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Updating rdram memory

This is a discussion on Updating rdram memory within the Motherboards, Bios|UEFI & CPU forums, part of the Tech Support Forum category. Possibly folks out there can help me in a "not too technical" way. I have acquired an HP 9870 Pavilion


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Old 12-18-2005, 02:37 PM   #1
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Possibly folks out there can help me in a "not too technical" way.

I have acquired an HP 9870 Pavilion from a friend. I am hoping to use this for Digital applications, Photography, Movies, hey and a couple of big processor/memory eating games. Have been searching information about upgrading the memory. Have found conflicting or confusing information regarding Rambus Memory for this machine and how much the motherboard will hold. Have found information stating it will take 2GB and other information only 1 GB (both from HP. go figure). Current installed memory Stick Info: PC600 RAmbus 64MB/4d nonECC, there are two. HP Documentations states these are 400MHz and the HP specs on the motherboard show the memory channels are 16/18bit, Dual Channel RDRAM.

Would like to run 800 Mhz or more if I can, but will the board support it. I do understand that the memory has to be added in pairs, but which pair...RIMMA1 and RIMMA2 for RIMMA1 and RIMMB3. Current Configuration: (RIMMA1 - 64MB) (RIMMA2 -CRIMM) (RIMMB1 - 64MB) (RIMMB2 - CRIMM) I know the CRIMM are dummies and just fill the socket and close the memory circuit. Does it matter where the CRIMMS ARE? If this is a dual channel?Which two consists of a channel. Would like to add 2 512MB Sticks and utilize the 64MB sticks as well if it's possible. Unlike SDRAM I know this works a little differently.

I would like to find used memory on Ebay to keep costs down....What should I look for that will work on my board. Had my eye on Some Infineon 512 Memory PC800-40 Sticks...Cheap...but could not find any documentation to support whether or not they would work.

I would have to probably update my bios to incorporate higher mhz. But in trying to get into Bios on this machine, I have tried all the usual keys while booting up..Del, F1 and F2..I understand that Phoenix uses F2...Hasn't worked.

Computer Specs:

Motherboard: Asus P4T Alcatraz (would have to open the machine to physically investigate the version number on the board)
Chipset: Intel i850LE 1300 MHz Pentium 4
Current RDRAM 128
Slots: 4 - 64MB in two of the slots.....in the other 2 slots
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Old 12-18-2005, 02:53 PM   #2
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Simple answer to part of your question.

This is how the RAM is setup now
Slot 1: 64mb
Slot 2: Continuity RIMM
Slot 3: 64mb
Slot 4: Continuity RIMM

If you buy any more RAM, you'll wan't to move the 64mb RAM pieces together, so that they'll be:

Slot 1: 64mb
Slot 2: 64mb
Slot 3: New RAM or Continuity RIMM
Slot 4: New RAM or Continuity RIMM

Keep the things in pairs when you start upgrading, so that if you buy 2 512mb sticks, then you would want the 2 512 sticks together, and the 2 64 sticks together.

As for your board RAM limits, and if it can support PC800 RDRAM, I will look into that and get back to you, but it will help greatly to know the exact board specs. One way to try and find this out is to use AIDA 32, a free program which will list your system specs. Download it, unzip it, and run it and it will tell you what your Motherboard is in detail, post back with the Motherboard ID and the Motherboard Name.

--Whitestar90
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Old 12-18-2005, 03:27 PM   #3
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Thank you for answering...helps a lot

Does it matter with this type of memory if the larger memory (say 256MB) is first followed by the smaller memory??? I believe this is correct for SDRAM?
Or am I just getting confused with the multitude of information I've been sifting through??? Or in this case just doesn't matter.

Example:

Slot 1: 256MB
Slot 2: 256MB
Slot 3: 64MB
Slot 4: 64MB
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Old 12-20-2005, 11:16 PM   #4
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Sorry it took so long to get back to you, I forgot to set this thread on subscription, so I lost it.

I honestly don't think it matters with RDRAM which order it comes in, so long as they are paired.

I honestly haven't managed to look into this yet, sorry for that, if you could post back with the info I asked for in my first reply in this thread, it would help me out a lot.

--Whitestar90
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Old 12-21-2005, 12:42 AM   #5
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Also, to the other part of your post. You say you wish to use a lot of processor intensive stuff on this, such as games. It will most likely not be worth the hassle of upgrading this system for such tasks. I should know, I'm running a similar system to you, an old Socket 423 p4 1.5ghz system with only 256mb RDRAM.

The hassle of trying to upgrade this system is more than it's worth, especially for the prices. A far simpler thing, in my opinion, would be to use the case, power supply, video card (if it's a good one) Hard Drives, and other internal components, and upgrade the three main things. (Motherboard, CPU, RAM)

Such an upgrade wouldn't cost that much. If you want 64bit support for the new Windows version coming out soon, then it'd be a bit more, but I garantee you will find it a powerhorse compared to the system you would be upgrading, as well as having much room for further upgrades over the months and years you'd have it.

If you want to go for the 64bit support, this setup would be ideal for the penny-pincher:

$55 Dollar Socket 775 Motherboard
$81 Dollar 2.53ghz Celeron Processor with 64bit Support
$81 1gb (2x512mb) DDR-400 RAM
Total: $216 Dollars ($224 with cost of shipping included)

You could go even cheaper, if you didn't go with 64bit support, but at this point in time, I find it a bit pointless to upgrade if you're not going for a 64bit processor.

$23 Dollar Socket 478 Motherboard
$72 Dollar 2.53ghz Celeron without 64bit Support
$81 RAM (same as above)
Total: $176 Dollars ($187 with cost of shipping)

If you went for the 64bit one, then, as I said, it could be upgraded even further over time, as soon socket 775 processors are going to be coming down in price by quite a bit, which means you could go for a 3.0 or 3.2ghz P4 for around $100-120 Dollars, within the next year, as well as getting a high-end video card for the games and graphics programs, and still having plenty of room to upgrade after that.

I know this might not be what you were wanting to hear from here, but I thought I should put it out there, considering what you're wanting from the upgrades you're asking about. It is my honest opinion that anyone using a 423 pin P4 and/or has a computer using over-expensive RDRAM, should be upgrading about now if they want anything serious from their computers.

--Whitestar90
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