Go Back   Tech Support Forum > Hardware Support > Motherboards, Bios & CPU

User Tag List

Does the Cpu Matter that Much?

This is a discussion on Does the Cpu Matter that Much? within the Motherboards, Bios & CPU forums, part of the Tech Support Forum category. Off and on over the years I have read that ram is the most important change to increase system speed


Like Tree2Likes
  • 2 Post By SelfGovern
Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 10-20-2019, 08:30 AM   #1
Team Manager - Hardware
Acting Manager, Security Center
 
Rich-M's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: NE Pennsylvania
Posts: 14,467
OS: Windows 10 Professional

My System


Off and on over the years I have read that ram is the most important change to increase system speed followed later by ssd drive vying for the biggest single change in speed. Mhz matters then it doesn't etc..... but I just saw an incredible change in performance I can't pin on anything else but cpu so let me explain, maybe someone else can?.

A laptop for me is of secondary importance as most of my work is done on 2 desktops at home. I have always had a laptop but mostly for use in a client homes or offices for various reasons and have always disliked whatever laptop I owned because sooner or later they all seem sluggish in comparison. My last laptop was an HP ProBook 450 G4. I originally changed the hard drive to an ssd Samsung 850 Evo drive when I bought it. I then increased ram from 8 to 16 Gb. It came with an i7 7500U cpu 2.75 Ghz -3.5 GHZ. I install my own Windows 10 so there is no bloatware from HP on there I should add just Windows and programs. And somehow this laptop like all my past ones had great graphics with this one having Intel HD graphics and discreet Nvidia 930MX on Windows 10 Pro as well yet it just seemed sluggish to me over the 2 years I had it. I tried upping ram to 32 gb which made little or no difference and then one day sold it to a fussy client in my shop so I could try again.

After shopping forever and trying other models in stores I wound up buying almost the same thing again with an HP ProBook 450 G5 i7 8550U Cpu 1.8 GHZ-4.0 which came with a M2.280 I upgraded to an HP 500 Gb M2.280 from a 256 M2.280 drive with 16 Gb Ddr4 2666 ram (same I had in the other model) and no other changes. The only difference I see is the 7500U cpu vs the 8550U is true 4 core cpu with 8 meg cache over the 7500 4 meg cache and dual core cpu and the difference is "night and day". This laptop is by far the best laptop I have ever put my hands on in every way and almost the equal of my two desktops both of which have 16 gb ram, M2.280 ssd drives and i7 8700K and i7 9700K cpus. The only difference between the two I can find is cpu and type of ssd drive. Any thoughts?
__________________


All PC's are not the same. Posting your PC specs will help us to assist you quicker and more effectively.
Rich-M is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 10-20-2019, 08:37 AM   #2
Team Manager
Microsoft Support
 
Corday's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Midlands of South Carolina
Posts: 26,018
OS: Windows10. In the past CP/M, DOS, Windows 95, 2000, 98SE, ME, Vista & Windows 7

My System


While we're speculating, my bet (no $$$$ on it) would be the number of cores. I've noticed huge difference when multi-tasking or downloading from multiple sites simultaneously.
__________________

The stability of an OS is in direct proportion to the stability of the user.
Corday is offline  
Old 10-20-2019, 08:39 AM   #3
Team Manager - Hardware
Acting Manager, Security Center
 
Rich-M's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: NE Pennsylvania
Posts: 14,467
OS: Windows 10 Professional

My System


Well good point but it still points to Cpu change if right!
__________________


All PC's are not the same. Posting your PC specs will help us to assist you quicker and more effectively.
Rich-M is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 10-20-2019, 08:41 AM   #4
Team Manager
Microsoft Support
 
Corday's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: Midlands of South Carolina
Posts: 26,018
OS: Windows10. In the past CP/M, DOS, Windows 95, 2000, 98SE, ME, Vista & Windows 7

My System


Quote:
Originally Posted by Rich-M View Post
Well good point but it still points to Cpu change if right!
Si, Senor.
__________________

The stability of an OS is in direct proportion to the stability of the user.
Corday is offline  
Old 10-20-2019, 01:15 PM   #5
TSF Moderator
Hardware Team
 
bassfisher6522's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 2,322
OS: Windows 10 Pro



FYI.....since you use Samsung SSD's, do you use "Rapid Mode"? You go from 540 read/write speeds to 3400 read/write speeds. A big system performance gain/boost.
__________________
bassfisher6522 is offline  
Old 10-20-2019, 01:26 PM   #6
Team Manager - Hardware
Acting Manager, Security Center
 
Rich-M's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: NE Pennsylvania
Posts: 14,467
OS: Windows 10 Professional

My System


Yes I did on the first one where I used a Samsung and forgot to mention that on the current one I am using an HP M2.280 Ssd drive though.
__________________


All PC's are not the same. Posting your PC specs will help us to assist you quicker and more effectively.
Rich-M is offline  
Old 10-20-2019, 02:25 PM   #7
Hardware Tech Team
 
Join Date: Mar 2019
Location: Maryland, USA
Posts: 214
OS:

My System


The right or good CPU does make all the difference on a laptop in my own experience, coupled with at least 8GB of memory.
SpareChange is offline  
Old 10-21-2019, 06:11 AM   #8
Team Manager - Networking
Moderator - Hardware
 
JimE's Avatar
 
Join Date: Apr 2009
Location: St Louis, MO
Posts: 19,813
OS: Win 7 SP1

My System


All else being equal, of course a cpu upgrade will make a noticeable difference in performance. Also, as has always been the case, even a newer generation cpu of equal or lower speed can actually perform faster than it's older brother. This is because the entire motherboard chipset has generally also been upgraded.

As for RAM, it depends on how it's used. Once you have 8GB, you aren't likely to notice any increase in performance by upgrading for basic office apps. If the machine is used in such a way that the apps actually need and can use more RAM, then that will make a difference. But for normal daily activities (ie: Office, email, web browsing), you don't need a lot of RAM.

HDD speed is fairly obvious.
__________________
Jim

JimE is offline  
Old 10-21-2019, 07:27 AM   #9
Team Manager - Hardware
Acting Manager, Security Center
 
Rich-M's Avatar
 
Join Date: May 2007
Location: NE Pennsylvania
Posts: 14,467
OS: Windows 10 Professional

My System


Most of the time you are absolutely right Jim but there were exceptions. I had a system with an i7 4790K cpu that lasted as a top cpu well up until generation 8 in performance and even the Gen 3 3570K was also a top notch cpu that remained ahead of most for quite a few series of cpus but those and a few others are exceptions to the rule. The 8550U cpu had double the cache as well as double the cores of the 7500U and I had faith it would have better performance. While it started out at 1.8 Ghz I had also noticed it went up to 4.0 while the 7500U started at 2.7 but only went to 3.5 GHZ, But in spite of knowing that I didn't expect such an extreme difference in the 2 laptops.
__________________


All PC's are not the same. Posting your PC specs will help us to assist you quicker and more effectively.
Rich-M is offline  
Old 10-22-2019, 06:03 PM   #10
Registered Member
 
djbillyd's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Crimson Tide Country, Anniston, AL
Posts: 53
OS: Windows 10 Insider Preview Eval



Quote:
Originally Posted by Corday View Post
While we're speculating, my bet (no $$$$ on it) would be the number of cores. I've noticed huge difference when multi-tasking or downloading from multiple sites simultaneously.
Definitely the number of cores.
djbillyd is offline  
Old 10-22-2019, 10:05 PM   #11
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2006
Posts: 1
OS: WinXP x64



Every system has a bottleneck -- the thing that limits performance. It may be disk, processor, RAM, graphics card, etc. It may sometimes be the person in front of the keyboard, if he cannot work faster than the data is coming to him. When you fix one bottleneck, there is a new component that becomes the bottleneck.

Nobody knows what your bottleneck is until they've looked at the system performance metrics (perfmon, etc.) to see which subsystem is holding up the others.

The harder question is, will the cost of fixing the current bottleneck be cost effective? That is, will it yield enough of a performance boost to justify its cost?
djbillyd and Rich-M like this.
SelfGovern is offline  
Closed Thread

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is on
Smilies are on
[IMG] code is on
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Post a Question


» Site Navigation
 > FAQ
  > 10.0.0.2
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 09:34 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 2001 - 2018, Tech Support Forum

Windows 10 - Windows 7 - Windows XP - Windows Vista - Trojan Removal - Spyware Removal - Virus Removal - Networking - Security - Top Web Hosts