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This is a discussion on Cat 6 Connectors? within the Cabling and Network Cards forums, part of the Tech Support Forum category. Is there any difference between cat5e and cat6 connectors? Or are the cat5e the same as the cat6 like the


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Old 01-15-2007, 01:18 PM   #1
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Is there any difference between cat5e and cat6 connectors? Or are the cat5e the same as the cat6 like the guy at ratshack claims?

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Old 01-16-2007, 09:55 AM   #2
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Both CAT5e and CAT6 use RJ-45 jacks. The RJ-45 jacks are of course horrible in that you lose twists, and are more susceptible to EMI/RFI, and the locking tab tends to break after some use (ugh). However the real reason they're used is because they are dirt cheap.

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Old 01-16-2007, 12:07 PM   #3
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There is no difference between CAT5/CAT5e/CAT6 jacks. I have to agree with Cellus, they are certainly a PITA, and it amazes me that they became the standard.

To eliminate the snagging issue, you can get boots for the connectors.

One handy little thing that I got a handful of from the local Verizon guy is alignment tabs for putting the connectors on. They're just little black plastic inserts with 8 holes for the wires. You line up the wires in holes, trim to length, and then just stuff them into the connectors. Much easier than trying to line up the wires as you cram them into the connectors.
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Old 01-17-2007, 08:09 PM   #4
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You can actually pick up bulk packages of RJ-45 connectors that come with the wire guides fairly easily. Unfortunately for me I've grown too used to not using them that my hands turn into butterfingers when I try using them.
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Old 01-17-2007, 08:47 PM   #5
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I've become quite used to the guides, and wouldn't really want to do without them anymore. The RJ45 connectors we buy come with the guides, so it's easy. But like Cellus and johnwill alluded, can't we do better than these things?
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Old 01-18-2007, 07:33 AM   #6
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I must live a sheltered life, I never saw the guides before the Verizon guy showed up. I don't normally do much wiring, since that's done before I show up to make the network go.
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Old 01-18-2007, 09:46 AM   #7
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There is a difference, but not from a performance standpoint.

Cat6 wire is slightly bigger (23AWG) than Cat5e wire (24AWG), so the plugs have to accomodate this.
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Old 01-18-2007, 07:35 PM   #8
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Ok, thanks for the input. I just bought some shielded cat6 connectors with guides!
Hope this works right. Actually I was wondering if the materials were different to accomidate the increase in bandwidth. So I got some big metal looking ones for just a buck more per connector. Oh yeah, and a kremper for cheap.
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Old 01-18-2007, 09:42 PM   #9
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Are you using shielded cat6 cable, and do you have a gigabit network?

If not non shielded cat5e would work just fine, and be cheaper. It should work nontheless though. If you need any instructions on building the cable, check out cat-5-cable.com. Instructions for cat5 or cat6.
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Old 01-19-2007, 08:31 AM   #10
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CAT5 Cable Wiring Diagram

HOW TO MAKE YOUR OWN CAT 5, TWISTED-PAIR NETWORK CABLES

I don't know about the "big metal looking" connectors, but I'm sure they're not necessary. I have gigabit to a number of machines here, and I use the standard connectors with no issues.
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Old 01-19-2007, 09:01 AM   #11
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Yes I'm putting together a gigabyte network. I have a large spool pf solid cat6 cable. It is shielded. I'll probably go with standard ones in the future then, but I got my kremping tool for 1/3 the price of ratshack's one. So it all worked out. Thanks for the links. I'll be back if I have any questions.
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Old 01-19-2007, 06:09 PM   #12
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Gee, as I recall, the Radio Shack crimping tool was only about $15! I paid $70 for mine, but it's slightly higher quality.
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Old 01-20-2007, 03:16 PM   #13
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The cheap crimping tools unfortunately are quite cheap - I've worn the teeth on one, and found the teeth misaligned on another. As such I'm not a huge fan of the cheap ones. Besides, I like mine in that they have an edge on them to snip wires, so I don't have to pack wire cutters in my kit as well.
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Old 03-11-2007, 01:06 AM   #14
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Hi, I know nothing about pc networking but I spent 10yrs with a network cable/patch equipment manufacturer and learned a lot about plugs, jacks and tooling
1) Not all RJ45 plugs are the same! The quality varies wildly. The guys in the lab used to have to make up 20 or 30 connectors to get one that was on the line for "at the limit" testing. I agree the average home user won't be incommoded, yet! But as Gbit works through some folks will come a cropper!

I have found our polycarbonate plugs to be VERY robust, far better that say, USB, tread on that and bye bye! Maybe UK supplies are better?
Yup, the latch can catch but as someone said you can get boots to stop this, there is also a clever plug design that overcomes it.

N. very B. You should not mix plugs for patch cables for those for solid wire. The contacts are different and you will get poor and int' contact.
You should not really put plugs on solid but I know it is done.
My old company used the AMP termination tool (RS no 250-3539) and they did Thousands of terms' a year. Yes they wore out eventually but I do not think a home bod is going to do it! By the way, keep the tool CLEAN take out the dieset every 100 crimps or so, wash the tool and set in WD40, drain and serve.
Lastly, if you are doing more than a very few cables, invest in a tester, the wee yellow thing from "test um" is handy but even better is an Alpha Tester,

Dave

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