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Old 01-14-2009, 09:32 PM   #1
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I have a couple of dang old computers that I am working with and I have some sticks of ram that I got from other places I am wondering they are the simm type but some of my sticks say edo on it and some dont I vagly heard somewhere to not mix simm and edo is this true and if so how do I tell where to use what

are simm and edo the same slot type

thanks
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Old 01-15-2009, 12:43 AM   #2
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Start here > https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamic....28EDO.29_DRAM

It usually best to try to numbers off the sticks and google the numbers to find out what it is, There are sticks with no numbers that usually end up in the bottom of the maybe I'll find a use for it later bin.
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Old 01-15-2009, 01:57 AM   #3
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EDO is a type of RAM such as FPM, SDRAM, DDR, DDR2. SIMM come in 30pin/72pin and DIMMS come in 168pin/184pin/240pin depending on the technology. There is a size difference on them and you cannot just figure out where to plug them. You should google the part #'s to see what you ahve and then check with various sites to see where they are using these modules in. Memoryx.net is a good resource to check where they may go once you have narrowed down what you have.
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Old 01-15-2009, 08:39 PM   #4
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Im kinda lazy when it comes to old comptuters I just want to plug and leter rip is it ok if it fits in the slot with prexisting ram and works its good and if it doesnt work try a different ram will it hurt to just use trial and error

second Q I vagly heard somewhere something like dont mix edo ram with simm is this true(or something like that)

thanks
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Old 01-16-2009, 04:40 AM   #5
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Just try it. If it isn't ok it wont boot.
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Old 01-18-2009, 08:00 AM   #6
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the modules that you would have to worry about go back to the days of 486 .. that if I remember correctly was when they brought out EDO .. a motherboard that supported EDO would probably also work from non-EDO but not the other way around ..

After that it was SIMMS the forerunners to todays DIMM's and they came in with the changeover from 486's to Pentium I

here the problem came when they started to play around with the Voltage, dropping from 5V to 3,3V. Some Mobo's did it with automatically others required a jumper until 5V was unheard of again by which time most of it was done automatically. I remember losing a couple of good modules when I went to upgrade of my daughters PC using stuff put on one side "for emergencies" because I couldn't remember what Voltage the motherboard was working at .. by the time I realised it was 5V and I had placed a couple of 3,3V in it and powered on .. it was too late .. Dead RAM!!

Since then I read off the code on the board or chip, google, and figure out what is going on before making the same big mistake again.
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Old 01-18-2009, 03:38 PM   #7
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I am given tons of ram by people who dont want it so I dont mind ruining a few sticks I just dont like the idea of haveing to research every thing I want to make my life simple if it ruins my ram sticks oh well but another question can it ruin the motherboard by putting the wrong ram in say on any computer even up to modern comptuers

thanks
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Old 01-18-2009, 03:59 PM   #8
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The ram shouldn’t hurt a new motherboard, if the ram doesn't work the motherboard should beep a couple of times and the computer most likely won't start. If this does happen you shouldn’t leave the ram stick in. That could damage the motherboard. Just don’t go jamming the stick into the board, as you probably know, that will damage it!
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Old 01-19-2009, 05:37 AM   #9
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throw the edo out, its not worth it.
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Old 01-19-2009, 11:39 AM   #10
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I am quite the reverse .. I will sift through web-pages by the hour just to find out how something works .. and just pray I don't get too many confusing answers. I find this a great way to learn. The only downside is that I find myself finding information on a host of things that I am also interested in .. and tend to get sidetracked frequently .. but as a means to education it beats running down to the library searching through books and most likely not finding the one that I need.

research is a necessary evil .. as you'll find out when you really need to know something and no-one is around to point you in the right direction or give a helping hand. Also the more you use the tools on your PC the better equipped you will become to save time, just because you KNOW what you are doing.
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Old 01-20-2009, 03:07 PM   #11
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I am the same as you Done Fishin, I've spent hours trying to solve things, getting side tracked and learning. Thats how I found this forum!
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Old 01-23-2009, 01:44 PM   #12
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I appreciate the research thing but like a new motherboard(forget the edo thing now) like a duel core or something can I just put sticks of ram that fit in the slots and if it works it works can this hurt it if I stick like the wrong ram(but right slot) in or a peice of bad ram

thanks
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Old 01-24-2009, 01:28 AM   #13
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as far as I know, putting the wrong speed ram in NEW motherboards won't hurt if the module fits. They are all keyed so that you should find it extremely difficult (but NOT IMPOSSIBLE) to mount an incompatible memory. Having said that you may find that the specs are not compatible with the motherboard and as such it may power on but not do anything. Some Motherboards say that they only accept say 667 ~ 1066 Ram.

like this Asus P5QL-E board

https://www.asus.com/products.aspx?mo...11&l3=710&l4=0

Quote:
Memory

4 x DIMM, Max. 16 GB, DDR2 1066/800/667 Non-ECC,Un-buffered Memory
Dual Channel memory architecture
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Old 01-25-2009, 02:48 PM   #14
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try 1 stick at a time, if system boots then can use CPU-Z to get info. (freeware: latest version CPU-Z 1.49 https://www.cpuid.com/cpuz.php)
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Old 01-25-2009, 03:19 PM   #15
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I was looking for this thread to post this article by linderman

it's a tad out of date, but the info is on the nose, so should be pretty well in line with the questions and thinking behind this current thread

Quote:
Originally Posted by linderman View Post
Before you buy memory sticks we strongly advise you use a manufacturer that has a website memory configurator.


Gone are the days when you can slap in any old memory stick as long as the specs match! Several motherboard models wont accept sticks that have memory "chips" on both sides of the sticks, and as a result will refuse to boot!

If you read your motherboard manual; several of them have memory QVL lists (qulaified vendor lists) and charts that show where to install your memory (slot configurations) as well as designations of SS (single sided) or DS (double sided).
Memory slots are generally color coded, blue slots & black slots are commonly seen as are other colors. The color designation primarily designates a pair of slots which are on the same memory channel. This is crucial to understand, as "paired" memory matches must be on the same channel to achieve optimum performance, or system start-up.

These QVL lists are not inclusive of the only memory sticks that will work with your board, these QVL lists are often misinterpreted by users as meaning if you buy sticks made by memory manufacturers on the list; you will securing sticks that will work with your system, that is NOT necessarily correct. The memory makers will most likely have sticks of the same spec your board or system requires but will not function in YOUR system.
I strongly suggest you rely on a greater authority of which sticks will work with your board or system; the memory manufacturers themselves.

Most all the memory manufacturers will bend over backwards to ensure you are satisfied with your memory purchases from them, their memory selectors "guarantee" the models they suggest are tested and compatible with your board or mass manufacturered system (Dell, Compaq, Gateway etc) for premium performance.

By premium performance; I refer to dual channel operation when your board supports dual channel mode. Dual channel mode is VERY desirable to attain when possible. Dual channel can enhance total system performance by as much as 20%! The most common memory sold are dual channel memory kits; these kits are matched pairs of memory sticks, same model numbers, same individual on die chip maker! The small chips on the ram sticks are most often not produced by the ram stick manufacturer, but rather produced by another corporation, the ram stick maker then buys the chips in contract bulk sales.
This is where much of the problem comes in, just buying sticks that are selected by manufacturer & specification only (example = PC3200 x 512mb) will not ensure you get sticks that have individual chips made by the same supplier! The presence of mismatch chips often results in a pair of memory modules that will not boot or best case; wont perform in dual channel mode.

If you have existing memory installed in your system and wish to add more, I suggest several things prior to purchase.
If you have one stick installed and wish to add another stick, you will need to research the existing memory stick to see if that model is listed as compatible for your board, a stick can function in single channel mode but not in dual channel mode. The sticks listed in the memory configurators will be models that work in dual channel mode!

If you are very lucky and your existing ram module is listed as compatible by model number, then you may want to roll the dice and try to purchase one more stick of the exact model number in an attempt to make a dual channel kit. This is risky business & often does not work!

I personally prefer to cut my risks, sell off my existing memory on ebay and purchase a dual channel kit of modules of the size (512mb& 1gig) which are listed on the memory makers website for compatability. This approach will lessen the chance of your purchasing memory which will not perform as expected thus deepening your investment to attain your goal of performance enhancement!

When you choose a memory manufacturer's website configurator and input your system; the result will be a whole range of selections, memory bandwidth (PC 2100, 2700, 3200) = the higher the memory bandwidth the better the system will run, but more $$$$ also you will be given options for size of modules (512 & 1 gig etc.), CAS latency (the smaller the CAS number the faster the memory and the more expensive) Most all manufacturers will have high performance memory modules which are substantially more expensive, for those system owners that want the fastest possible and are willing to pay!
I will take the beating for the following statement "Only very serious gamers and overclockers will desire the high perfromance memory" the average user will see NO benefit when installing high performance memory sticks.

Another common choice users struggle with; the choice between buying 4 x 512 sticks or 2 x 1gig sticks. Niether choice has a "performance" improvement over the other. Each stick of ram uses about 10 watts of power so 4 sticks will use more power than two sticks. From an investment stand point, if one stick becomes defective you only lose one stick, not the vaule of the larger stick, but this point may be of less value as most ram is guaranteed for life.
In days previous we used to be able to buy 4 x 512 cheaper than 2 x 1 gig but I dont think that applies any more ?

Food for thought; The 32bit version of Win XP is for the most part maxed out using 2gigs of memory, even gaming. Dont buy more than you need!
Windows Vista however runs better at the starting points of 2 gigs and runs even better with more! There is no configuration to get 3 gigs to run in dual mode configuration, 2 gigs of ram in dual channel mode will run just as fast as 3 gigs in single channel mode, so; more is better is not always true.

If you are not a serious gamer, than one gig of memory "should" make your system run well for you. If you enjoy multi tasking and have a dual core processor, then you would be better served installing two gigs of memory.


Here is a partial listing of memory manufacturers that have memory selectors:


Crucial
https://www.crucial.com/



Corsair
https://www.corsairmemory.com/corsair...or_search.html


OCZ
https://configurator.ocztechnology.com/


Patriot
https://www.patriotmem.com/configurator/index.jsp


Mushkin
https://www.mushkin.com/


Samsung
https://www.memorystore.com/config_system.asp?cboMFG=101


These makers above are in no way intended to be exclusive for quality consideration; although our hardware staff have discussed experiences with these makers and we have all agreed these manufacturers will not disappoint you! The level of tech support is outstanding and the RMA process is a non-hassle experience.

If you have any questions; please post a new thread in the "RAM & PSU " hardware section, your questions will get an immediate response.
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Old 01-25-2009, 07:13 PM   #16
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I wouldn't use it. It's too old for what the new standards are, and it can end up frying the motherboard.
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Old 01-28-2009, 04:26 PM   #17
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Quote:
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I wouldn't use it. It's too old for what the new standards are, and it can end up frying the motherboard.
edgedev your saying that even though the ram stick fits in there (properly) that it could hurt the motherboard if it is somehow imcompatable

thanks
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Old 01-29-2009, 06:36 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nester9 View Post
edgedev your saying that even though the ram stick fits in there (properly) that it could hurt the motherboard if it is somehow imcompatable

thanks
Yes, I've seen cases where customers would go to a store, say that they need RAM, the sales associate gives them the wrong kind, because the computer that they may have is ancient, and they put it in (for some reason some old SDRAM have the same notches and groves as some of the DDR2 RAM presently, how that happened is beyond me), and then when they turn their computer on, they here a few beeps, and then nothing.

At first the problem seemed like a video, or power supply issue, but I later found out that they bought RAM that had nothing to do with the technology that they were dealing with.

I understand that we are talking about old technology with newer hardware, and my example is of new technology on old hardware, but it still carries the same principle that certain types of RAM are just not compatible with newer devices, no matter if they fit or don't fit.

Of course you can always take the chance, and if it works, then you made away with some RAM, but then you worry about durability and performance. Because RAM is based to run on certain amount of MHz in the cycling process, and especially with old SIMM memory, they are very fragile.

EDO and SIMM RAM is very different in functions. The last time that EDO RAM can run with SIMM was in computers that had about 60-80MHz. If it's THAT old, then sure, you can put in EDO RAM into a 72-Pin SIMM RAM spot, but other than that I don't recommend it.

-EDGE-
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Old 01-29-2009, 09:53 AM   #19
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The only thing that comes to mind with respects your statement are the memories I mentioned above where there were two types of RAM, one at 3,3V and the other at 5V

YOU CANNOT FIT DIFFERING STYLES OF RAM INTO ANY SOCKET APART FROM THAT PARTICULAR INSTANCE, AND THIS IS THE ONLY INSTANCE WHERE DAMAGE MIGHT OCCUR AS A RESULT!
These memories were the first memories that came out in DIMM style not DDR nor DDRII or even DDRIII.
placing old 72 pin EDO's into non EDO boards caused no damage .. simply they refused to work!
With the exception of the 5V and 3,3V working Voltage of DIMM's, the outward appearance and pinning was identical regardless f Voltage being used. The Motherboards initially had a jumper that required to be placed in the right position according to memory Voltage until autosensing on Motherboards took over. I suspect, but I am not sure, that certain unused pins were used to key the voltage selection so that the boards were protected from a case of overvoltage, something that I learnt about first hand with a SOYO motherboard that worked off of 5V and my 3,3V memory cards didn't take kindly to seeing the extra.

with the exception to 72 pin EDO / Non_EDO & the 100 pin 3,3V~5V DIMMs either the cards do not fit or will simply not work if placed on the wrong board.

If you are not sure about your memory type .. power off your PC, remove a card , look at the IC's and carefully google the number written on it. you'll get back a lot of info and sources about that type of memory by doing so. You will also be able to compare it with other memory types that aren't in your PC but you might like to try out.
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Old 01-29-2009, 04:54 PM   #20
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done fishing are you saying there is a possibility that if the peice of ram fits in there(properly) it could dammage the motherboard

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