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Use Belkin Wireless Router as Wifi Receiver?

This is a discussion on Use Belkin Wireless Router as Wifi Receiver? within the Protocols and Routing forums, part of the Tech Support Forum category. I just acquired a new (old) pc, wiped it clean and installed a fresh copy of windows xp pro on


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Old 04-27-2010, 11:41 AM   #1
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I just acquired a new (old) pc, wiped it clean and installed a fresh copy of windows xp pro on it.. It does not have wifi built in like my laptop, and other Desktop does. I am currently using a linksys WRT54G router to provide wifi to anyone in my apt. (WEP secured)
I also own a Belkin F5D7230-4 router that I would LOVE to be able to use as a RECEIVER instead of a router.(so I don't have to buy anything extra, or run cables everywhere)
I looked around in the belkin's settings (connected via LAN to the new (old) PC) for this "repeater" option I've heard about which would enable me to do this, but can't seem to find anything like it..

Is there anyway to use this as a receiver? or maybe vice versa, and use my linsys as a receiver?


I'm pretty savvy with accessing the router's i.p., setting it up with modems and PC's and all that jazz, I just get lost in the settings sometimes.. lol. and this seemingly simple task is beginning to make my head hurt trying to figure it out on my own lol..
All drivers (LAN adapter) and firmware versions are also up to date..

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Old 04-27-2010, 01:02 PM   #2
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My best guess is that a belkin ROUTER doesn't have this feature. Try and get a hold of a real access-point. That one should be able to to REPEATING.

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Old 04-27-2010, 02:13 PM   #3
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the reason I posted this thread was to avoid your exact answer..

The belkin has "use as access point" capabilities. I just need help setting it up, not comments stating the obvious "Buy this instead" way of doing it.
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Old 04-27-2010, 05:28 PM   #4
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I have tried several Belkin routers as wireless bridges, and I was never able to get them to work with non-Belkin routers. They even admit in their documentation that you need another Belkin product at the other end of the connection.

I'm assuming you are talking about a wireless bridge not WAP functionality. Any router can be configured to act as a typical WAP as follows.


Connecting two (or more) SOHO broadband routers together.

Note: The "primary" router can be an actual router, a software gateway like Microsoft Internet Connection Sharing, or a server connection that has the capability to supply more than one IP address using DHCP server capability. No changes are made to the primary "router" configuration.

Configure the IP address of the secondary router(s) to be in the same subnet as the primary router, but out of the range of the DHCP server in the primary router. For instance DHCP server addresses 192.168.0.2 through 192.168.0.100, I'd assign the secondary router 192.168.0.254 as it's IP address, 192.168.0.253 for another router, etc.

Note: Do this first, as you will have to reboot the computer to connect to the router again for the remaining changes.

Disable the DHCP server in the secondary router.

Setup the wireless section just the way you would if it was the primary router, channels, encryption, etc.

Connect from the primary router's LAN port to one of the LAN ports on the secondary router. If there is no uplink port and neither of the routers have auto-sensing ports, use a cross-over cable. Leave the WAN port unconnected!

This procedure bypasses the routing function (NAT layer) and configures the router as a switch (or wireless access point for wireless routers).

For reference, here's a link to a Typical example config using a Netgear router
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Old 08-04-2010, 12:03 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ACoolDude View Post
My best guess is that a belkin ROUTER doesn't have this feature. Try and get a hold of a real access-point. That one should be able to to REPEATING.
that's right
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Old 08-05-2010, 02:49 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by johnwill View Post
Connect from the primary router's LAN port to one of the LAN ports on the secondary router. If there is no uplink port and neither of the routers have auto-sensing ports, use a cross-over cable. Leave the WAN port unconnected!
JohnWill, your solution works fine when the routers are phisyically connected by LAN. The topicstarter asked to connect the routers without running cabling. Of course the topicstarter is not waiting for an answer like 'buy this or that'. Then let me be clear: it cannot be done! you do not own the right equipment for this task.

I understand it is an old topic, but was revived again...
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Old 08-05-2010, 06:38 AM   #7
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Correct, but your advice to buy an access point won't solve this particular issue either. He needs a wireless bridge. Some AP products including wireless bridge capability, but many don't.
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Old 08-05-2010, 09:38 AM   #8
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johnwill, you are so right. He does need a Bridge capable access-point I've got my lingo mixed-up! There are Belkin Access-points which can be configed as a bridge, I was, at my best, trying to explain...but be aware most vendors only like their own products to be bridged with!
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Old 08-06-2010, 07:16 AM   #9
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Well, I specifically recommend against Belkin, even their products with wireless bridge capability only seem to want to talk to other Belkin products. They have a statement to that effect somewhere, and I now believe them.

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