_Bright
But there is nothing that says RAM "should" be run at near capacity levels. Running at those levels does NOT make it more efficient.
Quote:
RAM should be replaced when the RAM is under-performing due to hardware issues, incorrect pairing etc, not because of your run of the mill performance issues.
Again, not sound logic. If run of the mill performance issues is caused by a lack of RAM, then it should be replaced. But nobody's talking about run of the mill performance here.

Quote:
4 GB RAM on a SSD with a good CPU/Mobo is sufficient to run Win 7 or Win 10
"Sufficient to run" is very different from "run optimally".

Yes, Windows will run with 4GB. But it will run better with 8GB. And when your operating system is running better, so will all your applications. But again, for most users, adding more than 8GB will yield no noticeable performance advantage.
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Old 01-29-2018, 11:13 PM   #13
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We can agree to disagree, it's neither going to change my opinion nor yours.

You should probably look at the number of machines killed by IObit or issues caused by MS updates and other "System mechanics" so they're not poorly coded ? You don't have to check the web, look at the number of people using such applications who have come back to this very forum asking how they can fix them. This is not a single update, people have been using such applications for ages rendering their machine unbootable. So there are poorly coded applications, Devs are aware and continue to provide them without fixes and naiive people continue to use them.

Again, my opinion, it should run at 90-95% for you to effectively utilize the RAM available, and your point of it heating, is wrong, there is very low power draw on RAM barely 3W, so unless you overclock, with standard voltages, you can utilize RAM up to 90-95% and won't face any heating issues, people face performance issues due to CPU cycles being eaten up or due to Hard drive performance not because of memory usage, that's just misinterpretation by the user since those big MB numbers make it appear like it's a big deal, unless there are hardware issues. Again, my opinion, you're definitely entitled to yours. If at any point you see memory pages eating up, it's because of poorly coded or memory leaking applications, not because you need more RAM. You can google 100% memory usage or 99% memory usage, 9 times out of 10, you're going to end up with the same answer, memory leak not because they need more RAM. Unused RAM is wasted RAM.

Will 8 GB give me better performance over 4GB, of course it will, will a 3.0 Ghz CPU work better than a 2.4Ghz CPU, of course it will, but if I'm facing performance issues I should identify root cause first and fix it, upgrading RAM is a band aid, allowing leaking applications to continue to run, but with more RAM available. RAM is available for cheap so it's easier to replace than a CPU/HDD, so people opt for it, of course they're going to see a performance difference, the field just got bigger, but hasn't fixed the issue.

Once you've identified and fixed the Root cause and then upgrading the RAM based on your usage is probably a good approach, again, my opinion.
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Old 01-30-2018, 09:16 AM   #14
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Quote:
We can agree to disagree, it's neither going to change my opinion nor yours.
Electronics do not work on opinions. I am not expressing my opinion. I am expressing facts.

Show us any white paper, study, report on RAM that says RAM "should" operate at near capacity levels as YOU claimed.

Having gobs more RAM than you need may be an inefficient use of your money, but that's it. Having more RAM than you need does not degrade performance as you suggested with your "should" opinion.

Quote:
Will 8 GB give me better performance over 4GB, of course it will
Thank you. Now the truth comes out!

Quote:
You should probably look at the number of machines killed by IObit or issues caused by MS updates and other "System mechanics" so they're not poorly coded ?
FTR, I have NEVER - not once - ever recommended the use of either IObit or System mechanics programs. In fact, I have repeatedly said they are not needed and often detrimental. So you can cherry pick programs if you want, they won't alter my comment that your exceptions don't make the rule.

And Windows Updates (which has nothing to do with this discussion) surely won't either. Yes, some have been "poorly coded". But (1) the reality is, the vast majority of users (by a very wide margin) never have problems with Windows Updates. But even if 1/2 of 1% of Windows 10 users have a problem with a Windows Update, that is still 2.5 million upset people. And 2.5 million upset people can make a lot of noise - especially when that noise is amplified by ill-informed bloggers, wannabe journalists seeking headlines, and those Microsoft bashers who blindly follow them.

And (2) those "poorly coded" Windows Updates are soon fixed and re-released by Microsoft.
Quote:
Again, my opinion, you're definitely entitled to yours. If at any point you see memory pages eating up, it's because of poorly coded or memory leaking applications, not because you need more RAM. You can google 100% memory usage or 99% memory usage, 9 times out of 10, you're going to end up with the same answer, memory leak not because they need more RAM. Unused RAM is wasted RAM
You are assuming and implying the OPs problem is due to memory leaks and poorly coded programs. And you are using obscure exceptions to support your assumptions. That's just wrong. High RAM usage can be caused by many things or combination of things not related to poorly coded programs.

So once again, please stop using remote exceptions to make a point. That is not sound logic, nor does it help the OP with his questions.

Quote:
and your point of it heating, is wrong, there is very low power draw on RAM barely 3W, so unless you overclock, with standard voltages, you can utilize RAM up to 90-95% and won't face any heating issues
I never said that. If you cannot quote me correctly, don't say I am wrong!

You can follow the link in my sig to see if I might know something about electronics and hardware. And you can see by the last line in my sig that I take heat seriously.

"Barely 3W" means nothing. To suggest a low power demand means something cannot over heat just demonstrates a lack of expertise in electronics, or heat management. :(

FTR, I said, "there is nothing that says RAM "should" be run at near capacity levels. Running at those levels does NOT make it more efficient. But it will make it run hotter most of the time which can increase aging if case cooling is lacking."

No where did I say "it will cause heating issues".
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Old 01-31-2018, 02:23 AM   #15
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Facts ? where ?

Quote:
RAM can and should be utilized up to 90-95% of capacity which is efficient usage, only if your requirement goes beyond that, should you think of upgrading the RAM. Under-utilization of RAM is actually a waste of resources.
I never once mentioned it degrades performance, now you're just misquoting me, Now where did I say "it degrades performance" ?

Truth comes out ??? LOL... It's common sense.. I said it's not required, not that it will not make a difference.. My point was 6 GB was enough, while you had recommended 8GB. You probably need to read the posts again.

The point of leaks was to the OP, to not jump in and increase RAM without proper investigation, and Yes, they can occur due to a myriad of issues not limited to leaks or poor code, but those are the major reasons.

Never said you recommended them, those were examples of poorly coded applications or memory leaks..

No, I don't have any whitepaper referencing it.

My apologies for misquoting you, on the heating..
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Old 01-31-2018, 07:16 AM   #16
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Quote:
I never once mentioned it degrades performance, now you're just misquoting me, Now where did I say "it degrades performance" ?
I did not misquote you. And now you are doing it again - we are going around in circles. No where did I say you said "it degrades performance". Please read what I said again.

I said your claim that RAM "should" run at 90 - 95% (a claim you now admit you cannot back up) "suggests" performance is degraded if you don't run your RAM at near capacity.

As I noted, there is nothing to "suggest" performance would be degraded or be less efficient. The only inefficiency, perhaps, would be with the budget.

Quote:
Never said you recommended them, those were examples of poorly coded applications or memory leaks.
I understand that. But if the examples don't apply to a poster's question or problem, they're irrelevant and just obfuscate the discussion. The facts remain, by far, most popular and reputable programs are not poorly coded, nor do they create memory leaks.
Quote:
My apologies for misquoting you, on the heating..
No problem.

Now I think there may be a little bit of a language barrier leading to some misunderstandings which have led to running this thread off-topic. So let's wait for the OP to come back and tells us where he stands.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Psychotron
and have used multiple methods like CCleaner, tinkering with autostart programs, services, msconfig, Revo Uninstaller, etc. But until now, everyone said that my specs were more than enough. I've likely messed with the Page File settings, but how do I get to them to reset them to default?
Unless you are a true expert at Windows optimization (and most people, contrary to their own beliefs, are not), it really is best to leave those settings alone and at their defaults.

Microsoft has been at this for a very long time. They have many top developers on staff and terabytes of empirical evidence and statistical data to work with to ensure Windows works optimally for "the normal user". And in this case, "the normal user" includes you, me, tristar and 99% of the remaining users out there who are in the middle of the user spectrum.

Contrary to what some people want to believe, their computer is not so unique that those settings need to be changed. Windows really does know how to use the installed resources effectively. So I urge you to reset your Page File as noted above to "Windows managed". Return MSConfig to the default settings. If MSConfig shows something is running you don't need running, use that program's preferences menu to change the setting, not MSConfig. As noted here, MSConfig is a "troubleshooting" tool. It is there to make temporary changes to see what happens. It is not for making permanent configuration changes.

If MSConfig is showing an unneeded program is starting with Windows, you don't use MSConfig to permanently stop it from leaving the gate. You use the program's configuration settings to stop it from even trying to run in the first place.

Windows does NOT need a 3rd party uninstaller program. Windows knows how to uninstall programs. And major apps like Norton and McAfee and others have specialized uninstallers available on their websites, if they are needed. As The How-To Geek notes,
Quote:
A third-party uninstaller is just another system tool that adds needless complexity to your life for questionable benefits.
In reality, third-party uninstaller tools are rarely necessary. Most people shouldn’t use them
@Psychotron - Sorry for the sidetracks. Please let us know if resetting the Windows defaults as mentioned and the new RAM sorts out your issues.
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Old 03-25-2018, 06:43 AM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Psychotron View Post
OK. I'm going to try getting two 4MB RAM and put them in there alone, then add the two 2GB later to see if there's a difference. Thanks for your help. Hopefully, I can put off getting that new computer. I'll try to come back and update if this works.
I'm pointing an update on my upgrades. I ended up having to bring my computer into the shop because the RAM I bought from Crucial (even after they scanned my computer) was not compatible. It caused my computer to not boot up all the way. The technician said that the RAM cards they sold me were too fast. So he had to order new ones.

He did install the SSD however, so I got a chance to see how that worked aside from the new RAM. He put my old C:\ into E:\ and now everything is fresh with my new C:\ drive. The SSD fixed just about all of my problems. Programs opened much faster and sometimes instantly (maybe that's because I don't have much installed though). The startup is much faster as well. It used to be 3 minutes, now it's less than a minute. One unintended benefit is that now Windows Update works (it stopped working long ago and help on all the forums and online never led to a fix).

Regarding the RAM, the ones he ordered were still too fast so he had to order even slower ones. He said that my motherboard was very picky. I finally got new RAM installed. He ordered two 4GB sticks instead of two 8GB (what I wanted). He also left in two of the old sticks, so now I have 12GB. I'm thinking about maybe taking the old ones out to see if there is a difference since I know some people have recommended against leaving them in.

I've posted another pic of my resource manager. It looks like I'm using a bit over 6GB, so I think it was still worth the upgrade. It's hard to say how much the upgraded RAM sticks help because I didn't get to try them separately like I did the SSD.
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Old 03-25-2018, 07:13 AM   #18
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Quote:
I'm pointing an update on my upgrades. I ended up having to bring my computer into the shop because the RAM I bought from Crucial (even after they scanned my computer) was not compatible. It caused my computer to not boot up all the way. The technician said that the RAM cards they sold me were too fast. So he had to order new ones.
The Crucial RAM wizard is normally very good at suggesting compatible RAM. While this is not unheard of, it is rare they suggested RAM that did not work. I hope they let you return them for a full refund.

Quote:
Regarding the RAM, the ones he ordered were still too fast so he had to order even slower ones. He said that my motherboard was very picky. I finally got new RAM installed. He ordered two 4GB sticks instead of two 8GB (what I wanted). He also left in two of the old sticks, so now I have 12GB. I'm thinking about maybe taking the old ones out to see if there is a difference since I know some people have recommended against leaving them in.
It is pointing more and more to a fault in your motherboard. If the motherboard was newer, I would suggest sending a note to HP in the hope they would look into it and maybe release an updated BIOS firmware fix. But I think being so old, they will see no incentive to expend the resources (time and money).

You can certainly take the old RAM out but understand, generally speaking, more RAM trumps faster RAM every time. So while your old RAM may be forcing all your RAM speeds to slow down a little, the fact Windows has more RAM to work in means it can do more work in the same amount of time.

Quote:
It's hard to say how much the upgraded RAM sticks help because I didn't get to try them separately like I did the SSD.
Yeah, that would difficult if you didn't get a baseline sample before the upgrades. That said, the SSD will only help with disc access issues (reads and writes). But at the same time (assuming you let Windows manage your Page File as you should), PF reads and writes will be MUCH faster with a SSD. But also at the same time, with more RAM, less critical data will be shuffled into and out of the PF. So you are not going to really tell which upgrade is helping where or the most.

So just look at as your upgrade package. ;)

What was your computer doing when you took that Resource Monitor screen shot? 99 - 100% CPU utilization is a concern too - if it lasted more than a second or two, unless you were running a stress test at the time.
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Old 03-25-2018, 08:43 AM   #19
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OK. Thank you. It was kind of a stress test. Several Chrome windows were open, including one with streaming video. I was also running a PowerPoint slideshow and Pandora. Basically, it represents the maximum resources I use on the computer rather than the normal use.
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Old 03-25-2018, 08:51 AM   #20
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Well streaming really uses very little CPU horsepower as it does not crunch numbers, it just passes it along to your graphics and sound processors. I am listening to Yes (I've Seen All Good People) via Pandorian (highly recommended, BTW, if you like Pandora) and only using .5% CPU and 25MB of RAM. PowerPoint may use a little more. Chrome is infamous for eating up resources that much was still a lot.
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