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Cannot set AHCI mode when using RAID on ASUS mbo

This is a discussion on Cannot set AHCI mode when using RAID on ASUS mbo within the Motherboards, Bios & CPU forums, part of the Tech Support Forum category. I have an old (but most important) ASUS M4A785TD-M EVO motherboard on which I long since installed an OCZ Vertex


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Old 03-02-2019, 03:37 AM   #1
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I have an old (but most important) ASUS M4A785TD-M EVO motherboard on which I long since installed an OCZ Vertex 4 SSD. I just checked its performance with the AS SSD benchmarking tool. This showed a 'PCIIDE - BAD' warning. I understand this is because the SSD is not being supported in AHCI mode. When I check in the BIOS, the mode for this SATA connection is set to IDE and it's not immediately obvious how I can set it to AHCI. Let me explain:

This mobo has 5 SATA 3 ports labelled 1 to 6 in the BIOS (port 4 is not physically on the board). I can set the mode for SATA ports 5 & 6 separately to ports 1 to 4. I have set SATA mode for ports 1 to 4 to RAID because I have a RAID 1 array on ports 2 and 3 (port 1 is an optical drive).

With ports 1 to 4 set to SATA mode RAID the BIOS allows only the choice of RAID or IDE for the setting of SATA mode for ports 5 and 6. Port 6 is a SATA HDD; port 5 is my OCZ Vertex 4 SSD. RAID did not seem appropriate here so I chose IDE - and hence the warning from the AS benchmarking app.

The only way I can set ports 5 and 6 to AHCI is to chose the option AHCI in the setting of ports 1 to 4 - but if I do that then I loose my RAID configuration - don't I? Is there some way round this Catch-22, so that I can have a RAID 1 array as well as AHCI for my SSD?
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Old 03-02-2019, 09:03 AM   #2
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How about you set SATA mode to RAID for the ports, but don't add the SSD and HDD to any array, instead, set them up as JBOD so that they appear and operate as individual disks. On some systems, there are only two SATA modes available to choose from; IDE or RAID. My household Optiplex is one of them and it has a couple of SATA disks inside that were never configured for any array. They operate as the independent disks that they are. I'm not sure if your system will allow setting the two drives as JBOD without formatting them, so before you attempt this, make sure you have a backup of their contents. Make sure you have a system image backup as well so that you could always restore when needed.

Update:
As a matter of fact, just set the mode to RAID and leave them as they are. Don't even launch the RAID setup utility or set them as JBOD. The SSD and HDD should continue working as is. Of course, you need to make the necessary changes to the Windows registry prior to changing from IDE to RAID or else it won't boot.
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Old 03-02-2019, 10:21 AM   #3
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Originally Posted by Stancestans View Post
Of course, you need to make the necessary changes to the Windows registry prior to changing from IDE to RAID or else it won't boot.
What necessary changes?
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Old 03-02-2019, 10:36 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by XEyedBear View Post
What necessary changes?
See https://www.askvg.com/how-to-change-...lling-windows/

I'm assuming the SSD has the operating system (Windows). If so, you need to tell Windows to load the RAID drivers at startup, otherwise the OS drive will not be accessible and Windows won't load.
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Old 03-03-2019, 02:11 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by Stancestans View Post
See https://www.askvg.com/how-to-change-...lling-windows/

I'm assuming the SSD has the operating system (Windows). If so, you need to tell Windows to load the RAID drivers at startup, otherwise the OS drive will not be accessible and Windows won't load.
I had no understanding that these step were required to avoid a BSOD - even though you hinted at it in your first reply. I think I would just have stumbled into the problem described in the article you have referred me to.

However, even though that article is easy to follow, step 6 (select AHCI or RAID in BIOS, as required), raises again one of my original concerns: If I select SATA mode AHCI (having done the necessary registry edits) won't I lose RAID support on SATA ports 2 and 3 ?

(And , yes, Win 10 is installed on the SSD connected on port 5.)
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Old 03-03-2019, 07:12 PM   #6
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I'm not familiar with that board. But from past experience, you either actually run RAID using ALL of the ports, or you use each port for individual drives. In other words, if you want the drive on port 1 to run on it's own, you won't later be able to use ports 2 & 3 to RAID a pair of drives (using the chipset controller). But there are other ways to create RAID arrays without using the motherboard chipset (which on most models is low end anyway).
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Old 03-03-2019, 09:12 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XEyedBear View Post
I had no understanding that these step were required to avoid a BSOD - even though you hinted at it in your first reply. I think I would just have stumbled into the problem described in the article you have referred me to.

However, even though that article is easy to follow, step 6 (select AHCI or RAID in BIOS, as required), raises again one of my original concerns: If I select SATA mode AHCI (having done the necessary registry edits) won't I lose RAID support on SATA ports 2 and 3 ?

(And , yes, Win 10 is installed on the SSD connected on port 5.)
Quote:
Originally Posted by JimE View Post
I'm not familiar with that board. But from past experience, you either actually run RAID using ALL of the ports, or you use each port for individual drives. In other words, if you want the drive on port 1 to run on it's own, you won't later be able to use ports 2 & 3 to RAID a pair of drives (using the chipset controller). But there are other ways to create RAID arrays without using the motherboard chipset (which on most models is low end anyway).
I too find it odd that you can set SATA Operation mode for ports 1-4 differently from ports 5&6. Usually the selected mode affects all ports collectively, unless there are more than one storage controllers on the motherboard. For example, ports 1-4 could be attached to an Intel controller while ports 5&6 could be attached to a Marvell storage controller. This could be the case with your board (I haven't yet checked its specs).

Leave the SATA Operation mode for ports 1-4 as it is (RAID) and set the mode for ports 5&6 to RAID, but don't run the RAID configuration utility to add the HDD and SSD to any RAID configuration. They should be accessible just fine with their data intact as long as Windows loads the raid controller's driver for them. This will get you better performance than the IDE mode they're currently using.

As for ports 1-4, changing the mode to AHCI from RAID will render the RAID 1 volume inaccessible although the volume should remain unaffected such that setting it back to RAID should restore accessibility to the volume. In other words, you will lose access to the RAID 1 volume if you change to AHCI.

To sum it up, if you want to keep the RAID 1 configuration, leave the mode in RAID as it is for ports 1-4. If you want better performance for the drives attached to ports 5 & 6, set the mode from IDE to RAID since there is no AHCI option for them and see how it goes.

Some RAID controllers are capable of switching automatically between AHCI and RAID mode depending on whether the drives attached to it are part of a RAID configuration. Systems with such controllers often have RAID/AHCI as one option and IDE/Compatible mode as the only other option. A good example is my household Optiplex which presents only two options; RAID and IDE. Setting it to RAID mode gives better performance and access to features that aren't otherwise supported by the IDE mode, but the drives attached are not part of any RAID configuration.

I would recommend attaching the SSD to port 1 (the lowest numbered port) instead of the optical disc drive Since Windows is already set to load the RAID controller driver for ports 1-4, hence no registry changes are required. The SSD should remain accessible and Windows should be able to boot just fine. It may detect the SSD as new storage device and reinstall it using the RAID driver, which is normal, but Windows should not be affected by the change in any way.
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Old 03-04-2019, 01:09 PM   #8
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Originally Posted by Stancestans View Post
I would recommend attaching the SSD to port 1 (the lowest numbered port) instead of the optical disc drive Since Windows is already set to load the RAID controller driver for ports 1-4, hence no registry changes are required. The SSD should remain accessible and Windows should be able to boot just fine. It may detect the SSD as new storage device and reinstall it using the RAID driver, which is normal, but Windows should not be affected by the change in any way.
Well, that has been rather exciting!

Without making the registry changes suggested in a earlier post (in case they are incompatible with changes to the SATA port assignments), I went ahead and swapped the cables for the SSD and the Optical drive(SSD now in port 1; Optical drive in port 5). The results were faily immediate, after I had made the necessary changes to the BOOT section of BIOS: loading got to the stage of displaying the blue '4-pane' Window logo at which point the system promptly and emphatically had a conniption and powered itself off. Another try had the same result.

I've reset the cables , adjusted the BOOT section of BIOS as necessary and the system booted as normal. I'll try making the registry changes and trying the cable swap again.
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Old 03-04-2019, 01:26 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by Stancestans View Post

Sadly, I am unable to make the recommended changes: the tag 'msahci' does not exist in my registry; the tags 'pciide' and 'iaStorV' exist but are already set to zero.
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Old 03-04-2019, 08:16 PM   #10
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The reason for the registry changes is because primary drive type info is entered when Windows is installed.

I've never gone the registry changing route, as there is just too much that can be affected, and, as you have found out, things are always the same from PC to PC.

Having said that, now that you have a better understanding of what you want/need configuration wise, you can partake on the albeit slower, but more beneficial path...a fresh install of Windows.

This will provide you the benefits of Windows being properly configured for the SSD, as well as an opportunity to rid yourself of all the unused clutter which is very likely sitting on your HDD (both unused files and registry clutter). Neither of which are touched by the best software uninstallers because Windows simply won't allow some stuff to be touched.

My last reinstall of Win7, which was about 4 months, freed up over 10GB of space on my primary SSD. I remember in the XP days, a reinstall was a yearly occurance if you wanted a good running system. That Win7 install was over 4 years old.

In a nutshell, backup all of your important data (browser bookmarks and other data if wanted, email, documents, and any other data stored on the C: drive). All of this material can typically just be copied onto media (CD, DVD, USB, etc., depending on amount). You can also take the time to make an actual backup (I use AOMEI Backupper, free and easy to use). Now would also be a good time to get all of the drivers needed for your hardware and store on media as well. Shut down the PC, move and cable the devices as needed. Boot into the BIOS and make any changes needed (for the best speed as you have been attempting to do already), change the boot order to your Windows media, save and exit. Then simply boot into the Windows setup and Install. After the install, reboot into the BIOS and correct the boot order, then boot into Windows and complete the Windows setup, install all of the hardware drivers, and then update Windows. After which, it's just a matter of installing all of your needed applications, and restoring the data which you backed up.


You can also take a look through this: https://www.tweakhound.com/2015/12/0...ng-windows-10/

I've used the Win7 guide numerous times (haven't used the Win10 guide yet, but I'm sure it's solid as well).
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Old 03-05-2019, 01:19 AM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimE View Post
Having said that, now that you have a better understanding of what you want/need configuration wise, you can partake on the albeit slower, but more beneficial path...a fresh install of Windows.
Sadly I have. I also now have a Win10 system that boots but in which logon fails with a cryptic message about the profile service failing. A search of the error message say it can be fixed by starting Windows 10 in Safe Mode. All attempts to start in Safe Mode fail, aside from the trick of interrupting the windows load process 3 times in a row.

This got me into the Repair cycle through which I was able to start safe mode. Attempts to logon are halted with the wonderfully helpful message "Unknown Hard Error" presented in a style that is reminiscent of the pre-beta version of Windows 3.0 aka 'GLASS', from about 1986, if my memory is correct.

Frankly, while I quite agree with the soundness of your advice, the idea of re-installing windows just fills me with despair - I have so many applications installed and tweaked. I guess it will be a 2 day job at least because these things never work as expected {"what could possibly go wrong, again?"}. So I'm going to attempt a restore from a system image and live with the somewhat strangled SSD performance until I replace the hardware in a month or two when I need to have a lot more computing power.

But thanks to all for the suggestions and advice
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Old 03-05-2019, 03:55 AM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JimE View Post
The reason for the registry changes is because primary drive type info is entered when Windows is installed.

I've never gone the registry changing route, as there is just too much that can be affected, and, as you have found out, things are always the same from PC to PC.

Having said that, now that you have a better understanding of what you want/need configuration wise, you can partake on the albeit slower, but more beneficial path...a fresh install of Windows.

This will provide you the benefits of Windows being properly configured for the SSD, as well as an opportunity to rid yourself of all the unused clutter which is very likely sitting on your HDD (both unused files and registry clutter). Neither of which are touched by the best software uninstallers because Windows simply won't allow some stuff to be touched.

My last reinstall of Win7, which was about 4 months, freed up over 10GB of space on my primary SSD. I remember in the XP days, a reinstall was a yearly occurance if you wanted a good running system. That Win7 install was over 4 years old.

In a nutshell, backup all of your important data (browser bookmarks and other data if wanted, email, documents, and any other data stored on the C: drive). All of this material can typically just be copied onto media (CD, DVD, USB, etc., depending on amount). You can also take the time to make an actual backup (I use AOMEI Backupper, free and easy to use). Now would also be a good time to get all of the drivers needed for your hardware and store on media as well. Shut down the PC, move and cable the devices as needed. Boot into the BIOS and make any changes needed (for the best speed as you have been attempting to do already), change the boot order to your Windows media, save and exit. Then simply boot into the Windows setup and Install. After the install, reboot into the BIOS and correct the boot order, then boot into Windows and complete the Windows setup, install all of the hardware drivers, and then update Windows. After which, it's just a matter of installing all of your needed applications, and restoring the data which you backed up.


You can also take a look through this: https://www.tweakhound.com/2015/12/0...ng-windows-10/

I've used the Win7 guide numerous times (haven't used the Win10 guide yet, but I'm sure it's solid as well).
I agree completely with @JimE on this one. While I have in the past successfully taken the registry route to switch from IDE to AHCI after Windows is already installed, it is a messy affair and it's not a one-shoe-fits-all situation. A fresh, clean installation, though an inconvenience, will set things right from the get go, especially IF this was an in-place upgrade from a previous version of Windows.

Quote:
Originally Posted by XEyedBear View Post
Well, that has been rather exciting!

Without making the registry changes suggested in a earlier post (in case they are incompatible with changes to the SATA port assignments), I went ahead and swapped the cables for the SSD and the Optical drive(SSD now in port 1; Optical drive in port 5). The results were faily immediate, after I had made the necessary changes to the BOOT section of BIOS: loading got to the stage of displaying the blue '4-pane' Window logo at which point the system promptly and emphatically had a conniption and powered itself off. Another try had the same result.

I've reset the cables , adjusted the BOOT section of BIOS as necessary and the system booted as normal. I'll try making the registry changes and trying the cable swap again.
I've had a look at your board's specs and manual as well and it doesn't have two storage controllers as earlier suspected. There's only one SATA controller that is part of the AMD 785G/SB710 (AMD 7-series) chipset. JMicron, Marvell or any other storage controller is non-present on this system, so we're only working with one controller make. Asus doesn't officially support Windows 10 on your board, so there are no drivers published on Asus' support site for Windows 10. Fortunately, AMD published a fairly recently updated driver for the board's chipset as well as the RAID drivers that must be loaded during Windows Setup (often referred to as F6 drivers) to allow the drives to be detected when SATA mode is set to RAID. So, IF and when you choose to perform a clean install while SATA mode is set to RAID, make sure you have the AMD RAID (SATA RAID Only) drivers on a flash disk ready to be loaded when you reach the partition selection stage of Windows Setup. Instructions on how to use the drivers are included in that zip file.


Quote:
Originally Posted by XEyedBear View Post
Sadly, I am unable to make the recommended changes: the tag 'msahci' does not exist in my registry; the tags 'pciide' and 'iaStorV' exist but are already set to zero.
My apologies. Forget about the askvg tutorial I linked to earlier. It was never updated to reflect changes in Windows 10 and is only valid for Windows 7 and Vista. On Windows 10, the service key for the Microsoft Standard SATA AHCI Driver is called storahci. "msahci" was last used in Windows 7. Secondly, the askvg tutorial doesn't disable the pciide service as required, it leaves it enabled while also enabling the msahci and iastorv (Intel RAID Controller driver) which doesn't help in your case because your board uses an AMD RAID controller and NOT Intel. Most other tutorials covering the same subject refer to the same keys, meaning they assume the system in question uses an Intel storage controller. If at this point you're still willing to pursue the registry route, we'll have to gather a little more info about the storage drivers currently in use so that we can authoritatively give instructions on which service to disable and which one to enable to get the SSD working in RAID mode instead of IDE. It's a good thing you have a system image backup that you can restore in case of anything, such as the user profile service error you're encountering. I suggest you restore the backup (while the SSD is still in IDE mode) and make sure Windows is back up and running without issue, then if you wish to pursue the mode change without reinstalling Windows, let me know and we'll pick it up from there. In a nutshell, what need to be done are:
  • Disable the pciide driver service
  • Enable the right (AMD) RAID driver service
This will make the IDE/PATA/P-ATA controller (to which the SSD is attached when in IDE mode) unavailable, and will force Windows to re-enumerate the storage devices thus detecting the SSD as a newly attached storage device connected to the AMD RAID controller thus making the SSD accessible again, but in RAID mode instead of IDE mode.
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Old 03-05-2019, 07:21 AM   #13
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Stancestans: thank you for this magnificent and generous reply. You have done a lot of work and spent some of your personal time on my problem. I do want to proceed even if it's me just being a bit OCD and not willing to give up, even though at my age I should know better! And let me stess that I am not in any way disagreeing with the advice given by JimE and 'seconded' by yourself. That is indeed the path I will follow in a month or two when Ebay has presented an acceptable LGA 1150 (or other DDR 3-supporting) used motherboard.

For now I am back with an operational Win 10 system, having got the processs of installing from an image down to about 5 minutes through repeated experience. I have proved to myself beyond doubt that the system will not boot Win 10 correctly when the SATA configuration for the SSD connection is AHCI. ( I was going to say it will boot win 10 correctly ONLY when the SATA configuration is set to IDE, as it is now, but I realise I have not tried booting when the port to which the SSD is connected in is RAID mode.)

And I'm currently running with SSD on port 1, "D" drive on port 2, optical device on port 3, 2 other SATA drives (which were a RAID 1, now broken) on ports 5 and 6, all running in IDE mode. That's not ideal for the disks on ports 5 and 6 which are SATA 3 and which I now want to set up in what Win 10 calls 'mirrored' mode (unless the latest AMD driver you have referred me to provides a more flexible and more robust RAID1 solution ?)

So, please, could I ask the you take me though the process of getting the right drivers and the correct registry edit procedure for adding AHCI support after the fact on Win 10 installation.

Finally, I'll further demonstrate my ignorance by asking "don't I want the SATA connection mode to be AHCI rather than RAID? or does RAID imply AHCI ?"
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Old 03-05-2019, 08:05 AM   #14
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XEyedBear View Post
Stancestans: thank you for this magnificent and generous reply. You have done a lot of work and spent some of your personal time on my problem. I do want to proceed even if it's me just being a bit OCD and not willing to give up, even though at my age I should know better! And let me stess that I am not in any way disagreeing with the advice given by JimE and 'seconded' by yourself. That is indeed the path I will follow in a month or two when Ebay has presented an acceptable LGA 1150 (or other DDR 3-supporting) used motherboard.

For now I am back with an operational Win 10 system, having got the processs of installing from an image down to about 5 minutes through repeated experience. I have proved to myself beyond doubt that the system will not boot Win 10 correctly when the SATA configuration for the SSD connection is AHCI. ( I was going to say it will boot win 10 correctly ONLY when the SATA configuration is set to IDE, as it is now, but I realise I have not tried booting when the port to which the SSD is connected in is RAID mode.)

And I'm currently running with SSD on port 1, "D" drive on port 2, optical device on port 3, 2 other SATA drives (which were a RAID 1, now broken) on ports 5 and 6, all running in IDE mode. That's not ideal for the disks on ports 5 and 6 which are SATA 3 and which I now want to set up in what Win 10 calls 'mirrored' mode (unless the latest AMD driver you have referred me to provides a more flexible and more robust RAID1 solution ?)

So, please, could I ask the you take me though the process of getting the right drivers and the correct registry edit procedure for adding AHCI support after the fact on Win 10 installation.

Finally, I'll further demonstrate my ignorance by asking "don't I want the SATA connection mode to be AHCI rather than RAID? or does RAID imply AHCI ?"
First, I'd propose the following setup:

Global/OnChip SATA Operation Mode: RAID

SATA 1: SSD (OS Drive) - Set to IDE mode so that Windows starts flawlessly

SATA 2: HDD1 (RAID 1) - Set to RAID
SATA 3: HDD2 (RAID 1) - Set to RAID

Load the RAID setup utility (AMD-RAIDXpert?) and restore the RAID 1 volume/array that got broken. If I may ask, how exactly do you go about with setting up a RAID array on your system? Do you use the AMD-RAIDXpert utility from within Windows, or is there another pre-boot utility that you load before Windows starts?

SATA 5: HDD3 - Set to RAID
SATA 6: ODD - Set to RAID
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Old 03-05-2019, 09:02 AM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Stancestans View Post
First, I'd propose the following setup:

Global/OnChip SATA Operation Mode: RAID

SATA 1: SSD (OS Drive) - Set to IDE mode so that Windows starts flawlessly

SATA 2: HDD1 (RAID 1) - Set to RAID
SATA 3: HDD2 (RAID 1) - Set to RAID

Load the RAID setup utility (AMD-RAIDXpert?) and restore the RAID 1 volume/array that got broken. If I may ask, how exactly do you go about with setting up a RAID array on your system? Do you use the AMD-RAIDXpert utility from within Windows, or is there another pre-boot utility that you load before Windows starts?

SATA 5: HDD3 - Set to RAID
SATA 6: ODD - Set to RAID
Unfortunately those set of options are not possible on this mobo: I can set SATA 1, 2 and 3 - all 3- to either IDE or AHCI or RAID. If set to IDE then SATA 5 and 6 are set to IDE too, without any other option. If 1 to 3 are set to AHCI then 5 and 6 are also set to AHCI only. If 1 to 3 are set to RAID then 5 and 6 can optionally be set to RAID or IDE

I had previously set RAID 1 - using SATA ports 2 and 3 - using a utility which runs, optionally, before the rest of the BIOs. I assume this firmware is burned into the SouthBridge - but I'm only guessing. It is accessed only when a message suggesting pressing of Ctrl-F appears on the screen during POST - but as I write this I cannot remember how that message is involed. This functionality does not appear to be supplied by AMD - I think it's by PROMISE.

Anyway, given the restrictions in setting the SATA mode, I had previously found - about 9 years ago when I first got the mobo - that the only practical configuration was to have the 2 drives for the raid array on Ports 2 and 3, set to RAID. This meant that my SSD couldn't be on port 1 as this would be raid and not SATA nor IDE, which the SSD required. A similar argument said I could not put my 'D' drive (SATA 3 HDD) on Port 1 so the SSD and that HDD went on ports 5 and 6 - in IDE mode - leaving Port 1 as the only option for my optical drive. And that's where I came in.
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Old 03-05-2019, 09:38 AM   #16
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XEyedBear View Post
Unfortunately those set of options are not possible on this mobo: I can set SATA 1, 2 and 3 - all 3- to either IDE or AHCI or RAID. If set to IDE then SATA 5 and 6 are set to IDE too, without any other option. If 1 to 3 are set to AHCI then 5 and 6 are also set to AHCI only. If 1 to 3 are set to RAID then 5 and 6 can optionally be set to RAID or IDE

I had previously set RAID 1 - using SATA ports 2 and 3 - using a utility which runs, optionally, before the rest of the BIOs. I assume this firmware is burned into the SouthBridge - but I'm only guessing. It is accessed only when a message suggesting pressing of Ctrl-F appears on the screen during POST - but as I write this I cannot remember how that message is involed. This functionality does not appear to be supplied by AMD - I think it's by PROMISE.

Anyway, given the restrictions in setting the SATA mode, I had previously found - about 9 years ago when I first got the mobo - that the only practical configuration was to have the 2 drives for the raid array on Ports 2 and 3, set to RAID. This meant that my SSD couldn't be on port 1 as this would be raid and not SATA nor IDE, which the SSD required. A similar argument said I could not put my 'D' drive (SATA 3 HDD) on Port 1 so the SSD and that HDD went on ports 5 and 6 - in IDE mode - leaving Port 1 as the only option for my optical drive. And that's where I came in.
No problem. Revert to the original setup then, i.e RAID for ports 1-3 and IDE for ports 5 & 6, with HDD3 and the SSD attached to them. The CTRL+F prompt will show up if OnChip SATA Type is set to RAID. Load that RAID utility and see if the RAID 1 array is still intact. It should be IF the two HDDs were not formatted, but if its broken, see it the utility has the capability to restore or rebuild it. That SSD should be run in RAID or AHCI mode, but not IDE. By the way, you should also know that AHCI is a subset of RAID, so your concern that you'd be losing SATA if you set the mode to RAID is misplaced. RAID and AHCI are both SATA modes, and RAID gives you AHCI functionality and more, so RAID mode is the best option for the SSD in your case. IDE mode is an injustice to that SSD.
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Old 03-05-2019, 01:06 PM   #17
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I have now reverted to my riginal configuration of ports and devices. I have my RAID Ary1 in RAID mode1 again (just with the wrong disk label, because I connected the 2 HDDs in the 'reversed' ports) and my SSD operating in IDE mode. So, back where I started.

I see an article about getting AHCI support after Win 10 has been installed by booting into safe mode by using BCEDIT /SET ...... in command prompt, rebooting changing the SATA Mode to AHCI or RAID in BIOS, rebooting and using BCEDIT again to revert from safe mode. I have no idea why this works; is it likely to cause me a BSOD, or even worse, a black one?
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Old 03-06-2019, 02:29 AM   #18
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I now have my system booting without problem with ALL ports set to SATA mode 'RAID'.

However there does not seem to be an obvious performnance improvement (especially the time from restart to being able to log-on). When I run the supplier-supported diagnostics against the SSD (2 versions of them) no SSD is detected.

I don't know of a way of determining what driver is actually being used by the SSD - yes, I can get driver details through Device Manager but the names mean nothing to me. So I don't know if I'm still running this SSD in PATA/IDE mode or not. How can I tell?

And should I be setting the SATA mode for ALL ports to AHCI ? (I can rebuild the RAID array using Win Disk Management).
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Old 03-06-2019, 03:41 AM   #19
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Quote:
Originally Posted by XEyedBear View Post
I now have my system booting without problem with ALL ports set to SATA mode 'RAID'.

However there does not seem to be an obvious performnance improvement (especially the time from restart to being able to log-on). When I run the supplier-supported diagnostics against the SSD (2 versions of them) no SSD is detected.

I don't know of a way of determining what driver is actually being used by the SSD - yes, I can get driver details through Device Manager but the names mean nothing to me. So I don't know if I'm still running this SSD in PATA/IDE mode or not. How can I tell?

And should I be setting the SATA mode for ALL ports to AHCI ? (I can rebuild the RAID array using Win Disk Management).
If SATA mode for the SSD's port is set to RAID and Windows is booting just fine in normal mode (not Safe boot), then it's no longer running in IDE mode. You can confirm this in BIOS setup. Let's see what you have in Device Manager. Expand the sections named IDE ATA/ATAPI controllers and Storage controllers, resize the window so that everything comes into view and then take a screenshot of it and attach it in your next reply.

You can also view the devices by connection. Expand the Disk drives section and select your SSD, then go to the View menu (of Device Manager) and select Devices by connection. You will now have a view of which controller the SSD is attached to. Double-click that controller, switch to the Driver tab and take its screenshot. Click the Driver Details button to open another dialog that shows the driver files in use by that controller. You can take a screenshot of that too. Switch to the Details tab then click the drop-down field labelled Property. From the drop-down list that appears, select Service. Inside the box labelled Value, the name of the service that loads that controller's driver will be shown. You can also take a screenshot of that and post them all here.
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Old 03-06-2019, 04:19 AM   #20
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There is never a dull moment when messing about with computers, is there?

I wish I has known that the option to set up mirrored disk in Disk Management is not available if you have the Home edition of Win 10. So helpful of those web-sites that explain how to set up a mirrored pair not to mention this somewhat inconveneint restriction.
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