Go Back   Tech Support Forum > Hardware Support > Motherboards, Bios|UEFI & CPU

User Tag List

PC died, can't tell which part

This is a discussion on PC died, can't tell which part within the Motherboards, Bios|UEFI & CPU forums, part of the Tech Support Forum category. I've had this machine for just under 3 years. Today during normal operation it froze up on me. The first


Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 08-07-2012, 09:12 AM   #1
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 9
OS: Windows 7 Pro 64-bit



I've had this machine for just under 3 years. Today during normal operation it froze up on me. The first few times I restarted I got picture and the computer appeared to be fine before freezing again. Now restarting always fails to boot and leads to two different beep codes, one indicating gpu issues and the other a power error. All the lights and fans are functional including the fan on the gpu.

My guess would be that either the power supply or the motherboard needs replacement, but I have no idea which and would like a second opinion before I start buying things.

Specs:
Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-EP45-UD3L
Power supply: 650watt Antec EarthWatts EA650
CPU: Intel Core 2 Quad Q9400
GPU: Nividia GTX 460
RAM: 8GB (2GBx4) PC6400 DDR2 800Mhz
FunkyFritter is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 08-07-2012, 09:19 AM   #2
Emeritus
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Illinois
Posts: 51,675
OS: XP Pro-7



3 yrs. is the warranty period on that PSU and it wasn't the best quality to begin with so that would be a good place to start.
If the PSU neds to be replaced, all SeaSonic- All XFX- Most Corsair (not the CX-GS-M Series) are top quality.
Do you have or can you borrow a known good PSU to try?
Try your GPU in another PC or try another GPU in your PC.



Tyree is offline  
Old 08-07-2012, 09:26 AM   #3
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 9
OS: Windows 7 Pro 64-bit



Unfortunately I have neither replacements parts or another computer on hand to test things with.
FunkyFritter is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 08-07-2012, 12:51 PM   #4
MPR
TSF Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 5,232
OS: Win 8.1



Without another system with which to test your PC's components, about the only things you can do are:
  • Dust the entire system using canned "air" or a low-pressure blower.
  • Make sure that nothing like a loose screw or an overly long solder tail is shorting out something.
  • Look carefully at the wiring, circuit traces and surface mount components for any signs of burning or solder cracking.
  • Unplug, examine and replug all the power connections to make sure they are secure and that a wire connection is not lose or a pin broken or melted.
  • Unseat the RAM sticks, videocard and other expansion cards, examine and blow out of the slots, then re-seat the sticks and cards.
  • Make sure that all fans, especially the CPU fan, are working and that nothing is preventing them from spinning.

After this, power is the first thing to check. If you try to run your system with a failing power supply in order to perform other tests you stand a good chance of damaging all of your hardware. As Tyree implied, the easiest way to test for PSU issues would be to try to power your system with a known good PSU. Even basic testing of a PSU requires a decent multimeter and the knowledge of how to fabricate a dummy load.
MPR is offline  
Old 08-07-2012, 01:15 PM   #5
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 9
OS: Windows 7 Pro 64-bit



I was able to borrow a functional psu and installed that, including new power cables. The first time I booted it up it seemed to be working, then froze after about a minute. Now booting always results in the beep code for a power error.

There are no burns or other obvious signs of damage on anything. Everything seems to be plugged in properly and all the fans are still running. At this point short of replacing the motherboard I'm out of ideas.
FunkyFritter is offline  
Old 08-07-2012, 01:37 PM   #6
Emeritus
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Illinois
Posts: 51,675
OS: XP Pro-7



Brand & Model of the substitute PSU?



Tyree is offline  
Old 08-07-2012, 01:44 PM   #7
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 9
OS: Windows 7 Pro 64-bit



SeaSonic X-660
FunkyFritter is offline  
Old 08-07-2012, 03:08 PM   #8
MPR
TSF Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 5,232
OS: Win 8.1



Are you getting continuous long or short beeps? Short beeps should be pretty short; if you can't tell, have you tried re-seating your graphics card?
1 short: System boots successfully
1 long, 3 short: Keyboard error
2 short: CMOS setting error
1 long, 9 short: BIOS ROM error
1 long, 1 short: Memory or motherboard error
Continuous long beeps: Graphics card not inserted properly
1 long, 2 short: Monitor or graphics card error
Continuous short beeps: Power error
Also, did you remember to plug in the 4-pin ATX power connector that's above the CPU? How does its and the 24-pin main power socket look, any signs of damage?

A "power error" could mean a power supply problem at any of your components. Try disconnecting everything but the CPU fan, ATX and 24-pin power to the motherboard and the PCIe power to your video card and see if you can get to a stable BIOS screen. If you can't, try removing the video card and see if you the beep code changes. Do you have another video card you could borrow for a test or another system on which to test your video card?

Also, try removing all of your RAM and then replacing a single stick nearest to the CPU. If the error recurs try a different stick, then the slot one slot over (which is the other channel).
MPR is offline  
Old 08-07-2012, 06:02 PM   #9
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 9
OS: Windows 7 Pro 64-bit



I took the whole thing apart and reconnected everything, it seems to have worked. My psu was dead and one of the connections must have been loose when I tried out the newer one. Thank you both for all your help.
FunkyFritter is offline  
Old 08-07-2012, 06:26 PM   #10
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 9
OS: Windows 7 Pro 64-bit



...and shortly after I say that it crashes again, although this time it reboots properly after a few tries. I left it idle for around 20 minutes without issue and it crashed after only a few minutes of use, could heat cause something like this?
FunkyFritter is offline  
Old 08-07-2012, 06:50 PM   #11
Emeritus
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Illinois
Posts: 51,675
OS: XP Pro-7



It is a possibility the PSU did some damage to other components. Try removing all RAM, boot, listed for beep codes. No RAM and no beep codes indicates a Mobo problem.



Tyree is offline  
Old 08-07-2012, 07:24 PM   #12
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 9
OS: Windows 7 Pro 64-bit



Removing the ram gave me a beep code, but it was the series of long beeps (graphics card not inserted properly) instead of the expected one. At this point the computer boots fully and appears to be operational, but consistently crashes after a few minutes of heavy load.
FunkyFritter is offline  
Old 08-07-2012, 08:38 PM   #13
MPR
TSF Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 5,232
OS: Win 8.1



If you can get the system to boot now and operate for a while, record the voltages shown in the BIOS, then when in Windows with Hardware Monitor.

If you have a multimeter you can also check the voltages directly at the back of the 24-pin and 4-pin ATX power connectors for an exact reading. Ground the negative end of the probe on the black wire and check the colored wires (except for green) with the positive probe. Voltages should be according to the pin-out in the power supply section of this article.

If anything reads outside the tolerances given in the article I linked could you let us know?
MPR is offline  
Old 08-08-2012, 05:25 AM   #14
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 9
OS: Windows 7 Pro 64-bit



All of the voltage readings seem to be within the tolerance ranges, although none of the 12 volt values show up in Hardware Monitor. I used SpeedFan to check voltages as well and it gave me more values, but all the extra readings were way off.

This morning the computer turned on fine and haven't had any problems after roughly an hour of use. I haven't changed anything since the last crash, so I have no idea what to make of that.

Since I have little experience dealing with voltages and circuits I've included the raw data I collected below:

Code:
BIOS READINGS

under "MB Intelligent Tweaker"
cpu vcore         1.2875v
cpu termination   1.2v
cpu PLL           1.55v
cpu reference     0.805v

MCH core          1.1v
MCH reference     0.76v
ICH I/O           1.55v
ICH core          1.1v

under "PC Health Status"
vcore             1.268v
DDR18V            1.888v
+3.3v             3.344v
+12v              12.302v
FunkyFritter is offline  
Old 08-08-2012, 02:23 PM   #15
MPR
TSF Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 5,232
OS: Win 8.1



Your BIOS showed 12 V within specs but Hardware Monitor didn't even show a 12 V reading for your motherboard and Speedfan read the 12 V at 1.73 V.

Speedfan and, sometimes, HW Monitor can give false readings. Does HWiNFO32 also show no 12V reading (just run the sensors)?

If you still are getting no motherboard 12 V reading you probably have a bad sensor. If you are getting a low reading it would be very interesting to see what the actual voltage between the black (ground) and yellow (+12 V) wires was at the backs of your ATX 4-pin and 24-pin power connectors. A multimeter can be purchased at hardware and department stores for less than $15.

At this time it might be a good idea to do a Bench Test, both to ensure there is nothing shorting out anything and also so that you can examine the back of the motherboard for signs of damage.
MPR is offline  
Old 08-08-2012, 02:52 PM   #16
MPR
TSF Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 5,232
OS: Win 8.1



Intermittent power problems with a computer system can oftentimes be traced back to a failing power supply, a loose or grounding power connection, or a loose screw or standoff, etc. that's been bouncing around and grounding or shorting out things. Sometimes cracked solder joints can open and close with changes in temperature or long solder tails get bent over and connect with the case or other components and give you problems too.

Look for any of the above (you can sometimes hear a sliding screw if you gently turn over your powered-off and unplugged computer). Also, make sure that the exposed ends of unused power connectors are not touching each other or anything else metallic inside the case. I sometimes tack a short piece of electrical tape over any unused power connectors, especially if I need to stuff extra cables out of the way.
MPR is offline  
Old 08-08-2012, 02:55 PM   #17
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Aug 2012
Posts: 9
OS: Windows 7 Pro 64-bit



HWiNFO32 seems to have no trouble reading any of the voltages and reports around 12.3v for the 12+ connection, which matches the BIOS reading. I've left the computer running all day without incident and successfully restarted a few times, which leaves me perplexed but hopeful.

At this point I'm mostly just trying to figure out what happened and if it's going to happen again. One moment it was failing to boot and the next it seems fine. The only variable I can think of is the weather. Yesterday was very hot and humid compared to today, could that potentially cause a short? If anyone has any other ideas of potential causes or can shed any light on the situation I would be grateful, otherwise at this point I don't think there's much left I can do unless it happens again.

Edit: I've checked for loose cable ends or screws throughout this process. Nothing I can see is physically wrong with any of the components.
FunkyFritter is offline  
Old 08-08-2012, 03:08 PM   #18
MPR
TSF Enthusiast
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 5,232
OS: Win 8.1



You may not have seen the info I just added to my last post but things expand and contract with heating and cooling and sometimes a cracked solder joint or circuit trace, or even a mechanical circuit connection, can open and close with changes in temperature.

Also, as I previously said, you may have had a power connector or a loose metallic object that was grounding or short-circuiting something and which got moved when you started working with your computer.

You might have a failing PSU that has decided to render a "last gasp" of adequate power too.

The final think I can think of would be to look for "popped," swollen or leaky capacitors (those things that look like little trash cans), though modern motherboards have this problem less frequently due to the better types of capacitors now being used.

If the problem recurs I'd do the Bench test as linked above and carefully examine the motherboard for damage and the case for any loose bits of metal.
MPR is offline  
Closed Thread

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
HP dv6338se died
my laptop died few weeks ago.:neutral: first i found the problem when I left it overnight on hibernate, the next night when turn power on, all LEDs on, no video, no beep, the LED next to sd card slot stay solid, what ever I do to it no response. The night after 48 hours passed, it somehow turned...
citrix Laptop Support 4 12-24-2011 08:49 AM
Computer suddenly died and won't boot! PSU or motherboard?
Background: I built my first custom PC in July 2011. Before this I had only replaced parts in store-bought desktop computers. I bought all my parts from NewEgg and Amazon. Everything is still under warranty from the manufacturers. It has been a great computer with no issues since July 2011, so a...
dragonfruit8 Motherboards, Bios|UEFI & CPU 12 11-13-2011 05:20 AM
Comparing Two Excel sheets and highlighting differences PART 2
Hello again, I sure would like to thank Glaswegian for the code for my excel sheet! I modified it and here’s what it looks like: Sub FindDuplicates2() 'matches against 2 cols Dim rng1 As Range Dim rng2 As Range Dim bMatch As Boolean Dim origRng As Range Dim compRng As Range
jonathynblythe Microsoft Office support 17 04-26-2011 05:52 AM

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is on
Smilies are on
[IMG] code is on
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Post a Question


» Site Navigation
 > FAQ
  > 10.0.0.2
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 07:32 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 2001 - 2018, Tech Support Forum

Windows 10 - Windows 7 - Windows XP - Windows Vista - Trojan Removal - Spyware Removal - Virus Removal - Networking - Security - Top Web Hosts