Go Back   Tech Support Forum > Hardware Support > RAM and Power Supply Support

User Tag List

Bad Power Supply?

This is a discussion on Bad Power Supply? within the RAM and Power Supply Support forums, part of the Tech Support Forum category. I have an Ultra 500w ATX power supply that I've got connected to a Chaintech ATX motherboard. The power supply


Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 11-13-2010, 05:52 AM   #1
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 15
OS: windows 7



I have an Ultra 500w ATX power supply that I've got connected to a Chaintech ATX motherboard.

The power supply has 20-pin (not 24-pin) and 4-pin power connectors.

When the 20-pin connector is plugged in only, I get power to the fans (CPU, Case and PSU), hard drive and DVD. When I also plug in the 4-pin connector, the CPU fan turns (sometimes) for a fraction of a second and then the system gets no power whatsoever, not even the PSU fans turn.

Bad Power Supply or bad Motherboard?

Any way to troubleshoot further before I go out and buy a power supply (the far easier one to replace) to test?

Also, if I get a new power supply, seems as if all have a 20+4-pin connector along with a separate 4-pin connector. Can I just get a 24-pin female to 20-pin male adapter to make it compatible with the newer ATX power supplies?
lexluthor5 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 11-13-2010, 06:41 AM   #2
Emeritus
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Illinois
Posts: 51,675
OS: XP Pro-7



Your problem points to the PSU. Chaintech PSU's are very poor quality so it should be replaced regardless.
No adapter is needed. Just use the 20 pin portion of the 20+4 pin PSU connector if your Mobo only uses 20 pin. SeaSonic & Corsair are top quality PSU's.



Tyree is offline  
Old 11-13-2010, 01:56 PM   #3
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 15
OS: windows 7



It's an Ultra PSU and a Chaintech motherboard and yes, it's a pretty old system, but it does what I need still.

Anyhow, I replaced the PSU, but the identical systems persist. With the 20-pin connector, all of the fans, including the fan on the PSU turns on. As soon as I plug in the 4-pin connector, everything goes completely off.

If it's a motherboard, why would the PSU fan go off?

It's not going to be worth replacing the motherboard, I don't think.

There's nothing I see physically wrong with the motherboard. No leaking/bulging capacitors.

Anything else I can try before I scrap this?

Should I repost in the motherboard support forum?
lexluthor5 is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 11-13-2010, 02:16 PM   #4
TSF Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: New Mexico
Posts: 3,959
OS: Win 7 Ultimate 64bit

My System


To try to isolate the problem before you throw in the towel Bench test the system...Basically setting it up outside the case...removing 1 component at a time.

How to Bench Test
shotgn is offline  
Old 11-13-2010, 02:32 PM   #5
Administrator
Team Manager, Gaming
Team Manager, Microsoft Support
Team Manager, Hardware Team
Microsoft MVP
 
Wrench97's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: S.E. Pennsylvania
Posts: 54,056
OS: Win7



The 4 pin powers the CPU without it plugged in all your starting are the fans, have tried clearing the CMOS yet?
Wrench97 is online now  
Old 11-13-2010, 02:45 PM   #6
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 15
OS: windows 7



Quote:
Originally Posted by shotgn View Post
To try to isolate the problem before you throw in the towel Bench test the system...Basically setting it up outside the case...removing 1 component at a time.

How to Bench Test
I guess I'll have to try something like that. All the cabling is unplugged though. I just connect the 20-pin to the motherboard and I get power. Then I connect the 4-pin to the motherboard and I get nothing at all. I'm not sure what more it would do to take the components out of the box, nothing really.

Quote:
Originally Posted by wrench97 View Post
The 4 pin powers the CPU without it plugged in all your starting are the fans, have tried clearing the CMOS yet?
I understand that, but why does ALL of the power go off as soon as I plug in the 4-pin? That's not making sense to me.

What's the best way to clear the CMOS? Just take out the battery for a few minutes or do I have to move a jumper and then provide power to the system?
lexluthor5 is offline  
Old 11-13-2010, 03:14 PM   #7
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 15
OS: windows 7



I removed the memory and all of the cards now as well. I think I found the cmos jumper. I put in on clear and then powered the pc on. Then put it back the way it was. Battery also still out.

No change.

I want to take out the CPU next, but I just can't figure out how to get the heat sink/fan off.

Here's a picture of that assembly.

I must be missing something else, but it doesn't look like it slides/pulls off at all. I can't even tell where the CPU is under there. I'm looking under and I still just see motherboard, but I can't see all the way under it really.

Any other ideas too?
Attached Thumbnails
Click image for larger version

Name:	2010-11-13_18-11-03_113.jpg
Views:	31
Size:	196.4 KB
ID:	81887  
lexluthor5 is offline  
Old 11-13-2010, 03:37 PM   #8
Administrator
Team Manager, Gaming
Team Manager, Microsoft Support
Team Manager, Hardware Team
Microsoft MVP
 
Wrench97's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: S.E. Pennsylvania
Posts: 54,056
OS: Win7



Never power on the PC with the jumper on clear, to clear the CMOS you unplug the power press and hold the power button several times to remove any residual power move the jumper to the clear position wait 10 seconds then move it back and replug the power.

Check the capacitors on the motherboard for any signs of domed tops loose cans or leakage> https://www.badcaps.net/pages.php?vid=5

The heat sink is probably stuck to the CPU because the thermal paste hardened, a gentle twisting motion, do not pry up or twist too hard or you may damage the CPU pins, I not sure why you're taking the CPU out?
Wrench97 is online now  
Old 11-13-2010, 03:53 PM   #9
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 15
OS: windows 7



I guess moving the jumper and taking out the battery cleared the CMOS by now.

I'll try a little more with the CPU/Heatsink. I'm out of ideas. Figured taking out the CPU and see what happens. Maybe that went bad.

I don't know anything else to try. It's basically going in the garbage at the moment, so I'm willing to try anything.

Please pass along any other ideas.

Thanks for the help so far.
lexluthor5 is offline  
Old 11-13-2010, 04:35 PM   #10
Administrator
Team Manager, Gaming
Team Manager, Microsoft Support
Team Manager, Hardware Team
Microsoft MVP
 
Wrench97's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: S.E. Pennsylvania
Posts: 54,056
OS: Win7



If the power supply was plugged in while the battery was out then it was not cleared the 5 vsb is hot when the supply is plugged in.

If you take the CPU out nothing will happen:)
Wrench97 is online now  
Old 11-14-2010, 04:54 AM   #11
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 15
OS: windows 7



Quote:
Originally Posted by wrench97 View Post
If the power supply was plugged in while the battery was out then it was not cleared the 5 vsb is hot when the supply is plugged in.

If you take the CPU out nothing will happen:)
No, at one point the power supply wasn't plugged in while cleared the jumper.

I'm not really sure how taking the CPU out would hurt? Couldn't it possibly help detect that a bad CPU is the problem?

At this point, my only conclusion could be the motherboard and I really have little desire to change out the motherboard here. It's just probably not worth it with such an old CPU/Hard Drive, etc.

Unless I can peg the problem on some other component, the system is done, so any other ideas?

And I still can't get the heat sink off. I released the tabs, but it's not budging at all. Even if the CPU was glued under in, it should come up if I lifted the heatsink assembly. It almost feels like I'm supposed to slide the heat sink or do something else do it to make it release, but I can't figure out what.
lexluthor5 is offline  
Old 11-14-2010, 05:13 AM   #12
Administrator
Team Manager, Gaming
Team Manager, Microsoft Support
Team Manager, Hardware Team
Microsoft MVP
 
Wrench97's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: S.E. Pennsylvania
Posts: 54,056
OS: Win7



The heat sink sits on top of the CPU the CPU is latched into the socket pulling both out together usually rips the pins out of the CPU rendering it useless.

Try heating the heat sink with a hair dryer, but you not going to be able to visually see anything by removing it.
Wrench97 is online now  
Old 11-14-2010, 05:21 AM   #13
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 15
OS: windows 7



I'll try that and yes, I know I won't see anything looking at the CPU, but if the CPU is out and I then I plug in both cables and it doesn't cut power fully, maybe that means a bad CPU?

Anything else worth trying or are you pretty sure it's a bad motherboard?
lexluthor5 is offline  
Old 11-14-2010, 05:26 AM   #14
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 15
OS: windows 7



I have an Ultra 500w ATX power supply that I've got connected to a Chaintech ATX motherboard.

The power supply has 20-pin and 4-pin power connectors. When the 20-pin connector is plugged in only, I get power to the fans (CPU, Case and PSU), hard drive and DVD. When I also plug in the 4-pin connector, the CPU fan turns (sometimes) for a fraction of a second and then the system gets no power whatsoever, not even the PSU fans turn.

I've replaced the power supply so far and the results were identical.

I've also detached all power supply cables from the system devices and removed all add-in cards. I've also cleared the CMOS.

There are no obvious capacitor problems on the motherboard.

Is it most likely just a bad motherboard at this point? With such old system components, I don't think I'd bother replacing the motherboard only. I'd probably just scrap the whole thing (other than the hard drive), so if anyone has any suggestions at all, I'm game.

Any other ideas or other things I can test?
lexluthor5 is offline  
Old 11-14-2010, 06:32 AM   #15
Emeritus
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Illinois
Posts: 51,675
OS: XP Pro-7



Pleases do not make multiple posts on the same subject.

https://www.techsupportforum.com/f210...ly-528322.html



Tyree is offline  
Old 11-14-2010, 06:58 AM   #16
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 15
OS: windows 7



Sorry, I didn't know if there were experts in different things that some people may not read both forums.

Since it's looking like it's a motherboard problem, I figured I'd get it over here too.

Maybe you can move the OP over to this forum and revise the topic name to indicated motherboard problem?
lexluthor5 is offline  
Old 11-14-2010, 07:07 AM   #17
TSF Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Croatia
Posts: 1,113
OS: Win7 Ultimate 64bit

My System

Send a message via Skype™ to Niram

Have you tried removing all ram and booting without it? You should hear 3 beeps in a loop
Niram is offline  
Old 11-14-2010, 07:13 AM   #18
Administrator
Team Manager, Gaming
Team Manager, Microsoft Support
Team Manager, Hardware Team
Microsoft MVP
 
Wrench97's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: S.E. Pennsylvania
Posts: 54,056
OS: Win7



No that won't tell you if the CPU is bad, the only why to test it is in a known good motherboard.
Wrench97 is online now  
Old 11-14-2010, 08:00 AM   #19
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 15
OS: windows 7



Quote:
Originally Posted by wrench97 View Post
No that won't tell you if the CPU is bad, the only why to test it is in a known good motherboard.
So if I take out the CPU and then plug in both power cables and then it doesn't short out the PSU, that's not telling you there's a good chance it's a bad CPU?

Also, I'm now pretty sure something is shorting out the PSU. Now, when I have both power cables in, the CPU fan starts for a second, then the last time I heard a click or something in the PSU and everything went off. Definitely sounds like some short protection is kicking in.

Any last ditch ideas?
lexluthor5 is offline  
Old 11-14-2010, 08:01 AM   #20
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 15
OS: windows 7



Quote:
Originally Posted by Niram View Post
Have you tried removing all ram and booting without it? You should hear 3 beeps in a loop
Yep, there's only the 2 power connectors and the CPU left in the case.

Also, I'm now pretty sure something is shorting out the PSU. Now, when I have both power cables in, the CPU fan starts for a second, then the last time I heard a click or something in the PSU and everything went off. Definitely sounds like some short protection is kicking in.

Any last ditch ideas?
lexluthor5 is offline  
Closed Thread

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is on
Smilies are on
[IMG] code is on
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Post a Question


» Site Navigation
 > FAQ
  > 10.0.0.2
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 04:24 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 2001 - 2018, Tech Support Forum

Windows 10 - Windows 7 - Windows XP - Windows Vista - Trojan Removal - Spyware Removal - Virus Removal - Networking - Security - Top Web Hosts