Go Back   Tech Support Forum > Networking Forum > Modems/Cable/DSL/Satellite

User Tag List

4G backup connection

This is a discussion on 4G backup connection within the Modems/Cable/DSL/Satellite forums, part of the Tech Support Forum category. Hey folks, Think this is probably the correct subform for this. My partner and I both work at home, and


Closed Thread
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Old 12-23-2019, 02:57 AM   #1
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 26
OS: Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1


Question

Hey folks,

Think this is probably the correct subform for this. My partner and I both work at home, and a reliable connection is an absolute must. I've been putting off changing ISP for a while now for this reason.

What I was thinking is to get a 4G router and sim (UK) as a backup. I don't have any experience with equipment of this kind, but from what I'm seeing, in general there appear to be small, single device dongles, cheap portable WiFi routers that appear to be designed to be standalone, and full wireless routers. There are obviously more business type options as well with antennas and built-in switches etc. Here's some examples of these just for reference;

Dongle - https://www.amazon.co.uk/Huawei-Unlo...dp/B011BRKPLE/
Portable WiFi router - https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B07QHHJ3N2/
Router - https://www.amazon.co.uk/dp/B016ZWXYXG/

Not suggesting purchasing these, just noting them as the general options I'm seeing.

Since we have several devices critical to working at home, a dongle doesn't seem appropriate. That being said, I have spotted a few routers that support these. I.e. connect 4G dongle to usb port on existing router. I currently have a Linksys EA6900 but don't see any explicit mention of it supporting this. Signal strength aside, this may be a viable cheap option if it is supported?

For the other options, I'd prefer not to have to introduce a new wireless network just for this. A portable router isn't really necessary either. So assuming the dongle approach isn't viable, would a router like that linked above be a suitable option? It does seem a little overkill since I'd be switching the wifi off anyway and simply connecting it to the existing network as a modem. I don't seem to see many devices specifically for this purpose, although I have spotted this from netgear;

https://www.amazon.co.uk/NETGEAR-LB2...dp/B0793JTXY3/

That would appear to be designed for this purpose, albeit this one is locked to AT&T, correct? Not sure if I specifically need a failover device like this, it is a backup. So with any luck it shouldn't be needed (often!), but may be the better option?

Any thoughts would be appreciated.

Many thanks,

Baps.
yerbaps is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 12-29-2019, 05:51 PM   #2
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Albuquerque, NM
Posts: 89
OS: Windows 10



I take it you are looking for a cellular network? Hence why it says a 4G connection?

I will assume you mean a cell network for 4G coverage so I might as well give my own personal findings as I have come into a situation where I no longer have access to a landline of any kind for an internet connection and now have to do everything wirelessly.

When it comes to a 4G (Cellular) network you may want to look into MIMO (Multiple in Multiple out) devices. Such as the Netgear Nighthawk, or the "MiFi 8800L." Granted I do not own the Netgear Nighthawk just yet but I am going to give it a try sometime soon as I just do not have enough spare capital to purchase one myself yet. BUT I do own what they call a "Jet pack" from verizon.

What you need to know about Mobile Internet Devices. They have a CAT number associated with them. This "CAT" number means Category. And the higher the number next to that CAT acronym is important as it means the 4g/5g/ what ever G bands are more broad in range. If you have a CAT 8 cell jet pack you won't be able to get as high of an internet connection than a Cat 18 (8800L MiFi) "jet pack." This means you do not have access to certain bands in the higher ranges such as 66 68 and so on. You are capped off at around 20. Don't quote me on this I am doing it from memory***

The Netgear nighthawk is a Cat 16 device but you can buy one online that doesn't have any "company" locks on it. If you buy say a Verizon Jet Pack 8800L then you are hindered to for ever use that product with Verizon or AT&T or what ever company brands their name on the product. (I found this out only after I purchased the 8800L from verizon.) So buying an unlocked and "un-carrier" specific MIMO device will be a better option if you feel like switching companies to find the best and better deals found on the market.

So when looking at a 4G or now 5G "MIMO" device it is worth looking at its CAT rating. The higher the number next to the CAT the better options you have, but it also means the more expensive your device is going to be. However it does perform on higher bands and is more future proof to spend a little more for that technology now than to wait X years for the next thing to come out. like 99G.

5G "jet packs" start at 500 dollars. My 8800L is not capable of 5G internet. And I bought mine outright for 200 dollars.

IF YOU BUY A MIMO DEVICE you may want to invest immediately in getting some antennas, NOT BOOSTERS, for your MIMO device. Adding antennas to your Mimo device will out perform any booster for DOWNLOAD speeds, not upload. Boosters only improve your UPLOAD speed. PLEASE remember this as it is very important! Bars on your MIMO 4G internet device are pretty much meaningless. It only means ou are very far away from the cell tower. Screaming your boosted signal for upload speed to the cell tower does not mean the cell tower boosts its signal back to you. They don't do anything at all. Only option is to get an antenna for your car/boat/office/home office/ or possibly if you are feeling froggy, your motorcycle.

Granted if you are getting a good connection speed of up and down on your device then the antennas are not needed. But if you are going out into the boonies? you will NEED antennas. And remember in the 4G world of internet connection, having just 1 bar is good enough for speeds of up to 56K (dial up modem speed) for internet. I know from experience. Sometimes having 1 bar will still get you at least a 15Mbps (1.5 megabyte) connection speed. Sometimes more, sometimes less. Depends on interference (Mountains, sky scrapers, atmospherc pressure.)

I see you want to be able to connect multiple devices to this little 4G connection. Buying a jetpack such as the 8800L MiFi "Jet pack" or the Netgear "Nighthawk" is already an awesome router. I have 2 tablets, a PC, and two cell phones connected to my Jetpack currently. And while I do not use all of these devices at once, the 8800L can use a 5 GHz wifi signal to each device. Spreading out the wireless channels much more than a 2.4Ghz model. So again paying more for your little 4G device is worth the money.

Finally when shopping for internet packages? And I can not express this enough as I am currently stuck with a Verizon Branded AT&T scammed device for the rest of my days... Buy the MIMO device free from any company as their skewed tactics are only hurting the damn market. Shop around for your choice in 4G or the now 5G coverage. There are options.

There is a youtube channel dedicated to using MIMO devices you should look into to get much more information on these little gadgets.
The_Con-Sept is offline  
Old 12-31-2019, 12:23 PM   #3
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 26
OS: Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1



Thanks man, appreciate the input. Yes, we it is a cellular backup connection I'm after.

5G is pretty limited here, but obviously it wont stay like that. From what I'm seeing there aren't a lot of devices that aren't expensive anyway, so probably not worth it currently.

That's an interesting note on the CAT rating. A lot of the ones I've seen don't note any, but the more expensive ones do. And the larger that number the more expensive it seems.

Problem is I don't want to replace my existing wifi network with this at all. It's a backup only. Most of the devices I'm seeing are intended as wifi routers. I think I'll keep looking.

Thanks for the info!

Baps.
yerbaps is offline  
Sponsored Links
Advertisement
 
Old 01-02-2020, 07:25 AM   #4
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Albuquerque, NM
Posts: 89
OS: Windows 10



You can tell the difference between a little wifi repeater and a cell router quickly by looking on the box it comes in. It should have a: SIMSKU and an IMEI. (IMEI is required to use cellular networks. Without an IMEI its just another WiFi repeater.)

You could get by with eas on a Cat 12 or even a Cat 8 cell backup plan for like 50 bux extra per month. You can also find some prepaid or "pay as you go" devices in an electronics shop. But yes you must see a Cat on a MIMO device. Multiple in Multiple out means you have 2 ears for hearing and 2 voices for shouting coming from the device.

If you are not going out into the wild blue yonder or out in the great plains in the middle of a bunch of farmland you should be fine with what ever little device they have inside of the cell phone shop for around 100 bux. But I would definitely look inside of those cell phone shops and ask the merchant about "jet packs." and if he has any worth looking at.

And yes again the higher th price the more bandwidth will be available to you in the package. If it is a backup connection for google browsing then a cat8 would be just fine. But if you need to download say a 20 gig backup disc, or a 700 mb windows image file... get at least a Cat 16. That nighthawk should do you perfect but it is expensive.
The_Con-Sept is offline  
Old 01-11-2020, 10:57 AM   #5
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Apr 2011
Posts: 26
OS: Windows 7 Ultimate x64 SP1



Perhaps the shops in the US are a little better equipped than here. Went to two and all they had were of the portable wifi type which aren't what I'm after at all. One O2 rep was adamant these are the only type of devices available.

Just as an update in case it's of any use to anyone, I finally bought this;

https://teltonika-networks.com/product/rut240/

It only has a Cat 4 rating, but easy setup and getting speeds of 24mbps up, 20mbps down at the best connection signal available here for the mobile network I'm using (EE). Not awesome, but not expensive and fine for a backup connection. This is one of the cheaper models in the line. They also have similar Cat 6 devices with more features.

Failover works very well. Instantly switching to the mobile WAN if the main WAN goes down. Restoring the connection actually introduces a slight downtime of a few seconds, but from looking at the logs, I think this is actually my internal network and not the device causing this downtime.

Now time to switch ISP!

Thanks The_Con-Sept, appreciate your help.

Baps.
yerbaps is offline  
Old 01-12-2020, 05:40 PM   #6
Registered Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2009
Location: Albuquerque, NM
Posts: 89
OS: Windows 10



I forget that in other countries you have different setups but it looks like your Cat 4 cell device should do fine. It does have a connector for RP-SMA so purchasing one, *OR MULTIPLE, of these: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07MG6ZXCD...ing=UTF8&psc=1

may be in your interest IF you are going out into the middle of no where. otherwise you may never need to purchase this if you are not traveling out at sea, or into the mountains.

That device is capable of 4G LTE and it can operate up to bands B41. Which means when shopping for a new cellular network make sure they operate below band 41. You will not be able to accept bands 66, 68 and so on. Just remember this when shopping for a new cellular network. The guy at the shop might not be knowledgeable on this as this is an advanced question that he may need help answering.

For reference your device can connect to the following bands for
LTE 4G connections: LTE B1, B3, B5, B8, B20, B38, B40 and B41.
GSM connections: 900 and 1800 (international).
3G: WCDMA 850, 900, 2100.
Certain cell networks operate on certain bands. I do not know what companies operate on which bands, but do keep this as a reference written down on the modem itself. That way you can check it yourself when shopping for a new cell network. It may be difficult to pinpoint this information but once you find what bands they operate on you can quickly compare it yourself.
The_Con-Sept is offline  
Closed Thread

Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is on
Smilies are on
[IMG] code is on
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Post a Question


» Site Navigation
 > FAQ
  > 10.0.0.2
Powered by vBadvanced CMPS v3.2.3


All times are GMT -7. The time now is 10:05 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.8
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, vBulletin Solutions, Inc.
vBulletin Security provided by vBSecurity v2.2.2 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
User Alert System provided by Advanced User Tagging v3.1.0 (Pro) - vBulletin Mods & Addons Copyright © 2020 DragonByte Technologies Ltd.
Copyright 2001 - 2018, Tech Support Forum

Windows 10 - Windows 7 - Windows XP - Windows Vista - Trojan Removal - Spyware Removal - Virus Removal - Networking - Security - Top Web Hosts